scamp sailboat cruising

Small Craft Advisor

scamp sailboat cruising

Boat Designs: Evaluating SCAMP’S Big Sister

(this new welsford cruiser checks a lot of boxes…).

scamp sailboat cruising

Over the past few days I’ve had email exchanges with John Welsford, New Zealand designer, regarding a brainstorm that’s been percolating in his clever, whimsical noggin: A bigger, more commodious takeoff on his wildly popular SCAMP design.

As most SCA readers know, the 11’ 11” SCAMP design was conceived 13 years ago when Josh Colvin, editor of this fine publication, asked Welsford to come up with a new kind of small cruising boat—one small enough to explore the most hard-to-penetrate backwaters, while being easy to rig, light enough to trailer with the smallest of tow vehicles, surprisingly great under sail, and comfy for overnight camp-cruising adventures. So, following some tweaks by designer and master boatbuilder Kees Prins, the resulting sailboat was dubbed SCAMP, for Small Craft Advisor Magazine Project.

SCAMP DRAWING…

scamp sailboat cruising

The rest is history: More building plans and kits for SCAMP have been sold over the years than any other small cruising boat we can think of. Besides the original wooden version, Gig Harbor Boat Works was licensed in 2013 to produce a fiberglass SCAMP, and the little giant killer—in wood and fiberglass—has since its debut been at the center of various small-boat rallies, workshops and sailing events.

While SCAMPs are still being built worldwide by enthusiasts, plan and kit sales have slowly been approaching what might be a kind of saturation point. It’s not that “everyone who wants a SCAMP has already built one,” but we get the feeling that it’s time for something new and different—like a SCAMP-inspired design that has the personality and quirky appeal of the original boat, but with more creature comforts (for an aging population of SCAMP lovers).

Meet SCALLYWAG, John Welsford’s big sister to SCAMP, a 15’ 4” x 7’ 3” wonder with a “real” cabin, tabernacle mast, mizzen sail, powerful main, water-ballast tanks, sitting headroom down below…and like SCAMP, faster than many onlookers might expect.

SCALLYWAG DRAWING…

scamp sailboat cruising

This might turn out to be a timely, common-sense follow-up to the successful SCAMP design—so tempting that John Welsford is talking about building one for himself.

(As a footnote, we might add that in 2008, prior to the introduction of SCAMP in 2010, Welsford came up with another design that was similar to but somewhat larger than SCAMP—called TREAD LIGHTLY, which measured 13’ overall, with a beam of 5’ and addition of a mizzen. The series of similar hulls began with PEANUTS, an experimental build that never quite made the plans list. That design led to TENDER BEHIND, then SHERPA, then TREAD LIGHTLY, then SCAMP, then SCRAPS and now SCALLYWAG. Quite a series!)

TREAD LIGHTLY drawing…immediate predecessor to SCAMP)

scamp sailboat cruising

Here is John Welsford’s description of the SCALLYWAG design:

“I’ve had a number of people tell me they love SCAMP, but they’d like a ‘real’ cabin—something that would provide shelter for a couple of friends to overnight out of the rain; somewhere with space enough for four to sit and chat over coffee or rum on a cold evening; somewhere with a bench for a cooker, a table to eat the food off of, and lockers for all the essentials…and room for the skipper and first mate to stretch out and sleep in comfort.

“SCALLYWAG is not so big as to make launching and retrieving a chore; her mainmast is in a tabernacle, which makes standing it up easy-peasy for clients who don’t like the idea of lifting a mast that size vertically into place. Her mizzen is light enough to not be a worry, too, in that respect.

“The rig is a powerful one, but easy to access for reefing, and she will heave to under mizzen with the main let free so she sits mostly head-to-wind, dry and restful if a gust has to be waited out.

“I’ve added a pair of big water tanks for ballast, so with that and her beamy shape she’ll be very stable. Her cockpit self-drains, the motor is inside the tall transom for easy access, and while there’s room in the cockpit for four, she’ll be easy to single-hand and relaxing to sail.

“While the relationship between SCALLYWAG and SCAMP is obvious, it’s not just the styling. The backroom calculations in hydrodynamics suggest she’ll handle well, and be faster than many expect. With high stability and the ability to sit upright when aground, she’ll be able to transition from hiding in the mud or sand up a creek somewhere, to making a longer coastal passage without any fuss.

“Construction is simply plywood over ply bulkheads, with stringers to line everything up, and with considerable buoyancy just in case. The plans will have scale drawings of all major components, and we anticipate soon having printable full-sized templates for frames and other key items.”

As for specifications, beyond the overall length of 15’ 4” and beam of 7’ 3,” SCALLYWAG will have board-up draft of 10,” a board-down draft of 3’ 4,” a total sail area of 143 s.f. and a fully-rigged dry weight of 750 lbs. (Incidentally, the beam-to-length ratios of SCAMP and SCALLYWAG are almost identical.)

John Welsford says that plans for SCALLYWAG will be available on December 1, but he can take orders in the meantime. Price will be $245 U.S. funds for emailed, printable PDFs, and the plans can be ordered via John’s website: jwboatdesigns.co.nz (Joel Bergen, well-known for the Welsford Navigator he built and sails in many Northwest small-boat events, will be developing a set of SCALLYWAG patterns in the not-distant future, according to Welsford. Editor’s note: We heard from Joel yesterday; he’s hoping to develop CAD-produced patterns “in a few weeks,” now that he’s received initial SCALLYWAG drawings. Stay tuned; we’ll provide updates on plans and patterns in this space.)

FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF THE SCALLYWAG DESIGN:

Eager to hear what SCAMP-savvy friends might have to say about the SCALLYWAG specs and just-released drawing, we sought initial reactions from…

JOSH COLVIN, editor of Small Craft Advisor , who commissioned the SCAMP design in 2010 and enjoys sailing SCAMP #1:

“There’s certainly no doubt who designed this one! It looks almost as much like Welsford’s PENGUIN as a SCAMP. SCALLYWAG’s length is a sweet spot in terms of accommodations potential. She’ll be rowed less than most SCAMPs, but I love the inboard motor well to keep her lines clean, and the engine right at hand. But her most exciting feature is the addition of the mizzen, which will improve seaworthiness and make managing the mainsail easier.

“Between LONG STEPS and SCALLYWAG, those looking for something like SCAMP, but larger, have great options. I’m excited to see the first boat built—she will be bigger than most expect, just looking at the drawing.” SIMEON BALDWIN, builder of an early SCAMP who has perhaps sailed more nautical miles with a SCAMP than anyone…and who has also served as a generous advisor to fellow SCAMP builders and is an expert on rigging and sailing the little 11’ 11” boats:

“I like what I see of this long-rumored design. Knowing John and his attention to ergonomics, I can anticipate it will work well. The tabernacled mast and addition of a mizzen are most appealing.

“From the drawing I think it may resemble LONG STEPS in terms of the recessed footwell. It also appears he is eschewing a by-design lazarette made popular by many SCAMP owners.

“The double water tanks are something to contemplate. I don’t envision SCALLYWAG as a purpose-built racer with crew, actively keeping high-side ballast on long tacks, like the SKATE 15 that Brandon Davis designed, which utilizes two tanks and a dump-valve system that may be more elaborate than a typical cruising sailor would want to live with. But John may be describing two water tanks that are filled and remain separate from one another.”

(Editor’s note: Welsford’s comment on tanks, “The ballast tanks are linked, and they’re not far enough off the centerline to work independently. There is one each side of the aft end of the centerboard case and they go out as far as the seat-front extensions.”)

“I’m looking forward to how all of this works out!”

BRANDON DAVIS, of Turn Point Design in Port Townsend, whose company cuts CNC kits for the SCAMP and a variety of other small boats. Brandon is also a skilled designer and small-boat sailor:

“I really like this boat, since it has just enough room to have a cabin but it’s still small enough to be trailered, beached and easily built in a garage. The enclosed cabin should encourage longer trips or taking a friend along.

“The longer waterline should increase average sailing speeds. My guess is that rowing speed will be lower than the SCAMP, as the rower will not be able to take advantage of the waterline length because of her weight.

“Will SCALLYWAG be offered as a kit? I could see it selling well as a kit and the market could be ripe. Many SCAMP builders might consider this as their next build.

“I look forward to seeing the first SCALLYWAGs on the water!”

KEES PRINS, designer and boatbuilder, who constructed the first SCAMP while serving as boatshop manager at the Northwest Maritime Center…and in the process suggested and implemented some changes that improved the design:

“I think SCALLYWAG will find a great following in the SCAMP world and beyond. Adding a cabin will greatly enlarge the ‘SCAMP Crowd.’ At that beam, and with twin ballast tanks, stability should be enormous for a boat this length. I would have liked to see a cross section through the cabin to know more about sitting comfort. (Four people hanging out inside seems a little optimistic, but two should be comfortable.)

“I’m curious about what the tabernacle for the unsupported mast will look like. A big sail area, together with a stiff hull will induce a significant load on the tabernacle. There seems to be a deep well for the mast base to swing through, judging by the drain hole.

“All in all, SCALLYWAG looks very promising.”

OSCAR LIND, a serious student of all various small-boat designs , and earlier builder of a SCAMP, who shares at least one thing in common with John Welsford—they’ve never met a pun they didn’t like:

“I might have to clear out the shop and make as much room as possible to build this boat (due to the 7’ 3” beam, especially). It’s so tempting and fills the bill for usability and function.

“It does need a Chinese lug rig, though. I expect quite a few SCALLYWAGS will ultimately be built.”

(Editor’s note: John Welsford comments, “I like the Chinese lugsail, but for a sail of this size on a boat that will be trailered, rigged and derigged for each outing and dry-stored, the extra complexity of the Junk sail slows the process. As well, the balanced lug is in my experience, a little quicker upwind—unless the junk rig has cambered-panel sails, and there are few sailmakers producing those, so I think in this case, simplicity and performance get the nod.”)

As for my personal view as a serial boatbuilder, restorer and sometimes buyer of project boats, I enjoyed owning a SCAMP several years ago. While I loved sailing the boat, I wished it was bigger and included a sleeping cabin. So, John’s new SCALLYWAG design checks many more boxes as an all-around keeper, and I prefer its overall hull, cabin and rig design, not to mention its potential as a serious cruising machine.

So, once again, here’s a chance for you, as a fellow boat nut, to offer your evaluation of SCAMP and her newly-hatched big sister, SCALLYWAG. (Also, please add other thoughts in the comments section below…) • SCA •

scamp sailboat cruising

· Liked by Joshua Colvin, Marty Loken

Liked by Marty Loken

Ready for more?

Boat Profile

A little camp cruiser for big dreams

From Issue   Small Boats Annual 2016 October 2015

N ever mind that until grounding on a mudflat less than 30 miles from the finish line, SCAMP #4 breezed through a difficult year in the 300-mile Everglades Challenge adventure race a few years ago, pressing on comfortably when many bigger boats had to quit. Never mind that during the inaugural Race to Alaska earlier this year, SCAMP #11 completed a very rough 40-mile open-water crossing of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, taking its solo skipper safely from Port Townsend, Washington, to Victoria, British Columbia. And never mind that yet another SCAMP (extensively modified for the venture by its builder) may attempt to round Cape Horn—yes, that Cape Horn—this year and, if successful, will be the smallest sailboat ever to do so. Despite all that, the overwhelming impression I get when Dave Ender drives up with his newly built SCAMP to take me sailing is: What a cute little boat.

The buoyancy of the blunt pram bow resists digging in while running downwind and reduces the likelihood of broaching.

The buoyancy of the blunt pram bow resists digging in while running downwind and reduces the likelihood of broaching.

SCAMP is short, curvy, beamy, and high-sided, with a well-rockered flat bottom and a distinctive pram bow—a cross between a bulldog, a basketball, and an angry rubber duck. It’s also one of the easiest-launching boats I’ve ever encountered. I barely had time to grab my gear before Ender had the boat rigged and ready: mast stepped, sail hoisted, and rudder hung on the transom. He backed the trailer into the water and shoved SCAMP off. Less than 10 minutes from arrival and it was time to sail.

Josh Colvin, who commissioned SCAMP—an acronym for Small Craft Advisor Magazine Project—wasn’t looking for an ultimate adventure boat when he approached New Zealand designer John Welsford (see WB No. 225 for a profile on Welsford and his design work). “My initial goals for the boat were based largely on a 150-mile sail down the Columbia River, from Beacon Rock to Astoria,” Colvin says. “I kept coming across backwaters and shallow estuarine areas and thinking, That’s where I really want to go , but my 16-footer was too deep, wasn’t easy to row, and if I wanted to overnight up among the reeds, wouldn’t dry out level if the tide left. So the idea I eventually took to John Welsford was for the smallest possible boat that would be able to do all of these things, but still be seaworthy enough to cope with something like the middle of the Columbia River on a breezy afternoon.”

Judging by SCAMP’s popularity among amateur builders—roughly 340 kits or plan sets have been sold since 2011, with about 60 boats launched—plenty of other people are interested, too. Designer John Welsford sees SCAMP as a sort of 21st-century version of a much-loved classic, the Mirror dinghy. “While we don’t expect to do anywhere near as many boats,” Welsford says, “it’s hitting a similar, but older market.” Along the way, SCAMP has fostered an enthusiastic and supportive community of builders and owners, encouraging new builders to take the plunge.

The SCAMPS's 100-sq-ft sail is set high for good visibility under the boom and is easily reefed.

The SCAMPS’s 100-sq-ft sail is set high for good visibility under the boom and is easily reefed.

To bring the new design to life, Welsford was able to make good use of his previous experimentation with similar boats. “SCAMP is number six in a series of very beamy, shallow-bodied boats with that distinctive high-positioned pram bow,” Welsford says. “Tender Behind, Tread Lightly, and Sherpa are the other designs that made it to plans. All work really well, can carry huge loads for their size, sail well, and are well balanced. I learned something from each of them, and SCAMP is a result of that learning.” Besides Welsford, boatbuilder/designer Kees Prins of Port Townsend, Brandon Davis of Turnpoint Design , and adventurer/prototype tester Howard Rice all contributed to final design details and kit elements for SCAMP.

SCAMP is built upright on its flat bottom, which serves as the base for an egg-crate arrangement of plywood that forms the boat’s furniture and structural members. No temporary molds or frames are used. It’s a method that makes for an exceptionally stiff hull, and a safe one—the completed “boxes” create six entirely separate buoyancy chambers within the glued-plywood lapstrake hull. Welsford reports that one SCAMP was able to remain comfortably afloat despite suffering “a hole in the side that you could put your head through” after hitting a snag. And although there are plenty of parts to assemble when building a SCAMP, no single step requires more than moderate woodworking skills and a selection of basic tools.

S CAMP is rigged with a single balanced lugsail, an excellent choice for a cruising rig that’s simple to handle and easy to reef. With 100 sq ft of sail and the stability to stand up to it, the boat also performs well. On my second sail in a SCAMP, working to windward on a gusty day, I was able to keep ahead of a 21′ Sea Pearl for several miles. SCAMP’s shallow draft and flat bottom make it a perfect gunkholer, and 173 lbs of water ballast (roughly 40 percent of the total hull weight) make it capable of much more. It’s no pulling boat, but SCAMP won’t be too difficult to move under oars when necessary. Some builders have considered experimenting with a single sculling oar at the transom; Dave Ender plans to try a yuloh. There’s room to mount a small outboard on the transom for backup propulsion.

Builders have the choice of building from plans or from a kit, with custom sails and hardware available for purchase. Another popular option for builders is the SCAMP Camp , a two-week intensive class in which participants come together to assemble their own SCAMP kits under the direction of designer John Welsford and prototype tester Howard Rice.

One unintended feature of the design deserves mention: several SCAMP builders I have met describe the boat as “a chick magnet,” and from my own observations at various messabouts and festivals, I’d say that such a claim is closer to reality than to hype. For potential builders with wives or girlfriends reluctant to take up sailing, this might be the single biggest advantage SCAMP has to offer.

A kick-up rudder allows sailing in shallow water and twin skegs help the SCAMP sit solidly upright when grounded.

A kick-up rudder allows sailing in shallow water and twin skegs help the SCAMP sit solidly upright when grounded.

B ack aboard Dave Ender’s Scamp, we were away from the dock with an easy shove, heading across Lake Pepin, a wide stretch of the Mississippi that’s often subject to strong winds sweeping down between tall bluffs. Dave filled the ballast tank under the cockpit sole. With the drain holes open, the tank floods itself almost completely; the top of the tank is a few inches above the waterline, so must be topped off by replacing the plugs and pouring water in with a bucket from the cockpit before sealing. He could pour water in quickly without worrying about spilling or overflowing: The excess water drains out of the cockpit’s scuppers. With the water ballast in, we soon shook out the reef we started with, and Dave put me at the tiller. It was a windy day, but even under full sail we continued on in perfect comfort. SCAMP may be a small boat, but it’s the biggest small boat I’ve ever sailed. In fact, it’s almost impossible to categorize SCAMP by size. It weighs just over 400 lbs empty, but has the cockpit and freeboard of a 20′ keelboat (in fact, the freeboard is so high that reboarding the boat without a pre-rigged foot stirrup or rudder step would be problematic). It’s easy to drag up a SCAMP onto a beach for a quick stop ashore, yet filling the ballast tank adds stability well beyond the reach of a typical small boat. The self-draining cockpit sits high enough above the water that you feel like you’re aboard a much bigger boat—yet SCAMP is extremely maneuverable, tacking easily and spinning around within its own length like the smallest dinghy.

While it performs well enough to keep experienced sailors interested—Dave and I kept pace with several much bigger keelboats without much trouble—SCAMP would also be a great boat for beginners to learn on. The balanced lug makes tacking or jibing very simple and stress-free; lazyjacks hold the sail and boom securely in place, making reefing easy once the lines and cleats are set up; the boat is stable and comfortable. And it’s pure fun to sail. The only thing that I needed some time to get used to was being so far from the water compared to the sail-and-oar boats I usually sail. Of course, that higher freeboard and greater volume help make it easy to recover from a capsize (see the video below). By the time Dave and I returned to the dock, I was reminded again of just how much I like this design, and how much it can do.

The diminutive SCAMP is easily trailered, rigged, and launched.

The diminutive SCAMP is easily trailered, rigged, and launched.

With its quick launching capabilities, SCAMP would work well as a family-friendly daysailer. There is space enough for four adults in relative comfort (three is better; two is luxurious), and the boat’s stability makes it a comfortable ride even for the elderly and infirm, young children, or passengers who might simply be a bit nervous around boats. The boom is high overhead, minimizing the risk of hitting an inexperienced passenger, and the seats are wide and comfortable.

Cruising solo or two-up is where SCAMP really shines. The 8′3″ x 29″ cockpit sole provides ample space for one person to sleep aboard very comfortably (the offset centerboard is hidden in the starboard seat face), and filler planks between seats can be used to create a double bunk. The benches themselves (6′8″ by 17.5″) offer a place to stretch out but aren’t quite wide enough for sleeping. There is plenty of stowage space under the seats and cockpit. The “veranda” (a small cuddy/locker at the forward end of the cockpit) provides additional stowage, sitting headroom, and shelter from the wind, as well as a convenient place to anchor the forward edge of a cockpit tent. Forward of the veranda’s bulkhead there are 8.5 cubic feet of sealed stowage that provide extra buoyancy well above the waterline, just where it would be most useful in a knockdown. And of course, like all small boats, a SCAMP can easily travel to windward at 60 mph, pulled on a small lightweight trailer by a small four-cylinder car.

scamp sailboat cruising

Tom Pamperin ( www.tompamperin.com ) is a frequent contributor to Small Boats Monthly and WoodenBoat.

SCAMP Particulars

LOA/11′11″ Beam/5′4″

Draft (board up)/7″ Weight (including rig)/420 lbs Water ballast/173 lbs

SCAMPSAILPLAN

Plans and information are available from Small Craft Advisor . Their YouTube channel has several videos featuring the SCAMP, including a capsize trial with Howard Rice, below.

Is there a boat you’d like to know more about? Have you built one that you think other Small Boats Monthly readers would enjoy? Please email us!

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Comments (4)

Great article! Thanks. I especially enjoyed the fact that during the capsize test, Howard did not lose his hat! Now that’s a sailor. I’ve always been off put by the punt bow, but seeing the boat in action, I can now appreciate it.

That boat did not want to capsize…

Thanks for the kind words about the article; I enjoyed yet another excuse to go sailing aboard a Scamp. It’s a fun and very very capable little boat, that’s for sure.

These are great wee boats, totally sold on the concept especially the seaworthiness. The only thing I would do differently is wear a safety harness in winds like that in the video! I could quite easily see the boat sailing off while you flounder around in the briny!

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scamp sailboat cruising

When I first saw a Scamp sailboat, I thought it looked like an oversized children’s bath toy. It seemed to bob around sitting too high in the water, and that snub nose made me feel that part of the boat was missing. But once aboard, the high sides created a dry ride and an atmosphere of safety. With a small cuddy forward, and lots of hatches for neatly stowing gear, it felt serene compared to some of the open boats I normally admire, where gear and stray equipment clutter their cockpits.

The Small Craft Advisor Magazine Project (better known as SCAMP) is an increasingly popular small sailboat that can be built from plans or a kit, as well as ordered as a ready to sail fiberglass model constructed locally by Gig Harbor Boat Works. With a 100-square-foot sail, and measuring just shy of 12 feet with a beam of about five feet, the boat seems like it shouldn’t sail well at all, but somehow it does.

I’ve been out on Scamps enough times to not be surprised by their abilities. For such a small boat, I’m continually impressed by how comfortable and spacious the seven-foot long cockpit, with benches lining each side, and the five-foot cuddy make the boat feel. If I was blindfolded at the helm of a Scamp and you asked me how big a boat I was steering, I’d say something long and steady — maybe 20 feet. After all, I’d be sitting straight up, with my legs down in a well, not scrunched up like most dinghies. The tiller in hand would feel steady, with no signs of the boat wiggling due to any slight inattention.

I wasn’t alone in finding the aesthetics of the hull curious. “I became interested in Scamps very slowly. At first I did not really care for them,” my pal Randy Wheating wrote by email. “However, my big Chebacco was being used less and less.”

Many people construct their own Scamps as part of a class. Friend and lifelong sailor, Dale Simonson, told me, “I sort of ended up with a Scamp by mistake. Or, more like by happenstance. I was planning (or dreaming about planning) to build a boat in a few years… when I stumbled onto an upcoming ‘Scamp Camp,’ a group build of ten boats. Ten students, four instructors, two weeks, and come home with your own boat!”

Dale noted, “I wasn’t totally enamored with the design until I started to really consider the value of the workshop, and getting such a good jumpstart on a build. It wasn’t until we got into the build, and all the ensuing discussions with the instructors (in particular, John Welsford the designer, and Howard Rice the adventure sailor), that I fell in love with the concept and the approach of the design as a very small vessel that is capable of cruising my local near-shore waters of the Salish Sea.”

For some Scamp sailors, the camaraderie is a big part of the appeal of the boat. There’s an active online community as well as Red Lantern rallies where scads of Scamps congregate. But that’s not true for everyone. Samantha Ritchie, the captain of a fiberglass Scamp named Kerfuffle observed, “the Scamp community is mostly older white men. I like older white men, but that’s not really my group, so I am not into the ‘community’ thing very much. That being said, I love seeing other Scamps and always go chat with the owners.”

But like other people, Samantha appreciates the balance of simplicity and function. “I am very comfortable in the Scamp, and it’s a low fuss kind of boat.  I am strong for a 65-year-old woman, but not as strong as I was 10 years ago. Despite that, I can easily put up the mast, pull the boat up on a beach, etc. No need for winches for any big jib — no jib!”

scamp sailboat cruising

I initially expected the Scamp to sail like a bulldozer, slogging along pushing water. In reality, it moves smoothly under sail and turns on a dime, making sailing out of a marina or around other tight places deceptively easy. With only one sail and a short waterline, making 360 degree penalty turns actually feels like fun. I will admit one fault about my crush — as I’ve sailed alongside my friends in their Scamps, they are gradually outpaced by all but the shortest hulls.

I’ve been out in Scamps in a big blow, but when filled with 175 pounds of water ballast (integrated into cavities in the hull), I’ve been impressed with how stable they were. But, it wouldn’t be a sailboat if you didn’t get scared from time to time and yes, despite the broad beam and reefable sail, I’ve seen them capsize. Still, the boat is self rightable and floats high enough to bail with a little effort.

scamp sailboat cruising

Besides being fun to sail, the Scamp is an able camp cruiser and despite its size, both Dale and Samantha have done overnight stints at anchor with their partners. Dale notes, “I think I’m a minimalist at heart, my wife and I lived in Volkswagen vans for two years, touring Europe and Australia. I love to row (and sail, even more) and don’t care much for motor boating. I have found backpacking, kayaking, camping, and living a bit ‘rough’ to be enjoyable… Big poofy pillows are allowed. Dutch ovens, too. It’s a very comfortable floating tent that turns into a kitchen, a lounge, and then a fun sailing machine… and fits in a single car garage.”

As I’ve started to play with the many strings and sticks attached to slightly larger boats, the simplicity of the Scamp keeps calling me. Sure I’d be slower and maybe not as sleek, but the comfort and adaptability of the Scamp in such a small package just keeps me smiling.

Bruce Bateau sails and rows traditional boats with a modern twist in Portland, Oregon. His stories and adventures can be found at www.terrapintales.wordpress.com.

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Bruce Bateau

Bruce Bateau sails and rows traditional boats with a modern twist in Portland, Ore. His stories and adventures can be found at www.terrapintales.wordpress.com

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Fiberglass SCAMP review in 48 North

by GHBoats Webmaster | Apr 12, 2014 | Press Reviews , SCAMP

scamp sailboat cruising

Our fiberglass SCAMP got a fantastic write-up in the April 2014 issue of 48 North !

Scamp reviewed by 48 North Magazine

It’s a pretty good sized article so we’re not going to reprint the whole thing here, but these are a few of our favorite parts:

  Gig Harbor Boat Works, known for their strong, esthetically pleasing rowing boats, has already shipped a number of the new SCAMPS all over the country and overseas. “The kit boat has a lot of intricate details that the home builder may not have the talent or tools to build,” says Dave Robertson, owner of GHB. “With the fiberglass version, they can enjoy using the boat right away.” The GHB boat is truly sail-away complete; from oars to sails.
There are many innovations designed into the SCAMP that make it truly a big little boat. One thing that usually takes up a lot of cockpit room of most small boats is the centerboard. The SCAMP’s centerboard, very heavy but swings up easily for trailer or grounding, is offset to starboard so that it doesn’t intrude into the cockpit. I’ll let you call Dave to explain the physics of the offset. Suffice it to say that we didn’t notice a difference on either tack. The result is it opens up the cockpit which feels more like that of a of a San Juan 24.
The boat was surprisingly quick and very stable. “This boat can’t be just 12’long,” I thought. I stood up and rocked it side to side with minimal affect. It felt like 20-footer.   Sailing the SCAMP made me a believer that it actually would be a safe and enjoyable way to explore the San Juans, as well as just knocking around the bay for a fun day of sailing. The SCAMP had lots of surprises, all good.   I have to say it’s the biggest little boat I’ve ever sailed.

You can download a PDF of the full review here:   48 North Scamp Review

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scamp sailboat cruising

In 2020, a new unusual racing machine HH 42 appeared in the Scamp Sailing crew. On this yacht, the crew wants to fight for the highest sports goals in the most famous international regattas in the coming seasons.

is a modern racing yacht designed by Javier Soto Acebal Naval Architects and built in 2011 in the Argentinean shipyard M Boats. In the SCAMP 27 crew resources he sailed in 2018/2019. At that time, the crew won the national regatta and reached for the most important trophy in their achievements so far - the ORC European Championship Bronze Medal.

Reichel Pugh 44

The yacht Scamp One was built in 1986 as a 44-foot boat, the largest at the time, representative of the very popular overseas construction Reichel-Pugh. The yacht has a very rich and successful racing history. In 1987, under the name Sidewinder, she took part in the prestigious Admiral's Cup. The unit, commanded by John Bertrand, easily defeated all rivals in her class. In the Scamp One crew resources he sailed in the years 2015/2016/2017 where he won and stood on the podium of many marine regattas held on the Baltic Sea.

scamp sailboat cruising

PRINCIPLE DIMENSIONS

  • 2,8 m Draft
  • 4.95 t Displacement
  • 106 sqm Sail Area Upwind
  • 245 sqm Sail Area Downwind
  • 18,71 m ISP

The HH 42 is a 12 meter, fully optimized very high performance racing yacht.

Designed by world renowned judel/vrolijk & co, the HH 42 is simply made to be the fastest in its size around the race track, yet be competitively raced to win on IRC as well as ORC and HPR.

The boat is a place of work for 12 members crew during the inshore races and 10 members during the offshore ones.

HH 42 designed to be extremely fast, very affordable and to rate well under IRC, HPR, ORC, as well as others, this is a no compromise. 100% prepared carbon fiber racing machine from the world’s best IRC race boat designer Judel Vrolijk. With the HH42, JV has completely satisfied the design brief and met every challenge they were given. Join those already at the head of the fleet.

Scamp Sailing Team is a group of highly talented professional and semi-professional sailors based in Poland. During the 2019 season the team entered the European ORC Championship held in Oxelosund, Sweden, competing against some of the Europe’s best sailors. We returned home with 3rd place overall in the highest ranked group A. Later that season we won everything that the Polish coast had to offer in terms of regattas. Determined to improve on this, the team’s main goal is to create a highly competitive professional campaign for the 2021 season.

Scamp Sailing Team has exciting new ideas on how it would like to move forward and is able to offer its sponsors the opportunity to capitalize on truly global sailing campaigns and get involved with one of the most exciting teams in sailing and share in their adventure and drive to be the very best!

scamp sailboat cruising

Jakub Marciniak Boat Captain

scamp sailboat cruising

Grzegorz Goździk Bowman

scamp sailboat cruising

Kuba Jankowski Trymer

scamp sailboat cruising

Witold Karałow Skipper / Co-founder

scamp sailboat cruising

Maciej Gnatowski Trymer Skipper / Co-founder

scamp sailboat cruising

Andrzej Brochocki Trymer, Grinder / Co-founder

scamp sailboat cruising

Maciej Ślusarek Pitman

scamp sailboat cruising

Piotr Obidziński Trymer, Grinder

scamp sailboat cruising

Artur Manista Pitman

scamp sailboat cruising

Our boat will be competing against some of the most renowned sailors in the most prestigious regattas around the world. This will create an opportunity for the sponsors to have maximum global brand exposure.

Below is the list of all the major global races we intend to compete in:

  • Palmavela – Palma de Mallorca 30.04 – 08.05
  • IRC European Championship – Cannes 29.05 – 04.06
  • Rolex Giraglia – St.Tropez /Genova 10.06 – 17.06
  • Les Voiles de Saint Tropez – St.Tropez 30.09 – 07.10
  • Rolex Middle Sea Race – Malta – 21.10 – 28.10

Join the crew and experience unforgettable emotions on board the racing yacht HH 42. Under the watchful eye of professional sailors you will gain experience in competing with the best sailors and the fastest yachts in the world.

scamp sailboat cruising

Polska załoga trzecia w Europie

scamp sailboat cruising

Duży sukces polskich żeglarzy. Brązowy medal mistrzostw Europy

scamp sailboat cruising

Świetny występ Polaków w prestiżowych regatach na Morzu Liguryjskim. "Mamy to"

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Załoga jachtu SCAMP 3 rozpoczęła kampanię udziału w najważniejszych międzynarodowych regatach żeglarskich w sezonie 2021/2022.

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Scamp Sailing Team – historia powstania zespołu i plany na 2020/2022

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Zwycięstwo i rekord trasy Scamp Team w Maristo Cup

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Za nami 69. Błękitna Wstęga Zatoki Gdańskiej

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Żeglarskie rekordy Sailing Poland Team i Scamp Sailing Team na Bałtyku

scamp sailboat cruising

Załoga polskiego jachtu Scamp 27 zdobyła brązowy medal mistrzostw Europy ORC!

scamp sailboat cruising

SCAMP 27 brązowym medalistą mistrzostw Europy ORC!

scamp sailboat cruising

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©Copyright 2020 Scamp. All rights reserved.

Born: 1992 Turned pro: 2010 Dinghy: 2010-2015 Polish National Team 2x National Championship medalists Finn, Laser 3x Junior National Campion Laser, Finn 2x 4th place Junior European Championship Finn 2x Europa Cup medalists Laser, Finn Inshore/Offshore since 2016 Navigator, Tactician & Mainsail Trimmer 3x Atlantic crossing (VO70) ORC National Champion 3rd place ORC Europeans 2nd place Caribbean 600 1st place St Marteen Regatta More than 40 inshore/ offshore regattas Specialization in boat electric/electronics works (incl. university degree in engineering)

Born: 1991 Turned pro: 2011 Dinghy: 2011 – 2013 University Champion and Medalists on Omega 2013-2016- Member of Polish National team 49er Inshore/Offshore since 2016 Bowman on VO70, Soto40, HH42, Swan50 (also skipper) 3x Atlantic crossing (VO70) 1st place Rolex Middlesea Race 2nd place Caribbean 600 1st place St Marteen Regatta ORC National Champion 3rd place ORC Europeans More than 30 inshore/offshore races Specialization in boat maintenance and mast trimming

Born: 1986 Turned pro: 2003 Dinghy: Medialist of Championships of Poland in Laser 4.7 Later moved to Australia to sail on skiff 18ft, 4 times at World Championships on Moth, Laser Radial, 18ft Skiff, Tasar. Inshore/Offshore since 2016 Trimmer on VO70, Soto40, HH42, L30 3rd place ORC Europeans 2nd place Caribbean 600 1st place St Marteen Regatta 5th place Europeans L30 More than 30 races including 2 times Rolex Sydney-Hobart Yacht Race Specialization in boat&team logistics (incl. university degree in management)

The Crowded Planet

Russian River Cruise – Waterways of the Tsars

Updated December 14, 2017

// By Margherita

Back to Russia! Did you follow our Russian river cruise in August and September? We travelled between Moscow and St Petersburg on the Waterways of the Tsars Viking River Cruise – here’s what we got up to!

russian river cruise viking ship

We both share a deep connection with Russia. I was named after the heroine of Master and Margarita , one of the best Russian books of the 20th century. Nick is actually of Russian ancestry – his maternal great-grandparents were from St Petersburg, and spent the best part of 50 years wandering around Europe escaping wars and revolutions, before settling in Australia .

russia volga river church

Russia has been at the top of our travel dreams for several years , but somehow something always came up whenever we made plans to visit. Once we couldn’t get a visa on time. Another time we couldn’t get time off. Winter is too cold, summer is too hot.

st petersburg hermitage square high

This year, Russia was one of our travel resolutions . Our desire was for the trip to be special – something different from what we’d done so far. We wanted a higher level of comfort, help with visa arrangements, and a trip that would help us understand the country we longed to visit for so many years . The Waterways of the Tsars river cruise with Viking ticked all boxes, so we made arrangements for a departure from Moscow in late August.

russia volga river lock

Things to Know Before a Russian River Cruise with Viking

When we announced our friends we would be travelling on a Russian river cruise , some of them were really surprised. A CRUISE? You guys are such hardcore independent travellers! What are you doing ON A CRUISE with all those OLD PEOPLE? True, the average age on a Viking river cruise might be a fair bit higher than 35 – but really, who is to say we wouldn’t enjoy the experience?

russian night viking river cruises

This awesome post by One Modern Couple  really nails the point – a Viking river cruise is an experience that can be enjoyed by people of all ages. In their words ‘River cruises are cultural, experiential, educational and scenic. Enjoy the ride, take in the surroundings, learn about the countries you are visiting – from history to local life, food to language – and experience the destinations in a thoughtful way.’ 

Whether you’re 30, 60 or 90, it doesn’t really matter.

russian river cruise sunset

Secondly,  who’s to say that travelling in a group is not ‘real’ travel? We have always been (and continue to be) lovers of independent travel, but sometimes you just can’t beat the insights given to you by a local guide . Viking River Cruises offer plenty of guided tours included in the cruise price, all led by experienced local guides.

russia river cruise out of moscow

Meals were always excellent – breakfast and lunch included a combination of buffet and à la carte specialties, while dinner was always à la carte. Every day we were given the choice to sample some Russian specialties, like beef stroganoff, borsch, pelmeni, solyanka and lots of delicious desserts.

russian night menu viking river cruise

Another great plus of a Russian river cruise with Viking is that during sailing time lots of cultural activities are on offer – things like cooking demonstrations, Russian language lessons and lectures about Russian history and culture, led by the local tour escorts who were with us for the whole duration of the trip. On top of that, every day we received a briefing detailing the following day’s activities, optional excursions and that night’s menu.

russia mandrogy crazy clouds

Whenever we passed points of interest on the boat, such as Mother Volga statue or the sunken Kalyazin Cathedral, we were always called out on the loudspeaker to make sure we wouldn’t miss them. There was no pressure to join in any of the activities – we could spend the whole day chilling on the deck or on our veranda, looking at the beautiful colourful churches built on the riverbank, surrounded by nothing but nature.

russia volga river

Waterways of the Tsars – the Itinerary

The Waterways of the Tsars cruise is 13 days long, starting either in Moscow or in St. Petersburg . Most Russian river cruises had always been described to me as ‘Volga Cruises’ – in fact, our boat cruised along a variety of waterways, including the Moscow Canal, the Volga-Baltic Waterway, the Rybinsk Reservoir, Lake Onega and Ladoga (the two largest lakes in Europe) and the Neva River (the shortest in Europe!)

Here’s a map to give you an idea of the route.

viking-waterways-czars-map

Days 1-4 Moscow

Three days were barely enough to get an idea of how amazing Moscow is. Our days were packed from morning to night with tours and activities – from visiting Moscow must visits like Red Square, the Kremlin, the Moscow Metro and the Arbat, to quirky locations like the Museum of Cosmonautics , located in one of Moscow’s best districts for Communist architecture (one of our passions!)

st-basil-close-moscow

Even though our itinerary was packed full, we managed to spend half a day touring Moscow independently , visiting some of the sights mentioned in The Master and Margarita – Patriarch’s Ponds, both Bulgakov Museums and Sparrow Hill. Let’s just say that we need to get back to Moscow soon to explore more! Meanwhile, here’s our things to do in Moscow for first timers article, detailing our Moscow visit with Viking.

moscow metro revolutsia

Day 5 Uglich

After setting sail from Moscow, our first stop was Uglich , a cute town on the Volga River, famous for its pretty churches and for being the location of one of the darkest chapters in Russian history .

russia cruise uglich

After the death of Ivan the Terrible, his youngest son and heir to the throne Dmitry was exiled to Uglich, where he was murdered at the age of 10. Suspicion fell on the tsar’s chief advisor, but Dmitry’s cause of death (i.e. throat slitting) was ruled to be an accident. This episode started a period of political unsettlement, that ended with the start of the Romanov dynasty.

We spent an afternoon around Uglich , starting with a home visit of a local family where we had the chance to try homemade grain vodka (the best we’ve had in Russia) and a variety of pickled vegetables, tea and cakes. Then, we toured the Kremlin – the word ‘kremlin’ actually means fortified city, and several Russian cities have one. Moscow’s Kremlin just happens to be the best known!

russia cruise uglich kremlin

Day 6 Yaroslavl

The following morning we reached Yaroslavl , a much larger city compared to Uglich. It looked like the perfect Russian city – large enough not to get bored (there was even a cat cafe!) but small enough not to get frustrated with the traffic and crowds found in Moscow or St. Petersburg.

russia market yaroslavl

Our Yaroslavl visit was centred around four points of interest . The centre of Yaroslavl is located on the Strelka, a promontory formed at the confluence of the Volga and Kotorosl rivers. Our first stop was the covered market , where we tasted some local products, and then we headed to the Church of Elijah the Prophet , where we had a guided tour (and played with some cute cats). Afterwards, we visited the Governor’s Mansion , now an art gallery. We were welcomed by some beautiful ladies in period costumes, and treated to a music concert. Our final stop was the Yaroslavl Kremlin , where we admired the façade of the Dormition Cathedral, destroyed by the Bolsheviks and rebuilt and reopened in 2010 in time for Yaroslavl’s millennium celebrations.

yaroslavl governor mansion

Before heading back to the ship, we stopped at the lookout over the Millennium of Yaroslavl Park at the end of the Strelka – the flowerbed right in the centre displays a bear (Yaroslavl’s coat of arms) and the city’s age – 1006 at the time of our visit. Looking good!

yaroslavl millennuim park

Day 7 Kuzino

Kuzino is a small village in in the middle of nowhere – we visited on a chilly and rainy morning, to visit the stunning Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery , the largest in Europe. The Monastery is surrounded by walls and located on the shores of Severskoye Lake, with waters so pure that boat traffic is prohibited.

russia kirillo belozersky monastery

Kirillo-Belozersky was founded at the end of the 14th century, and had its heyday between the 15th and 17th century, when Russia’s tsars and noblemen (including Ivan the Terrible!) paid frequent visits and showered the monks with icons and precious gifts. Luckily the Bolsheviks spared the monastery from destruction, turning it into a museum instead. The day we visited was the feast of the Assumption and the churches were crowded with locals, but we had a lovely guided tour of the museum and time to appreciate its beautiful icons.

russia kirillo belozersky monastery inside

Day 8 Kizhi (Sailing)

Whenever travelling, you always need a plan B. Autumn was well on its way by the time we reached the northernmost section of our cruise, and we were held at a lock for the best part of one night due to thick fog . This meant we had to sail the whole day and miss out on Kizhi , a tiny island on the northern side of Onega Lake, famous for its spectacular wooden churches.

kizhi

We were all disappointed when boat staff made the announcement – personally, Kizhi was one of the stops I was looking forward to the most, after reading about it on the Guardian and knowing that the site is very difficult to visit without a river cruise. However, we didn’t mind too much because we were both suffering the consequences of the previous night’s vodka tasting , organised by Frank, the hotel manager who also happened to be a real vodka connoisseur!

viking river vodka night

Viking staff were really amazing at keeping us busy during the sailing day with activities like guided tours to the wheelhouse, the room where the captain and sailors pilot the ship.

viking truvor wheelhouse

Day 9 Mandrogy

The last stop before reaching St. Petersburg was Mandrogy , a village on the banks of the Svir River, built in 1996 as a replica of a village destroyed during WW2. A Russian businessman had the idea of ‘rebuilding’ Mandrogy to provide a stop to river cruise passengers before reaching St. Petersburg. So, the village is not actually ‘real’ – it’s more of an open air museum. Cute little painted houses were built around a little forest, with people in traditional dress showcasing traditional crafts and selling souvenirs.

russia mandrogy

Those in search of souvenirs loved Mandrogy – the quality of matrioshka dolls, icons and other handicrafts was far higher than anywhere else we had been. We are not into souvenirs, but if there was a place to get something, Mandrogy would be it. The village was pretty, but it felt a bit fake for us – kind of like a tourist amusement park. Which in a way, it is.

russia mandrogy artist

However, we did enjoy Mandrogy for two reasons – the first was the chance to attend matrioshka painting workshop  where we decorated our own matrioshka dolls. That’s the best kind of souvenir in my opinion! The second was the delicious piroshki place where we had some delicious buttery pastries filled with green onion and egg. Just ask Viking staff and they’ll point you the way to the piroshki place!

russia mandrogy matrioska workshop

Days 10-13 St. Petersburg

After 6 days spent cruising, covering a distance of 1800 kilometers, we made it to Saint Petersburg . We had three gorgeous sunny days, and the city dazzled us with its beauty and artistic wealth – after all, it’s UNESCO-listed ! There’s no way I can convey everything we saw and did in three days in just a couple of paragraphs, so watch this space – a St. Petersburg article is coming soon!

st petersburg hermitage square

There are several St. Petersburg experiences already included by Viking in the tour price – a visit to the Hermitage Museum, a ballet performance, a visit to Catherine Palace in the village of Pushkin and a St. Petersburg city tour, either on foot or by bus. On top of that, we also joined some optional tours – a river cruise, a morning tour to amazing Peterhof Palace and my very own favourite, a Cossack performance!

st petersburg spilled blood church

Things to Know Before Travelling to Russia

  • Make sure you sort out your Russian Visa on time . Viking Cruises helps with an invitation letter that you can use to apply for your own Russian visa at your closest consulate – the process is pretty straightforward, provided you are applying in your own country, and takes approximately 2-3 weeks.
  • You can also ask Viking to sort out your Russian visa for an additional charge . This is especially convenient if you live in the US or if your hometown doesn’t have a Russian consulate.
  • River cruises of Russia only run between April and October, when the waterways are not frozen. The weather can be change dramatically between Moscow and Saint Petersburg , the latter usually being much colder than the former. Make sure you check the weather reports before packing!
  • English isn’t widely spoken around Russia , not even in the main cities. If you’re planning to spend some time travelling independently, learning a bit of Russian is a VERY good idea. The Russian language classes we had on board came in very handy!
  • Russia’s currency is the rouble , which fluctuates quite a bit. Larger cities are full of moneychangers, and some souvenir shops (like those in Mandrogy) also accept euro and USD.

russia mother volga statue

We would like to thank Viking Cruises for having welcomed us aboard the Waterways of the Tsars cruise.

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2 thoughts on “Russian River Cruise – Waterways of the Tsars”

Truly amazing place & photography! I loved the view of church of the Savior on Spilled Blood, looks awesome. I enjoyed reading. Thanks for sharing your experience.

Thank you for reading! It was a fab trip!

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Moscow to Saint Petersburg

13 days – 12 nights

Moscow to St. Petersburg

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Moscow

Gold, Platinum  Airport transfer / Check-in at centrally located Marriott Aurora***** or Ararat Park Hyatt*****

Imperial : Private airport transfer / Check-in at the luxurious Four Seasons Moscow***** only a minute from the Kremlin and Red Square

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Volga dream experience:

Moscow

Gold: City Tour / Novodevichy Cemetery Imperial, Platinum:  City tour / Lunch in a Moscow City Skyscraper / Novodevichy Cemetery / Sparrow Hills

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Meals: Breakfast

Platinum / Imperial

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Meals: Breakfast, Lunch

Moscow

Gold:  Moscow Kremlin / Armory Museum / Red Square / GUM Department Store

Platinum:  Moscow Kremlin / Armory Museum / Red Square / St. Basil’s Cathedral / GUM Department Store / Park Zaryadye

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Gold:  Tretyakov Gallery / Moscow Metro Tour.

Platinum:  Leo Tolstoy House-Museum in Hamovniki / Tretyakov Gallery / Moscow Metro Tour.

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Meals: Breakfast, Dinner

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Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Uglich

Gold, Platinum:  Town of Uglich / Church of St. Dmitri-on-the-Blood

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Volga dream experience: Costumed Russian Tea Ceremony & Russian Cooking Class

Yaroslavl

Gold, Platinum:  Yaroslavl City Tour / Governor’s house 

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Volga dream experience: Sun Deck Barbeque

Goritsy

Gold:  Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery  

Platinum:  Ferapontov Monastery

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Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Russian Dinner with Vodka Tasting

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Gold, Platinum: Kizhi Island / Lake Onega

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Volga dream experience: Piano Concert – Compositions by Tchaikovsky and Rakhmaninov

Svirstroy

Gold, Platinum:  Svirstroy village / Local resident’s home / Local primary school

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Volga dream experience: Farewell Dinner, Captain’s cocktail

St. Petersburg

Gold:  City Tour / Peter and Paul Fortress

Platinum:  City Tour / St. Isaac’s Cathedral / Canal boat / Yusupov Palace

scamp sailboat cruising

Gold:  The State Hermitage Museum / Peterhof: Park and a historic Cottage

Platinum:  The State Hermitage Museum (Early Entrance!) / Gold Room / Peterhof: Park and a historic Cottage

scamp sailboat cruising

Gold:  Catherine’s Palace / Amber Room

Platinum:  Faberge Museum / Catherine’s Palace / Amber Room

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Meals: Breakfast / Imperial

scamp sailboat cruising

Gold, Platinum, Imperial: Check-out / Airport transfer

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Volga dream experience: -

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KSHB - Kansas City, Missouri

Ahead of 2024 Olympics, Jacomo Sailing Club gives a look inside the water sport

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BLUE SPRINGS, Mo. — When the 2024 Paris Olympics kicks off in 32 days, one event viewers can enjoy is sailing.

Sailing is also something Kansas Citians can watch and try for themselves at local lakes.

The Jacomo Sailing Club calls Lake Jacomo in Eastern Jackson County home and has since the lake’s creation in 1958. The club has around 125 members.

Erin Doughty is the community relations chair for Jacomo Sailing Club. She first learned to sail six years ago at Shawnee Mission Park through Johnson County Parks and Recreation.

Doughty said she loves the peaceful nature of being out on the water.

“So there is just the camaraderie about all the other sailors. Every time you go out and sail you're going to learn something new, right?" she said. "I can have sailed this boat for 20 or 50 different times, but the winds gonna change, everything's going to be a little different, and you still learn more about yourself and about the boat."

Erin Doughty with Jacomo Sailing Club

That is one thing that makes sailing special, according to the club’s membership director Lexi Brooks.

Brooks grew up on the water sailing. She said it is a sport that requires community, trust and attention to the water, which she said she wants people to remember when watching sailing in Marseille.

“Just how quickly their mind works. Sailing is a really interesting sport because part of it is the incredible athleticism but part of it is making tactical decisions really fast based on what the wind and what the water is doing," Brooks said. "And so watching them make those decisions so quickly is incredible."

Lexi Brooks with Jacomo Sailing Club

There are 10 Olympic sailing events this summer , with two new events — windsurfer-iQFoil and kiteboarding.

While the professionals are competing for gold on the Mediterranean, you can see races at Lake Jacomo this summer. Races are on Sundays.

If you want to try sailing, reach out to Jacomo Sailing Club or Johnson County Sailing Society.

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Russian Tours and Cruises from Express to Russia

  • Moscow St. Petersburg Cruise

Moscow Cruise Route

Frequently asked questions from our travelers, what is the best time of the year to go on a moscow - st. petersburg river cruise.

The cruises are operated from the month of May until the beginning of fall. The best weather conditions during this period are usually from June through late July, but if you are looking for a trip at a more relaxed pace with less tourists in the cities on the route, we highly recommend to take a look at the months of May and September.  For more info, please see our useful tips .

Which cities and towns will I visit on a Moscow - St. Petersburg cruise?

The cruise itinerary covers all the main and the most important locations on the route. During the cruise you will have a chance to get acquainted not only with Moscow and St. Petersburg, but also with smaller towns and villages like Goritsy, Kizhi, Yaroslavl, Mandrogui. The number of cities and towns to be visited and the exact itinerary vary depending on the duration of the cruise.

Is it better to start the cruise in Moscow or in St. Petersburg?

The starting point of the cruise is totally up to you. You won’t miss any important sights whether you start the cruise in Moscow or in St. Petersburg. We always recommend checking the flight schedules from your city first in order to decide whether it is more convenient for you to fly into Moscow or St Petersburg.

A Russian Land Tour or a River cruise - which is better?

This decision completely depends on your preferred way of travelling. During the Russian river cruise you will not only visit the two largest cities of Russia, but also small towns and villages along the route and you will have a chance to participate in master classes, learn a little Russian language and dive into local Russian culture and hospitality. For those who prefer custom-made programs and more free time in the cities of their choice we recommend a land tour, both are excellent options. To find out more about the differences click here .

Do I need a visa for a Russian River Cruise?

If your citizenship is not on the list of countries with visa-free access to Russia, you will need a valid Russian visa. Please make sure to start the process in a timely manner, so as to avoid any last-minute pressure. More details on Russian Visas can be found here .

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Frugal Traveler

Affordable Island-Hopping in Croatia? What Could Go Wrong?

A 30-percent-off Black Friday sale on a cruise aboard a yacht meant off-season sailing and being prepared for the unexpected.

A view from a hill of a red-roofed town surrounding a harbor. In the foreground, the ruins of an ancient fortification wall follow the downward slope of a steep hill. And in the distance, beyond the harbor with its numerous small boats, is a string of small green islands.

By Elaine Glusac

Elaine Glusac is the Frugal Traveler columnist, focusing on budget-friendly tips and journeys.

As Croatians tell the story , the Greek hero Odysseus was shipwrecked and held captive on the Croatian island of Mljet. Visiting in May, I and six other sailors embraced the myth when the motor on our 54-foot yacht failed.

“Remember, Odysseus spent seven years on Mljet,” said Ivan Ljubovic, our captain. “We can do two nights.”

In the scheme of things, the clogged fuel filter that impeded our progress on a seven-night, island-hopping cruise from Split to Dubrovnik on a yacht — which the passengers helped sail — was minor. Though an engine, even on a sailboat, is vital for docking and sticking to schedules on becalmed days, most of my shipmates agreed that getting waylaid in a village with Roman ruins on a turquoise bay was an acceptable fate.

I had been resigned to what were, in my mind, worse inconveniences when I had signed up for the trip last November. Then, the tour operator G Adventures had put several trips on sale over the Black Friday weekend. Its best deals were in the off-season, which meant potentially chilly weather and closed restaurants and attractions. But leaving in late April for seven nights of island hopping at roughly $1,300 — after a 30 percent discount — was too tempting to pass up.

My cousin Kim agreed and we made plans to pack rain gear and meet in Split to test the budget waters.

‘Everything between is an adventure’

Little about the itinerary was published pre-departure and none of it was firm.

“Split and Dubrovnik are fixed,” said the captain, who would pilot the ship solo and double as our guide, on our first day. “Everything between is an adventure.”

It started with the Sauturnes, a handsome Kufner yacht with four snug guest cabins, four economical bathrooms where the retractable faucet doubled as a shower spigot, and a spacious galley. Our “crew,” a mix of Australians and Americans ranging from 18 to 75 — all of whom had also jumped on the promotional pricing — spent most of the time atop the boat, where foam mattresses invited sunbathing and a cockpit awning provided shade.

The weather, which turned out to be sunny and comfortably cool, was not our greatest concern. The G Adventures website had mentioned well-known islands, including beachy Brac and Vis , which played a convincing Greek idyll in the movie “Mamma Mia 2.” But since many places would be closed in the shoulder season, we would proceed, according to the captain, based on the dictates of the weather and conditions on shore.

Meals were not included, which meant finding open restaurants was critical. For shipboard breakfasts and lunches, we each chipped in 50 euros (about $54) for communal groceries, which we shopped for at local markets. At night, we would dine at restaurants; G Adventures advised budgeting $250 to $325 for the week, which was accurate, though we often splurged on Croatian wine (a carafe of house red averaged $15).

Small ports

After the frenzy of grocery shopping and moving into the bunk-bedded cabin Kim and I shared, we experienced the Zen of sailing as the ship set off on a sunny morning for 43-mile-long Hvar , the longest and purportedly sunniest island in Croatia.

Neighboring islands drifted past as the wind patterned the sea in shifting ripples and ruffles. A flock of shearwaters soared by at eye level.

Within a few hours, the ridgelines of steep Hvar appeared, revealing terraced lavender fields and olive orchards. Motoring down a long, narrow inlet, we arrived in Stari Grad , a village of stone homes with terra cotta roof tiles, as travelers had since 384 B.C., when Greek sailors from the island of Paros settled here.

Our mooring provided a front-row view of fishing boats and cafes animating the waterfront. Stari Grad’s attractions, including the Greek ruins of Faros and a 17th-century Venetian cathedral, had yet to open for the season, but we relished exploring the old quarter’s narrow lanes and deserted plazas.

From the waterfront, an aerobic 20-minute hike up a steep hill crowned by a giant white cross offered views over Stari Grad and the plains beyond, a UNESCO World Heritage Site of fourth-century agricultural fields, with stone walls circumscribing grapevines and olive orchards.

That evening, we visited them to reach Konoba Kokot , a farm restaurant that specializes in “peka,” a kind of barbecue in which meat cooks under an iron lid piled with hot coals. The family that runs it opened in the preseason, welcoming us with bracing shots of rakija, a local herbal liquor. At a long table under an arbor, we gorged on homemade goat cheese, wild boar pate and, from the hearth, roast lamb, veal and octopus with limitless jugs of red and white wine for 35 euros a person.

Starry nights

Small ships are unmatched at getting into small ports, but a yacht trip is also a little like camping, starting most mornings with D.I.Y. instant coffee. Marinas offered free bathhouses with showers.

Cool temperatures apparently deterred the celebrity-filled mega yachts, which are known to anchor in the town of Hvar on the south shore of Hvar island. Our captain declared it the “Mykonos of Croatia” as we motored by the port bustling with visitors carrying shopping bags and cones of gelato.

With clear weather in the forecast, we moored in an undeveloped cove east of town. The mooring belonged to the owners of Moli Onte restaurant, who ferried us to land on a motorized dingy, allowing us enough time before dinner to visit the fortress above Hvar and have an Ozujsko beer on St. Stephens Square, the largest in the region of Dalmatia.

Back on board, with no artificial light to wash out the night sky, we hit the upper deck for stargazing. As my shipmates peeled off to bed, I grabbed a blanket and beanie and bedded down under the stars for the evolving show, periodically waking to catch the drama of the moon rising, reflected in the still water.

Little Dubrovnik

Fingers of gray rock reached down to meet sloping vineyards along Hvar’s south coast as we departed for its neighbor, Korcula. On our longest day of sailing, five hours, I welcomed the chance to play first mate, manning the lines on the jib sail.

To break up the trip, Captain Ljubovic navigated to a quiet cove off the Peljesac Peninsula where the Caribbean-blue waters, cloudless sky and sandy bottom convinced us to jump in despite numbing sea temperatures.

Fifteenth-century walls ring the historic center of Korcula, earning it the nickname “Little Dubrovnik.” Past the stone gates carved with a winged lion representing the empire of Venice, which controlled much of the Adriatic after the 13th century, narrow alleys led to ornate churches and mansions. There was no better history trip than getting lost in the web of pedestrian lanes. Or so we told ourselves as we passed the purported home of Marco Polo, still closed preseason.

Along the seafront walls, restaurants served pizza and seafood under lights strung in the pines and we caught sunset from a former turret, now converted into Massimo Cocktail Bar , which requires patrons to climb a ladder to the rooftop, a caution against second rounds.

The most romantic port of the trip was also the rowdiest, at least in the marina, which was hosting a Polish sailing regatta. When I headed for the showers at 6 a.m. the next morning, I found a group still cheerfully dancing atop a yacht littered in empty booze bottles and crushed potato chips.

Marooned on Mljet

We left Korcula on strong 20-knot “jugo” or south winds and Captain Ljubovic unleashed the sails, saying “You paid for a sailing vacation, not a motorboat.”

As we tacked back and forth toward Mljet , the boat heeled at a queasy angle and we took face shots of ocean spray.

On Mljet, where the western end of the island is home to Mljet National Park , we rented bikes (10 euros) to ride a lung-busting route over the park’s mountain spine. On the other side, we cycled around a pair of inland lakes and took a boat trip to a 12th-century monastery built on an island in one of them (park admission, 15 euros).

Docked in the still sleepy town of Polace, we heard tales of high season, when up to 100 yachts anchor in the bay and members of the band U2 were once seen biking in the park. After a brief shower, the town glimmered at sunset and the restaurant Stella Maris welcomed us with grilled sea bass (25 euros) and prawns (20 euros).

“I’m so glad I chose this time, because I don’t do crowds,” said my shipmate Nova Hey, 46, of Sydney, who was traveling with her 18-year-old daughter.

In the morning, I had the trail to the peak of Montokuc to myself. The roughly three-mile round-trip hike reached one of the highest points on the island, a rocky knob with stunning panoramas shared by a family of feral goats.

Not long thereafter, the Sauternes’ engine refused to turn over, stranding us in a national park on a remote island with no mechanics.

Teeming Dubrovnik

The next morning, Captain Ljubovic jimmied a fix but it didn’t last long and the engine died again, this time just opposite a cave on Mljet that we joked had to be the refuge of Odysseus.

After a morning of light sailing, a mechanic from the mainland arrived by speedboat and within an hour we were motoring toward the Franjo Tudman Bridge that spans the inlet to the Dubrovnik marina where hot showers awaited.

“Dubrovnik is the most expensive city in Croatia,” said Captain Ljubovic as we spent the last of our pooled money, 70 euros, hiring a taxi van to get us to and from the walled heart of the ancient city about 15 minutes away.

With two large cruise ships in port, Dubrovnik was teeming with visitors and the price to climb the stone walls that encircle the city was a sticker-shocking 35 euros. (In the ensuing two days Kim and I would spend post-cruise in the city, we bought the more comprehensive Dubrovnik Pass for 35 euros that included admission to the walls as well as several museums and public bus transportation.)

On our final evening, we measured the lack of crowds versus closed museums; perfect hiking weather versus swim-inviting water; ample dock space versus more restaurant choices — and felt we’d come out ahead sailing in the bargain season.

Follow New York Times Travel on Instagram and sign up for our weekly Travel Dispatch newsletter to get expert tips on traveling smarter and inspiration for your next vacation. Dreaming up a future getaway or just armchair traveling? Check out our 52 Places to Go in 2024 .

Open Up Your World

Considering a trip, or just some armchair traveling here are some ideas..

52 Places:  Why do we travel? For food, culture, adventure, natural beauty? Our 2024 list has all those elements, and more .

Ljubljana, Slovenia:  Stroll along the river, explore a contemporary art scene and admire panoramic views in this scenic Central European capital .

Cities With Great Beaches:  Already been to Miami, Honolulu and Sydney? These five other coastal destinations  are vibrant on land and on the water.

Southern France:  The Canal du Midi traverses the Occitanie region and gives cyclists of all skill levels  access to parts of France that are rich in lore .

Port Antonio, Jamaica:  The D.J. and music producer Diplo recommends spots in a city he loves  on Jamaica’s northeast coast. A dance party makes the cut.

New Mexico:  Visiting the vast and remote Gila Wilderness, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary, is both inspiring and demanding .

Screen Rant

What happened to mads herrera after below deck sailing yacht season 4.

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20 Best Reality TV Shows Right Now

I don't think below deck sailing yacht is returning (or at least not for a while), what happened to lucy edmunds after below deck sailing yacht season 4.

  • Mads Herrera continues to seek adventure after her Below Deck Sailing Yacht debut season.
  • Mads stood out on Below Deck Sailing Yacht Season 4 with her adventurous personality.
  • Mads, a yachtie, loves to work by the water and document her travels on Instagram.

Mads Herrera has continued seeking adventure after Below Deck Sailing Yacht . The Below Deck spin-off premiered in 2020, offering a fresh extension to the show’s classic format . Below Deck Sailing Yacht follows the crew and its captain, Glenn Shephard. With four seasons under its belt, the series has introduced many franchise yachties throughout its tenure. Mads debuted on the show during Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 4 where she worked as a stew underneath Daisy Kelliher, the chief Stew . Daisy was a beloved crew member, but Mads was the breakout star of the season.

Mads had an adventurous personality that helped her stand out among the Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 4 cast. As a freshman Below Deck yachtie, she made her mark on the series and had fun while doing so. She was involved in an infamous boatmance with Gary King that occupied most of the drama throughout the charter season. Nonetheless, Mads kept things casual with the Bosun , which allowed her to enjoy her time during the charter season. Since appearing on Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 4, Mads has continued living her life to the fullest.

Reality TV is more popular than ever. With so many to choose from, here are some of the best reality TV shows to stream or watch right now.

Mads Still Seems To Work In Yachting

Mads loves to work by the water.

Since her stint on the Below Deck franchise, Mads is seemingly still working in the yachting industry . During Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 4, she joined the crew as a stew with minimal experience. Mads grew up close to the water and had worked in parallel industries to yachting before she became a stew herself. Her Instagram hints that she’s continued working in roles that keep her by the ocean. Mads posted a video on a yacht in Croatia while tagging @theyachtweek in the caption while enjoying time with her friends.

Mads Loves To Travel

Mads’ instagram documents memories from her adventures.

The Below Deck Sailing Yacht stew enjoys traveling.

Since her season wrapped, the South Florida native has traveled around the world.

On her Instagram, Mads shares content from her adventures in various locations. In one post, the yachtie smiled for the camera in a stewardess outfit while yachting along the coastline of France .

Mads's Journey On Below Deck Sailing Yacht

Mads found herself in a boatmance.

Mads’ brought new energy to the cast of Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 4. She had two years of experience working in yachting before previously working on boat deliveries and day charters. She had to put her skills to the test as Daisy’s third stew on the yachting series. Mads learned a lot throughout the season, though her time on the show was overshadowed by her boatmance with Gary. She started casually hooking up with the Bosun and didn’t have any expectations for their relationship. Things got complicated when Gary and Daisy revealed they previously hooked up.

“I sensed that they slept together, but if I knew to the extent of the drama and stuff that was involved in whatever throuple relationship they have, I don’t want to be involved in that.”

Before Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 4, the Bosun and Chief Stew admitted they had been intimate. Daisy decided to tell engineer Colin MacRae, whom she developed feelings for. Mads eventually found out about their past and wasn’t upset about the news. While she stayed out of most drama, Daisy, Colin, and Gary had a complicated love triangle for the rest of Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 4. After the season, she told Andy Cohen on Watch What Happens Live that she wishes she would’ve known, so she could’ve explored her connection with deckhand Alex Propson.

Will Mads Ever Return To Below Deck Sailing Yacht?

Mads should return for Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 5. The stew hasn’t clarified if she’d be open to returning to the franchise, but she’d likely accept the offer. The Below Deck audience had a positive reception to Mads in her debut season. She brought fresh energy to the show and enjoyed having a good time. Despite not having extended yachting experience, Mads grew in her role as a stew throughout the charter season. She was involved in drama throughout the season in her boatmance with Gary, though she didn’t overthink their situation.

Nowadays, Mads is enjoying her life post- Below Deck . She continued traveling and staying close to the water. While it’s unclear if she’ll return for Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 5, the franchise would be silly not to ask her back for another season.

Below Deck Sailing Yacht seasons 1-4 are available to stream on Peacock.

Sources: Mads Herrera /Instagram, Mads Herrera /Instagram, Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Below Deck Sailing Yacht

*Availability in US

Not available

Below Deck Sailing Yacht is a spin-off of the Below Deck reality television series. Premiering on Bravo, the show follows the life of a Yacht crew as they attempt to navigate a busy Charter season in which many customers make use of a 177-foot sailing yacht. Over the first three seasons, the yacht has been to Greece, Croatia, and Spain.

Below Deck Sailing Yacht (2020)

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A ship found far off Israel’s coast could shed light on the navigation skills of ancient mariners

A company drilling for natural gas off the coast of northern Israel discovered a 3,300-year-old ship and its cargo, one of the oldest known examples of a ship sailing far from land, the Israel Antiquities Authority said Thursday.

Image

This photo released by Israel’s Antiques Authority (IAA) on Thursday, June 20, 2024 shows Jacob Sharvit, left, and Dr. Karnit Bahartan, right, with the ancient jars that were carried on the world’s oldest known deep-sea ship, as seen some 55.9 miles (90 kilometers off of the Israeli coastline. A company drilling for natural gas off the coast of northern Israel discovered a 3,300-year-old ship and its cargo, one of the oldest known examples of a ship sailing far from land, the Israel Antiquities Authority said on Thursday. (Emil Aladjem/ Israel Antiquities Authority via AP)

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This photo made from video released by Israel’s Antiquities Authority (IAA) on Thursday, June 20, 2024 shows cargo that was carried on the world’s oldest known deep-sea ship, as seen some 55.9 miles (90 kilometers off of the Israeli coastline. A company drilling for natural gas off the coast of northern Israel discovered a 3,300-year-old ship and its cargo, one of the oldest known examples of a ship sailing far from land, the Israel Antiquities Authority said on Thursday. (Energean/ Israel Antiques Authority via AP)

This photo released by Israel’s Antiquities Authority (IAA) on Thursday, June 20, 2024 shows the control room of the Energean Star ship that mounted an operation to retrieve cargo that was carried on the world’s oldest known deep-sea ship, as seen some 55.9 miles (90 kilometers off of the Israeli coastline. A company drilling for natural gas off the coast of northern Israel discovered a 3,300-year-old ship and its cargo, one of the oldest known examples of a ship sailing far from land, the Israel Antiquities Authority said on Thursday. (Emil Aladjem/ Israel Antiquities Authority via AP)

This photo made from video released by Israel’s Antiquities Authority (IAA) on Thursday, June 20, 2024 shows a Canaanite jar being retrieved by a robot from a depth of 1.11 miles (1.8 kilometers) that was carried on the world’s oldest known deep-sea ship, as seen some 55.9 miles (90 kilometers off of the Israeli coastline.. A company drilling for natural gas off the coast of northern Israel discovered a 3,300-year-old ship and its cargo, one of the oldest known examples of a ship sailing far from land, the Israel Antiquities Authority said on Thursday. (Energean/ Israel Antiquities Authority via AP)

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — A company drilling for natural gas off the coast of northern Israel discovered a 3,300-year-old ship and its cargo, one of the oldest known examples of a ship sailing far from land, the Israel Antiquities Authority said Thursday.

The discovery of the late Bronze Age ship so far out at sea indicates that the navigation abilities of ancient seafarers were more advanced than previously thought because they could travel without a line of sight to land, the IAA said.

The great depth at which the ship was found means it has been left undisturbed by waves, currents or fishermen over the millennia, offering greater potential for research, it said.

“The discovery of this boat now changes our entire understanding of ancient mariner abilities. It is the very first to be found at such a great distance with no line of sight to any landmass,” said Jacob Sharvit, head of the IAA marine unit, adding that two similar ships from the same era had been discovered previously, but only close to shore.

Sharvit said the assumption by researchers until now has been that trade during that era was conducted by boats sailing close to the shore, keeping an eye on land while moving from port to port. He said the newly discovered boat’s sailors probably used the sun and the stars to find their way.

Image

The wooden ship sank about 90 kilometers (55 miles) off Israel’s Mediterranean coast and was discovered at a depth of 1,800 meters (1.1 miles) by Energean, a natural gas company which operates a number of deep-sea natural gas fields in Israel’s territorial waters.

In its work, Energean said it uses a submersible robot to scour the sea floor. About a year ago, it came across the 12 to 14 meter (39 to 45 foot) -long ship buried under the muddy bottom, nestled under hundreds of jugs that were thousands of years old.

The boat and its cargo were fully intact, the IAA said, adding that the vessel appeared to have sunk either in a storm or after coming under attack by pirates.

The ship for now is not being retrieved.

Energean worked with the IAA to retrieve two of the jugs, which were likely used for carrying oil, wine or fruit, and bring them to the surface for research.

The IAA identified the jugs as Canaanite, a people who resided in the lands abutting the eastern Mediterranean.

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  6. Sailing the SCAMP Sailboat Argo

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VIDEO

  1. Scamp 12 sailboat sails to waterfall

  2. Sailing the Exumas with a salty crew

  3. Scamp 12 sailboat at Lucky Peak Reservoir Idaho

  4. Building a SCAMP part 094

  5. rollover

  6. Scamp sailboat Lil' Scamper with JC and Howard Rice!

COMMENTS

  1. 12' Scamp

    The Scamp is a seaworthy 12′ sailboat that can handle a good dose of adventure. Just under 12 feet in length, Scamp boasts an unusual combination of features that give her the unique ability to explore waters too shallow for a larger boat, while retaining most of the bigger boat's comforts and capabilities. An offset centerboard opens up ...

  2. SCAMP (boat)

    The SCAMP (acronym of Small Craft Advisor Magazine Project) is a wooden or fiberglass hulled Balanced Lug rigged sailing dinghy. The boat is 11 ft 11 in (3.63 m) long, and capable of accommodating four persons on a daysail or one to two for overnighting or extended cruising. Craig Wagner and Josh Colvin, editors of Small Craft Advisor Magazine ...

  3. Boat Designs: Evaluating SCAMP'S Big Sister

    The rest is history: More building plans and kits for SCAMP have been sold over the years than any other small cruising boat we can think of. Besides the original wooden version, Gig Harbor Boat Works was licensed in 2013 to produce a fiberglass SCAMP, and the little giant killer—in wood and fiberglass—has since its debut been at the center of various small-boat rallies, workshops and ...

  4. Ep. 6

    A Welsford SCAMP travels more than 70NM in three days to become quite possibly the smallest boat to circumnavigate Bruny Island, Tasmania.All the music is by...

  5. SCAMP

    S CAMP is rigged with a single balanced lugsail, an excellent choice for a cruising rig that's simple to handle and easy to reef. With 100 sq ft of sail and the stability to stand up to it, the boat also performs well. On my second sail in a SCAMP, working to windward on a gusty day, I was able to keep ahead of a 21′ Sea Pearl for several miles. . SCAMP's shallow draft and flat bottom ...

  6. Homebuilt SCAMP Micro Cruiser Sailboat Tour (E.87 Sailing w/the

    Spencer gives everyone a run down of the SCAMP him and his buddy, Walter built. 🥬Become a Paid Subscriber and Help Us Out:https://www.thelitzenbergers.com/h...

  7. The Biggest Little Boat

    The Scamp is a seaworthy 12' sailboat that can handle a good dose of adventure. Just under 12 feet in length, Scamp boasts an unusual combination of features...

  8. SCAMP Review in Small Craft Advisor Magazine!

    Exciting news that's been a long time coming . . . the Small Craft Advisor magazine released their first formal review of the SCAMP! For a bit of backstory, the SCAMP, which stands for Small Craft Advisor Magazine Project, was originally conceived by the magazine as a kit boat that would meet the needs of adventurous small craft sailors.It was designed by a team of passionate and ...

  9. Close to the Water: My Boat Crush

    A group camp-cruising trip on the Lower Columbia River near Cathlamet, WA. I initially expected the Scamp to sail like a bulldozer, slogging along pushing water. In reality, it moves smoothly under sail and turns on a dime, making sailing out of a marina or around other tight places deceptively easy.

  10. 12' SCAMP Microcruiser: The Biggest Little Boat

    48° North Sailing Magazine called our fiberglass Scamp "The biggest little boat I've ever sailed..." here's a little video that shows why! The Scamp is...

  11. Fiberglass SCAMP review in 48 North

    Our fiberglass SCAMP got a fantastic write-up in the April 2014 issue of 48 North! It's a pretty good sized article so we're not going to reprint the whole thing here, but these are a few of our favorite parts: Gig Harbor Boat Works, known for their strong, esthetically pleasing rowing boats, has already shipped a number of the new SCAMPS ...

  12. SCAMP Dinghy Sailing on Vimeo

    SCAMP Dinghy Sailing on Vimeo. This video is about Team Noddy's Noggins R2AK 2015 Stage-1 crossing to Victoria British Columbia, across 40 mile of open water in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. This was part of the Race to Alaska, and started in Port Townsend Washington. Team Noddy finished 40th out of 53 vessels at the starting line.

  13. S.C.A.M.P. Printed Plans

    SCAMP features an offset centerboard, massive flotation from sealed seats and stowage cabin, a water ballast tank holding 173 pounds of water, an after cabin "veranda" that functions like a hard dodger, and a flat bottom and skegs for beaching. PLANS: Complete plans now available on 7 24 x 36" sheets. A complete "Building guide" with suggested ...

  14. Multiple sailing dinghy

    The Scamp is a seaworthy 12′ sailboat that can handle a good dose of adventure. Just under 12 feet in length, Scamp boasts an unusual combination of features that give her the unique ability to explore waters too shallow for a larger boat, while retaining most of the bigger boat's comforts and capabilities. An offset centerboard opens up ...

  15. Kits and Packages

    Cruising Sailboats; Motor Boats; Sail and Oar Boats; Tenders and Rowing Boats ; Trailerable Cabin Sailboats; Jim Michalak . All Jim Michalak ... Deck Cleats 6 SD-041606 6" stainless deck cleats for docklines Pintles and Gudgeons1 set RL490-SCAMP Heavy-duty Scamp-specific pintles and gudgeons Hatches*There are lots of ways to hatch Scamp—this ...

  16. SCAMP

    The Team. Scamp Sailing Team is a group of highly talented professional and semi-professional sailors based in Poland. During the 2019 season the team entered the European ORC Championship held in Oxelosund, Sweden, competing against some of the Europe's best sailors. We returned home with 3rd place overall in the highest ranked group A.

  17. Russian River Cruises aboard the Volga Dream

    Moscow and St. Petersburg are Russia's best-known cities, but the towns of Russia's historic Golden Ring are delightful too. The luxurious Volga Dream offers a unique opportunity to visit these Russian gems by sailing gently along the Volga River on an unforgettable cruising experience.

  18. Russian River Cruise

    The Waterways of the Tsars cruise is 13 days long, starting either in Moscow or in St. Petersburg. Most Russian river cruises had always been described to me as 'Volga Cruises' - in fact, our boat cruised along a variety of waterways, including the Moscow Canal, the Volga-Baltic Waterway, the Rybinsk Reservoir, Lake Onega and Ladoga (the ...

  19. Moscow to St. Petersburg Russian River Cruise

    13 days - 12 nights. Moscow and St. Petersburg are Russia's best-known cities, but the towns of Russia's historic Golden Ring are delightful too. The luxurious Volga Dream offers a unique opportunity to visit these Russian gems by sailing gently along the Volga River on an unforgettable cruising experience.

  20. Sailing Micro Cruiser SCAMP Sailboat During the Alaskan ...

    We take Spencer's homebuilt SCAMP, Paper Mate, to Thumb Cove, a 9 mile sail from Seward Alaska. Oh, and we change our channel name!!! "Litzenbergers" We thin...

  21. Ahead of 2024 Olympics, Jacomo Sailing Club gives a look inside the

    The Jacomo Sailing Club calls Lake Jacomo in Eastern Jackson County home and has since the lake's creation in 1958. The club has around 125 members. Erin Doughty is the Community Relations Chair ...

  22. Moscow St. Petersburg Cruise

    8 days and 7 nights. Enjoy a short Russian river cruise on a comfortable 4-star ship. Our program includes all the most important sights on the Moscow to St. Petersburg route. Besides the Two Capitals, you will visit the ancient towns of Uglich, Goritsy, the island of Kizhi, and Mandrogui village. $ 811 From/Per person.

  23. Sailing the Mediterranean on a 136-Passenger Windjammer

    Summer prices, which include food and beverages, range from $3,995 for a four-night sailing in a superior cabin to $9,420 for a veranda suite. Seven-night sailings cost between $6,995 and $16,495.

  24. An Island-to-Island Yacht Cruise in Croatia

    A 30-percent-off Black Friday sale on a cruise aboard a yacht meant off-season sailing and being prepared for the unexpected. By Elaine Glusac Elaine Glusac is the Frugal Traveler columnist ...

  25. Lindsey Vonn goes sailing with Team USA and joins grinder Anna Weis on

    Lindsey Vonn went sailing on the Hudson River on Friday aboard a foiling catamaran, enjoying one of the perks of joining the board of directors of the United States SailGP team. The retired skiing champion was the "sixth sailor" with Team USA for a jaunt off Manhattan before all 10 crews held practice races ahead of this weekend's ...

  26. I Don't Think Below Deck Sailing Yacht Is Returning (Or At Least Not

    Below Deck Sailing Yacht has been one of the most highly anticipated returning shows on Bravo, but I don't think the series is coming back - at least not anytime too soon.After Below Deck Sailing Yacht season 4 served some incredible drama, viewers have been impatiently waiting for the series to return. Throughout the Below Deck franchise, spin-offs can be hit or miss, so when Below Deck ...

  27. Scamp Sail

    SCAMP sailing off Point Hudson 1-8-2012. Temperature 44º, winds 12-14 knots with occasional gusts to 17. Two-reefed with a sloppy jiffy reef on new sail. Top...

  28. What Happened To Mads Herrera After Below Deck Sailing Yacht Season 4?

    Mads Herrera has continued seeking adventure after Below Deck Sailing Yacht.The Below Deck spin-off premiered in 2020, offering a fresh extension to the show's classic format.Below Deck Sailing Yacht follows the crew and its captain, Glenn Shephard. With four seasons under its belt, the series has introduced many franchise yachties throughout its tenure.

  29. 25th edition of Sailing Corso Westland attracts hundreds of thousands

    The three-day boat parade ends on Sunday around 7:30 p.m. in the home port in Honselersdijk. On Friday, the number of visitors was somewhat disappointing due to the bad weather, the spokesperson said. About 50,000 to 75,000 people admired the sailing parade from the shore. The following two days the boats attracted more attention, around ...

  30. A ship found far off Israel's coast could shed light on the navigation

    This photo released by Israel's Antiques Authority (IAA) on Thursday, June 20, 2024 shows Jacob Sharvit, left, and Dr. Karnit Bahartan, right, with the ancient jars that were carried on the world's oldest known deep-sea ship, as seen some 55.9 miles (90 kilometers off of the Israeli coastline.