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The 6 Best Yacht Clubs in Toronto [2022]

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Best Yacht Clubs in Toronto

These Toronto yacht clubs are known as the best in the city and they live up to their reputation! By joining a yacht club, you gain access to other perks like dining rooms and boats other than your own. These clubs can teach you how to boat or for the more experienced, let you participate in yacht sailing competitions.

We selected these Toronto yacht clubs based on customer reviews, location, the events they host, and their high-class boating and racing programs! 

Before you join any of these premier yacht clubs, you need to buy a boat first! Head over to the best boat dealers near Toronto.

If you already have a boat, it’s very important to keep it in tip-top shape. If it’s in need of a fix, take it to the best boat repairs in the city!

  • What’s the Average Cost of Joining a Yacht Club in Toronto?
  • 1) National Yacht Club
  • 2) RCYC – Royal Canadian Yacht Club
  • 3) Etobicoke Yacht Club
  • 4) Ashbridges Bay Yacht Club
  • 5) Lakeshore Yacht Club
  • 6) Cathedral Bluffs Yacht Club

FAQs About Yacht Clubs

Final thoughts, what's the average cost of joining a yacht club in toronto.

The average cost of joining a yacht club in Toronto is about $3,000. This does not include the cost of membership dues, which can be an additional $1,200 – $2500 per year.  Some other factors, such as the location of the club and the type of boat you have, can also affect the cost of membership.

For what you’re paying, you’ll have access to the club’s facilities and staff, as well as other members who share your passion for boating. You’ll also be able to take part in club-sponsored activities, like racing and cruising events.

If you’re looking for a more luxurious yacht club experience, you can expect to pay upwards of $10,000 for membership. These clubs offer higher-end amenities and services, like valet parking and concierge service. They also tend to be located in prime real estate, like downtown Toronto or along the city’s waterfront.

The Best Yacht Clubs in Toronto

1. national yacht club.

royal canadian yacht club toronto

The National Yacht Club is a boating community that has been around since 1890, and it’s right by the foot of Bathurst Street. It is the perfect destination for you and your crew to take advantage of their beautiful surroundings while taking a break from working hard. They have plenty going on, whether it be social events or just relaxation! 

Their location is equally convenient to the lake with quick access to the inner harbour, Toronto Islands and Lake Ontario – you are on the lake in minutes, and back in the city at the end of the race or cruise just as quickly. 

The National Yacht Club is a great place to find like-minded sailors. With three nights of club racing, organized cruises and power boat enthusiasts that are passionate about their vessels – you’ll be sure not to leave without newfound friends! 

As an NYC member, you’ll have access to their Racing Crew Bank and Weeknight Cruising Program as well as a unique dinghy racing 420 Club. You can also sign up for Boat4U boat share where they provide the vessel!

Fantastic city-side location with a fabulous dining room, best docks, comprehensive learn to sail, cruising and racing programs – you won’t find anything like it anywhere else!

Business Information:

Website: thenyc.com Email: [email protected] Telephone: +14162608686 Address: 1 Stadium Rd, Toronto, ON M5V 3H4, Canada

Customer Review Highlight:

  • Photography services are included in some packages
  • Professional settings for business meetings
  • Offers services in Toronto and Miami
  • Catering options were slightly vague

2. RCYC - Royal Canadian Yacht Club, Island Clubhouse

royal canadian yacht club toronto

If you’re looking for a private club with unparalleled views of the city, RCYC is your best option. The Royal Canadian Yacht Club is a prestigious club that was established in 1852. In those years, they have built an excellent reputation as sponsors and builders for yacht racing teams across Canada! 

With two Toronto-area locations and boats available from every member in good standing there’s no better place to host an event. They are a community of like-minded individuals who share an interest in yachting, sport and tradition. 

They welcome new members with open arms to their welcoming yacht club! RCYC’s mandate is to promote excellence in all forms of competitive sailing and sports like squash, badminton, tennis and lawn bowling. 

RCYC has a long tradition of competitive excellence in yacht racing. Each year, they host many regattas – provincial, national and international ones! Midweek Racing is held throughout the spring, summer and fall.

 From Club Fleet Championships to International Events, their Toronto Island clubhouse is the place for people who love sailboat racing. RCYC offers a variety of sailing programs for all ages and levels.

 Whether you are just beginning your journey or looking to take it up another notch, there’s something here that will suit every boat!

Website: rcyc.ca Email: [email protected] Telephone: +14169677245 Address: 2 Chippewa Ave, Toronto, ON M5J 2E7, Canada

  • Has an app for secure communication and transactions
  • Swift response and easy to book
  • Offers services in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal
  • Offers boat lessons sailing, fishing and watersports
  • Some options are unavailable

3. Etobicoke Yacht Club

royal canadian yacht club toronto

As you approach the Etobicoke Yacht Club, it is hard to imagine that this location could be any more ideal. With its picturesque views and spacious waters in Humber Bay as well as easy access points near shorelines on western Lake Ontario – you’ll definitely be impressed with what you’ll see! 

Whether it’s rowing a boat around sunset over the water while listening to birds sing; or enjoying live music under the stars every night – they’ve got something perfect just waiting here. They offer a variety of memberships and programs for all ages. 

Whether you’re an experienced sailor or just getting started, their members have something for everyone. They offer competitive racing fleets and vibrant social scenes that will keep your adrenaline pumping all summer long! 

They’re always happy to see their friends from other yacht clubs during the season. The welcoming, social community of sailors with a healthy racing and junior sail program is what you’ll find at the Yacht Club. 

Memberships range from social, crewing, and boating in a very social club, where members work together on events and activities making it a community of like-minded individuals that enjoy the wind!

Website: www.eyc.ca Email: [email protected] Telephone: +14162591159 Address: 300 Humber Bay Park Rd W, Etobicoke, ON M8V 3X7, Canada

  • Offers night sails
  • 4 membership options with 4 different luxury yachts
  • Club options with no commitment for budding sailors
  • Does not allow pets onboard
  • Guest exceeding 125kilos/275 pounds are rejected without refund
  • Smoking is not allowed

4. Ashbridges Bay Yacht Club

royal canadian yacht club toronto

The founding members of the Ashbridge’s Bay Yacht Club had one goal in mind: To promote good yachtmanship, tradition and volunteerism. The principles they promoted have remained true today, over 80 years since its inception.

The ABYC is a great place for those who love boat racing. They offer weekly club races from May through September, and these always have exciting finals! 

Their weekend cruises provide an opportunity for socializing and making new friends around the lake. This is one area of boating which attracts power boats as well sail-driven vessels! 

ABYC has always been dedicated to ensuring the safety and satisfaction of its members, which is why they’re such a popular club among visitors. The club has a friendly and courteous staff that makes you feel at home. 

The members are also great people who make the environment enjoyable for everyone to enjoy!

Website: abyc.ca Email: [email protected] Telephone: +14166984498 Address: 30 Ashbridges Bay Park Rd, Toronto, ON M4L 3W6, Canada

  • Swift service
  • Slight to no delay for long lines
  • Children under 2 years ride for free
  • Longer hours during weekends
  • Requires $30 minimum for the boat to depart

5. Lakeshore Yacht Club

royal canadian yacht club toronto

Lakeshore Yacht Club believes that safe and fun boating is an essential part of the countless memories you’ll make together. At their facility, they are dedicated to providing a safe and fun environment for all of the members who visit. 

They take great pride in maintaining an environmentally sound structure that will provide you with many years worth of memories! By choosing them, you can feel confident that your boat will be in tip-top shape and comply with all standards of safety. 

Lakeshore Yacht Club is a great place to meet new people and learn about the surrounding area. The boats are tiny, but also well-designed and convenient with everything in pristine condition! 

Plus the environment is such a clean, friendly space that you can’t help feeling happy when visiting this place for experienced pleasures!

Website: lsyc.com Email: [email protected] Telephone: +14162553701 Address: 76 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Dr, Etobicoke, ON M8V 4B7, Canada

6. Cathedral Bluffs Yacht Club

royal canadian yacht club toronto

Nestled at the base of beautiful Scarborough Bluffs, Cathedral Bluffs Yacht Club has its own paradise island that is easily accessible from across the region. You’ll soon forget all about city life as you relax on your boat amidst fabulous scenery!

The beautiful surroundings and great facilities make them an attractive destination for club members looking to book their own cruise vacation! With events throughout summer including cruising & racing along with wintertime activities like fishing trips in between races – they have it all! 

They’re a unique organization, with member-built and maintained facilities. They offer the full suite of services at reasonable rates that you can afford, so whether you’re looking for a place to socialize or enjoy the scenic views of Lake Ontario, they have something that will suit your needs!

Website: cbyc.ca Email: [email protected] Telephone: +14162617627 Address: Brimley Rd S, Scarborough, ON M1M 3W3, Canada

  • Very large capacity with upto 500 people
  • Catering provided by a world class chef
  • Large variety of alcohol and spirits are available
  • In-house DJ with music amenities
  • Website is very vague
  • Can get stuffy at large events

The best yacht clubs in Toronto are open for membership! They have world-class facilities and excellent programs for racing and cruising boats.  Yacht clubs are also a great way to meet new people. The members of these Toronto clubs are as enthusiastic about yachting as you are. If you’re looking for a yacht club to join, become a member of any of the best yacht clubs in Toronto!

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The Royal Canadian Yacht Club, a pride of Toronto

royal canadian yacht club toronto

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Water sports have been popular in Toronto since the late 19th century. Thus, the RCYC (Royal Canadian Yacht Club) was established in the city. Its founders aimed at popularisation of the water sports on motor boats and organised public races. The RCYC was developing quite quickly and gathered people from all over the world. Learn more at itoronto.info .  

  • Foundation of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club

royal canadian yacht club toronto

In 1850, locals gathered at a meeting and laid the foundation of the Toronto Boat Club. The official opening of the club took place in 1852. In 1853, it was named the Toronto Yacht Club. Then the club applied for a Royal Warrant. To their great surprise, Queen Victoria granted that yacht club the status of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. 

Back then, yacht clubs often participated in various defence operations together with the Royal Navy. In 1862, the Royal Canadian Yacht Club (RCYC) established an armed marine company that conducted training three times a week. 

The first building that housed the club was the one owned by Casimir Gzowski, not far from the present location of Union Station. Later, the club moved to another location. In 1853, the yacht club was housed in a one-story building that was built on top of a schooner moored near Simcoe St. 

In 1858, the RCYC built a clubhouse at its own expense near the Parliament Buildings on Front Street. But after the industrialization of the harbour and increased ship traffic, the club members decided to move to the Toronto Islands. 

In 1881, a clubhouse was built on the North Island and remains there till nowadays. It was designed by architects Darling and Curry. 

In order to transport all club members to the island, the RCYC purchased the steamboat Esperanza, which was given permission to moor at the wharf at the foot of York Street. 

  • What did the members of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club do?

royal canadian yacht club toronto

The main activity of the club was sailing races. The first RCYC competition was held in 1858 and the prize fund was $600. In 1876, the RCYC participated in the America’s Cup. 

In 1896, the Lincoln Park Boat Club challenged the RCYC and ran a series of match races. Several other cities participated in the race too. The RCYC won and got the monetary prize as well as the Canada’s Cup. By the way, since then, the Canada’s Cup has been the most prestigious Great Lakes’ trophy. 

The Royal Canadian Yacht Club during the First and Second World Wars 

royal canadian yacht club toronto

The First World War began in 1914 and most of the club members were conscripted into the army. 59 of them died on the battlefield. To commemorate them, in 1926, the club installed a large granite and marble memorial in the form of a ship’s mast in front of the yacht club building. 

At the end of the First World War, the club rebuilt its fleet, purchasing 4 P-class boats and several C-type 25-foot boats. They were used in club races. 

During the war years (1939 – 1945), the club was closed. With the advent of peace, it started to operate again. In 1946, the number of club members rapidly increased, so the club required expansion. Thus, the founders decided to lease the entire South Island. 

Having survived two wars and a crisis, the RCYC continues to work. 

The modern Royal Canadian Yacht Club has many objectives: 

  • Encouragement of club members to improve 
  • Promotion of yacht architecture development and construction of new vessels
  • Promotion of sailing development. 

The RCYC is considered the oldest and largest yacht club in the world. Its summer residence is located on three islands, namely RCYC Island, South Island and North Chippewa or Snug Island. The winter residence is located at 141 St. George Street. The building can house sports and social events.

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The Royal Canadian Yacht Club is a Toronto-based venue that specializes in hosting a number of weddings and special events. Founded in 1852, the RCYC is one of Canada's premiere sailing and social clubs, makes it a unique venue to celebrate your special day. A distinct nautical theme is appropriately placed in each room coupled with unique island views. A marine-inspired wedding is possible at RCYC.

Facilities and Capacity

The RCYC can create a unique setting with spectacular views of the city skyline, an outdoor space for ceremonies and receptions and exceptional food and service. Their bright and spacious function rooms can accommodate groups up to 250 people.

Each room is tastefully decorated, many with nautical themes and working fireplace. In addition to their historic clubhouse, they offer a secluded rose garden, ideally suited for wedding ceremonies.

Services Offered

The details of the RCYC wedding package services include:

  • A selection of passed hors d’oeuvres (3 pieces per person)
  • Host bar including premium brand liquors (4 hours)
  • House wines (2 glasses per person with dinner)
  • Late night coffee & tea station
  • White floor length linens and napkins
  • Votive candles
  • Podium and microphone
  • Bridal change room
  • Complimentary menu tasting for two

Perhaps the one item that surpasses the beauty of the surroundings, is the quality of the food that is offered. Choose from one of their tasteful menus or feel free to arrange a custom designed meal for your event. Whatever your selection, you can be assured of the finest attention to the ingredients and preparation.

Service for your event will be attentive, yet unobtrusive. Their banquet maître d' will be on-site for the entire duration of your function, ensuring that any last minute requests are promptly attended to.

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Royal Canadian Yacht Club

royal canadian yacht club toronto

Royal Canadian Yacht Club

The foundation stone for the current island clubhouse was laid in 1919 by Prince Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII) Royal Canadian Yacht Club.JPG

The Royal Canadian Yacht Club ( RCYC ) is a private yacht club in Toronto , Ontario , Canada. [1] Founded in 1852, it is one of the world's older and larger yacht clubs. [3] Its summer home is on a trio of islands (RCYC Island, South Island and North Chippewa or Snug Island) in the Toronto Islands . Its winter home since 1984 has been a purpose-built clubhouse located at 141 St. George Street in Toronto (just north of Bloor Street ), which includes facilities for sports and social activities. In 2014, the club had approximately 4700 members, about 450 yachts (95% sail) and a number of dinghies, principally International 14s .

From founding to 1896

1896 to 1969, 1967 to present, olympic sailors, model collection, notable members, bibliography, external links.

The objects of the club are:

  • to encourage members to become proficient in the personal management, maintenance, control and handling of their yachts, in navigation, and in all matters pertaining to seamanship;
  • to promote yacht architecture, building and sailing in Canadian waters;
  • to promote excellence in competitive sailing; and
  • to promote such other sports and social activities as may be desirable in the interest of members generally.

At an informal meeting in 1850, eight local citizens laid the foundation for the Toronto Boat Club. The club was formally established in 1852. [4]

In 1853, the club revised its name to the Toronto Yacht Club. On the advice of its patron, Lord Elgin, the club changed its name to the Canadian Yacht Club later in 1853. That same year, the club petitioned the Crown for a Royal warrant. The petition was granted by Queen Victoria , [5] and the club became known as the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Although there is conflicting evidence about the reason behind the change in name from Toronto Yacht Club to Canadian Yacht Club, the most credible explanation is that the club wished to signify its regional rather than merely local significance. Since the City of Toronto was then located in the Canada West area of the Province of Canada , "Toronto" gave way to "Canadian" in the club's name. [6]

The first clubhouse was established in a building owned by Sir Casimir Gzowski , near the present site of Union Station . After a short tenancy, the club moved to a one-storey building erected on a scow moored just east of Simcoe Street. This served from 1853 until 1858, when it was replaced by the steamer Provincial . The Provincial provided shelter until the end of 1868, when it escaped its mooring, drifted away with the winter ice and was blown up as a hazard to navigation.

In 1869, the club built a clubhouse adjacent to the Parliament Buildings on Front Street. In 1881, a clubhouse by architect Frank Darling of Darling & Curry was completed on the Toronto Islands at the site of the present clubhouse, since “the increasing number of railway tracks had completely changed the character of the Esplanade … originally … flanked by handsome residences and the bright blue waters of the Bay.” [7] [8] [9] To reach the new location, the club purchased the clipper-bowed steam launch Esperanza and secured landing rights at the foot of Yonge Street , which it held until 1953 (evolution of the waterfront led to further moves — to York Street until 1979, then to Parliament Street until 2011, when the present launch station was established on Cherry Street). The 1881 building burned in 1904; at that time, buildings, predominantly built of wood, were heated by coal stoves and lit by lanterns and gas lighting, thus fires were frequent and the building standard was founded on an expected average life of 20 years. [10]

While club buildings were rising up and burning down, the members were engaged in racing. The club challenged for the America’s Cup in 1876, and while the Countess of Dufferin was unsuccessful on the water, her owner was more successful at the negotiating table, and weaned the New York Yacht Club from its habit of requiring the challenger to race against its entire fleet.

In 1878, the club’s yachts were granted the privilege of wearing the Blue Ensign , defaced with a crown in the fly. This endured, with a break for both the First and Second World Wars, until the advent of the new maple leaf flag of Canada in 1965.

As the club’s yachts grew increasingly sophisticated, members’ tastes in designs diverged. Early examples hewed closely to the extreme British plank-on-edge style that relied on ballast, not hull-form, for stability. As the century wore on, Canadian designers such as Alexander Cuthbert and A. Cary Smith began to incorporate more of the features of American yachts, such as form-based stability and centreboards. Members were also looking back to Britain for well-rounded designs from such notables as George Lennox Watson and William Fife .

In 1896, Lincoln Park Yacht Club of Chicago challenged the RCYC to a series of match races. Interest was such that several cities vied for the contest – Toledo, Ohio won with the offer of a large cash prize and a splendid trophy by Tiffany & Co. The RCYC yacht Canada , designed by William Fife and sailed under Æmilius Jarvis , defeated Vencedor and won the cash and cup. The Canada owners’ syndicate then donated the cup to the club for perpetual cross-border competition, and the Canada's Cup has since then been "the Great Lakes’ most prestigious trophy" and an emblem of the club's commitment to yacht racing. [11]

The 1881 clubhouse burned in 1904. A new building by Henry Sproatt was completed in 1906 but burned in 1918. The remains served until completion of the present building to a slightly modified version of Sproatt’s design in 1922. [12]

By 1900, yacht design had progressed to the point that a new measurement rule was required. A lakes-specific rule and scantlings were published, but never built to. Eventually, Æmilius Jarvis in 1910 built the very successful Swamba , an R-class by George Owen that was the first vessel built to the new Universal Rule on Lake Ontario. [13] She was followed by Patricia , a P-Boat also designed to the new Rule by Owen. [14] [15]

Like most yacht clubs in Britain and the Empire, the club was conceived as an auxiliary to the Royal Navy (hence the naval titles and uniforms), a source of political support and if the need arose, of men familiar with boats. In the days when the Royal Navy fought under sail and yachting was a new idea, “in the building and racing of fast pleasure craft, the Navy… received the benefit of experience and experiment… not possible… under service conditions”. [16] When the First World War came in 1914, the services were short of lead for weapons, and many members patriotically dismantled their boats and gave their keels to be melted. Canada disappeared at this time.

As elsewhere, there was a rush to enlist; at the peak, over 450 members were in the services. 59 of the club’s members died in service. In commemoration, the club in 1926 installed a large granite, marble and bronze memorial, designed by Charles J. Gibson in the form of a ship’s capstan on a low podium on the front lawn, to honour those who had not returned. [17] (The names of the 23 who did not return from the Second World War were added in 1952.) [18]

The club rebuilt its fleet at the First World War’s end, first with the purchase of four P-Boats in 1919, which were then sold to members, then the acquisition of a number of one-design 25-footers known as the C-Boats. These one-design sloops, designed by TBF Benson, fostered close club and inter-club racing, raising everyone’s skill and pleasure. [19] The Universal Rule’s leaning toward large and costly boats, though, called out for a new approach. The first club boat to the new International Rule was the 6-Metre Merenneito . [20] The new Rule so impressed members that three 8-Metres were built to challenge for the Canada’s Cup: Vision ( Camper & Nicholsons ); Quest (William Fife); and Norseman ( William Roué ). A fourth Eight, Invader II was built but was no more successful. [21] Star boats joined the fleet in 1935. At about that time, the 14-footer fleet, precursor to the International 14 , formed.

The club was quiet through the war years 1939 to 1945, but rebounded with peace (and generous fee rebates to those who had served). Expanding membership required expansion of the leasehold over the whole of South Island. In 1954, Venture II reclaimed the Canada’s Cup, ending 51 years at the Rochester Yacht Club. [22] The same year, Hurricane Hazel badly damaged the Toronto waterfront; yachts were then moved from moorings in the harbour to docks in the lagoons between the islands.

The second objective of the club is to “promote yacht architecture, building and sailing…” In the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, the club’s greatest contribution was through the continuing development of the Fourteen class by TBF Benson, Charlie Bourke, and Fred Buller , making a significant contribution to the present International 14. Buller, who was head of aeronautical design at de Havilland Canada deserves special mention, having realized that the tell-tales used to analyze airflow over aircraft could be used to advantage on sails. Buller is credited with originating and popularizing their use, initially in the 14 class, but the idea spread rapidly. [23]

In 1967, Perry Connolly , a club member asked another member, George Cuthbertson , and his partner, George Cassian , to design "the meanest, hungriest 40-footer afloat." Fibreglass was displacing wood as the material of choice by that time, but hulls and decks were solid glass, thus heavy. The new boat, Red Jacket , was designed and built with a hull and deck cored with balsa, a first in North America; light weight combined with a fin keel and all-movable rudder made her faster and handier than her contemporaries. [24] In her first year on the lake, the new boat took 11 of 13 events entered. In her second year, she took top spot at Florida’s Southern Ocean Racing Circuit. The prestige of this and other high-visibility conquests, such as Manitou ’s defence of the Canada’s Cup was a springboard for a new partnership of designers and builders under the name C&C Yachts . C&C, at one time the largest yacht builder in the world, used balsa core in all of its many models, validating cored-laminate technology that is now used in most yachts, racing or cruising. Yachting use of cored laminates arguably led to aviation’s re-discovery of the concept; after a decades-long hiatus, cored composites are now used in most aircraft. [25] Club members retained a close relationship with the company until the sale of its name to US interests.

In the late 1970s, a group of members engaged designer Mark Ellis and builder George Hinterhoeller to make six 30-foot (9.1 metres) cruising yachts that could comfortably be sailed by one person. The Nonsuch series (named for Henry Hudson ’s vessel) had the beamy looks of a traditional U.S. East Coast cat-boat, the underbody of a modern cruising yacht, much sail and the accommodations of a much larger yacht. Eventually, nearly a thousand were built, from 22 to 36 feet (6.8 to 10.9 metres).

During the first half of the 1980s, the club’s International 14 fleet championed the development of a series of designs by member Jay Cross . Powerful and readily planed, Cross designs dominated the North American 14 fleet.

Sailing wing-sail catamarans designed by former C&C Yachts designer Steve Killing, club member Fred Eaton won the International C-Class Catamaran Championship , sailed at RCYC in 2007 and at New York Yacht Club , Newport, Rhode Island, USA in 2010. [26] Early development included foiling vessels that were unsuccessful against immersed hulls in light Lake Ontario airs. Eaton's team’s development progress and the direct participation or observation by AC team members in the 2010 event significantly influenced the decision to sail the 2013 America’s Cup in wing-sail catamarans. [27]

In the summer of 2015, the club hosted sailing events for the 2015 Pan American Games .

Forty-eight RCYC members have qualified for the Olympics; one-third of Canadian Olympic qualifiers have come from the club. Members have gained medals for Canada in four events and for Norway in one event.

In summer, the club occupies three islands in the chain that forms the south side of Toronto harbour. The island clubhouse with its porticoed verandahs, Toronto’s largest wooden building, houses a ballroom, dining rooms and other social spaces. Other buildings house the sailing management offices, the junior club, lockers and workspace for the club’s mechanics, riggers, woodworkers and marine yard workers. Island activities include sailing lessons for juniors and adults, sailing in club-owned boats, tennis, swimming and lawn bowling. [28]

The island clubhouse is linked to the city by a launch service operated by two notable launches, both over a century old and built for the club. The Hiawatha [29] built in 1895 and the Kwasind built in 1912 [30] which sail from a dock on the Ship Channel of the Toronto Harbour where it meets Cherry Street. [28] [31]

With its merger with the Carlton Club in 1974, the club gained a winter home in the city (and the addition of racquet sports to its attractions). [32] Ten years later in 1984, the new city clubhouse, opened at 141 St. George St. in the Annex. It is an all-year facility, and provides dining and social spaces, squash and badminton courts, fitness and other facilities. [28]

RCYC possesses one of the finest collections of yacht models in North America, in spite of clubhouse fires in 1896, 1904 and 1918 that consumed many valuable examples. [33] The model of Minota was deliberately preserved with the marks of the 1918 fire. [34]

The collection now includes over 170 models, about half displayed in the City Clubhouse Model Room with the remainder elsewhere in the City Clubhouse or in the Island Clubhouse. The Island’s Flagship Room displays some three dozen models of past Commodores’ yachts while the Eight-Metre Room shows a dozen of the type. Fifteen Fourteen-footer and International 14 models in the City Club bar provide the most comprehensive available guide to the class’s development over a 100-year span.

  • Edward Blake - Premier of Ontario [35]
  • Edward Roper Curzon Clarkson - founding partner of accounting firm Clarkson Gordon
  • George Harding Cuthbertson - yacht builder and designer [36]
  • Sir John Craig Eaton - businessman and philanthropist [37]
  • Jim Flaherty - Finance Minister of Canada [38]
  • Sir Joseph Flavelle - Industrialist and Baronet [39]
  • George Horace Gooderham - distillery owner and politician [40]
  • Sir Casimir Gzowski - Lieutenant Governor of Ontario
  • Paul Henderson - Olympic sailor [41]
  • Edward Æmilius Jarvis - business magnate [42]
  • Allan Lamport - Mayor of Toronto [43]
  • Sir John A. Macdonald - Prime Minister of Canada
  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Godfrey Peuchen - Titanic survivor and military officer [44] [45]
  • Paul James Phelan - Chairman of Cara Foods Inc. [46]
  • James Henry Plummer - Financier - [47]
  • Venues of the 2015 Pan American and Parapan American Games
  • Snider, C. H. J., Ovens, Frank Annals of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club Volume I, 1852-1937: Volume 2, 1938-1954 ; Ovens, Frank, Cuthbertson, G., Mallion, A., Caldwell, C. ‘’Annals of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club Volume 3, 1955-2000’’ (published in a slipcased set) Royal Canadian Yacht Club, 2000
  • Snider, C. H. J., Hyland, J. A., Wade, T. K., Bourke, C. W., Kimber, H. A., Sorsoleil, E. G., Reid, G., Standing, H., Wood, S. C., 1852-1952 The Royal Canadian Yacht Club , Royal Canadian Yacht Club, 1952
  • Daniel Spurr Heart of Glass - Fiberglass Boats And The Men Who Made Them , International Marine Publishing/McGraw-Hill, 2000

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C&C Yachts was a builder of high-performance fiberglass monohull sailboats with production facilities in Canada, Germany, and the United States. C&C designed and constructed a full range of production line cruiser-racer boats, as well as custom one-off and short production run racing and cruising boats. C&C boats ranged in size from as small as 21 ft (6.4 m) to as large as 67 ft (20.4 m). C&C also produced a line of bluewater cruising boats in the 35 ft (10.7 m) to 48 ft (14.6 m) range under its Landfall brand. In addition, C&C designed sailboats for production by a number of other manufacturers such as CS Yachts, Mirage Yachts, Northern Yachts, Ontario Yachts, Paceship Yachts, and Tanzer Industries.

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The Island Yacht Club is a proprietary yacht club in Toronto, Ontario Canada. The club is located on 16 acres (6.5 ha) of land on Mugg's Island, one of the islands in the Toronto Islands. The club is accessible from April to October using the club's private boat from downtown. The club has its own marina providing docking and marine services to members. Since 2015, it has been owned by Blockhouse Bay Management Company.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">C&C 61</span> Sailboat class

The C&C 61 is a Canadian sailboat, that was designed by Cuthbertson & Cassian and first built in 1970.

The C&C 44 and the C&C 44 Custom are a series of Canadian sailboats, that were designed by Robert W. Ball and first built in 1985.

Robert Wilson Ball was a Canadian yacht designer, based in Port Credit, Ontario, and later, New Bedford, Massachusetts. Robert Ball was the chief in-house designer and Vice President of Design at C&C Yachts from 1973 to 1991.

George Harding Cuthbertson (1929-2017) was a founding partner of Cuthbertson & Cassian yacht designers, one of four companies that in 1969 formed C&C Yachts, a Canadian yacht builder that dominated North American sailing in the 1970s and early ‘80s.

George Cassian was a yacht designer and founding partner of Cuthbertson & Cassian yacht designers, one of four companies that in 1969 formed C&C Yachts, a Canadian yacht builder that dominated North American sailing in the 1970s and early 1980s. His was the second “C” in C&C, with his design associate George Cuthbertson, being the first. Cassian would continue as a designer with that company until his untimely death in 1980 at the age of 47.

Erich Bruckmann was a boat builder and founder of Bruckmann Manufacturing, one of four companies that in 1969 formed C&C Yachts, a Canadian yacht builder that dominated North American sailing in the 1970s and early 1980s.

The Mark 25 is an American trailerable sailboat that was designed by Canadian George Harding Cuthbertson, as one of the first works under his new design firm Motion Designs Limited after he left C&C Design. The boat was intended as a racer-cruiser and first built in 1984.

  • ↑ "Heritage - History of The Royal Canadian Yacht Club" . Retrieved 2014-01-04 .
  • ↑ World’s Oldest Yacht Clubs
  • ↑ "Annals of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, 1852-1937   : With a record of the Club's trophies and the contests for them" . 1937.
  • ↑ Club, Royal Canadian Yacht (1856). Laws and regulations of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club [ microform ] . ISBN   9780665918285 .
  • ↑ Annals of the RCYC , Vol. I, p. 24.
  • ↑ Frank Darling, Dictionary of Architects in Canada
  • ↑ Annals of the RCYC , Vol. I, p. 70.
  • ↑ RCYC Clubhouse from 1881
  • ↑ Historian to St. Lawrence Market Bruce Bell, quoted in Rotary Voice , September 2007.
  • ↑ Helm of the 2011 defender, Heritage , Robert Hughes, quoted in Canada's Cup 2011 in Sail , Jul 6, 2011.
  • ↑ Henry Sproatt, Dictionary of Architects in Canada
  • ↑ https://rcyc.ca/Heritage/RCYCModels/rcycmodels_p6
  • ↑ Guide to the George Owen Collection, MIT Museum
  • ↑ [ Annals of the RCYC, Vol I , pp. 153-156]
  • ↑ Annals of the RCYC , Vol. I, p. 9.
  • ↑ Charles John Gibson, Dictionary of Architects in Canada
  • ↑ [ 1852-1952 The Royal Canadian Yacht Club , p. 52]
  • ↑ C-Boats
  • ↑ https://www.rochesteryc.com/files/LYRA%20History%201884%20to%201962.searchable.pdf
  • ↑ International Rule models
  • ↑ "Venture II - $250,000 US" .
  • ↑ [ Continuous Evolution – The Continuing Journey of the Canadian International 14 , Parts I, II, Rob Mazza, Kwasind , Aug. 2013, pp 12-23, Kwasind , Sept 2013, pp 12-22]
  • ↑ Red Jacket model and description
  • ↑ Heart of Glass , Daniel Spurr
  • ↑ "Steve Clark - Intl. C Class Catamaran Championship 2010 >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News" . 28 June 2010.
  • ↑ "Out on a Wing" . 26 August 2010.
  • 1 2 3 "Clubhouses and hours of operation" . Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Archived from the original on 27 June 2019 . Retrieved 27 June 2019 .
  • ↑ "M.V. Hiawatha" .
  • ↑ "Polson Iron Works ships built 1912, T.R. Teary, Kwasind, MNCO No 6 Drill Scow" .
  • ↑ Kuitenbrouwer, Peter (6 August 2011). "Doing water-tight deals" . National Post . Archived from the original on 22 November 2013 . Retrieved 21 December 2011 – via canada.com.
  • ↑ https://www.qcyc.ca/sites/default/files/QCYC_files/ourspirit/archives/1980s/1980%20Ontario%20Government%20Toronto%20Island%20Commision.pdf p.11
  • ↑ Simon Stephens, Curator of the Ship Model and Boat Collection, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, UK
  • ↑ Minota model and description
  • ↑ "RCYC Models | Panel 1 - Royal Canadian Yacht Club" .
  • ↑ "George Cuthbertson" .
  • ↑ "RCYC Models | Panel 3 - Royal Canadian Yacht Club" .
  • ↑ "Putting middle-class values to work" . Toronto Star . 13 January 2007.
  • ↑ https://www.maritimeviews.co.uk/british-yachts-yachtsmen/canada-cup-1896/
  • ↑ "RCYC | Previous Commodores - Royal Canadian Yacht Club" .
  • ↑ "Canadian sail team could challenge for America's Cup" .
  • ↑ "Hansard Issue: L017" .
  • ↑ "Maj. Arthur Godfrey Peuchen of Toronto was with wealthy friends on Titanic" . Toronto Star . 9 March 2012.
  • ↑ "The story behind why 12 Toronto streetcar tickets were found in the Titanic wreckage" . 10 May 2023.
  • Official website

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World Class Sailing in Toronto

Since 1852, the Royal Canadian Yacht Club has built a reputation of excellence in the promotion of every aspect of yacht racing and cruising. From Club Fleet Championships to International Events, our Club attracts sailors from all over the world to our Toronto Island Clubhouse.

RCYC’s programs include Racing, Adult Sailing, Junior Sailing and Clinics led by experts throughout the year. We cater to Sailors of all levels - from beginners to Olympic Athletes.

royal canadian yacht club toronto

Regattas, Midweek Racing & More

The RCYC has a long tradition of competitive excellence in yacht racing. Each year, we host a variety of regattas - provincial, national and international. Midweek Racing is held throughout the spring, summer and fall.

ADULT SAILING

Learn to sail, social sailing & racing.

Our Adult Sailing Programs cater to sailors of every skill level - from beginner to high performance. These programs offer an opportunity to experience the sport of sailing without owning your own boat.

JUNIOR SAILING

Summer program since 1925.

The Junior Club has produced international champions along with skilled yachtsmen & yachtswomen. Long-lasting friendships develop over the years as young sailors spend their summer days discovering life on the water. While competitive excellence in sailing is recognized and encouraged, the fundamental objective of the program remains to introduce Junior Sailors to the great sport of sailing.

RCYC Fleets

Community & tradition.

The Club boasts a wide array of Fleets including the Cruising Sailors’ Squadron, J105, 8 Metre, Sharks, I14s etc. In addition, our Club Fleets are available for Members to use throughout the Summer.

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© 2024 Royal Canadian Yacht Club, All rights reserved.

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Royal Canadian Yacht Club

  • Toronto, ON

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150 Cherry St, Toronto, ON, M5A 3L1, Canada

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CLUBHOUSES & HOURS OF OPERATION

City clubhouse, conveniently located at 141 st. george street near the fashionable yorkville district, the city clubhouse is just minutes away by subway or car from the financial and business districts., food & beverage  .

Monday to Friday : 7:00 am - 10:00 pm Saturday : 8:00 am - 10:00 pm Sunday : 8:00 am - 9:00 pm

___________________________________________________

 *If shop closed, please see Quartermaster

  • 4500 square foot Fitness Facility
  • Fitness Studio offering classes in cardio, strength and yoga
  • 5 International Singles Squash Courts
  • 1 Doubles Squash Court
  • 3 Badminton Courts
  • 13.8 metre Heated Indoor Swimming Pool
  • Formal and Informal Dining and Social Areas
  • Meeting and Catering Facilities
  • Childcare Centre
  • Family Change Room
  • Mens Locker Room with a Steam Room
  • Womens Locker Room with a Sauna
  • Private Parking

ISLAND CLUBHOUSE

The island clubhouse offers members and their guests a relaxing getaway. accessed by private launch, the clubhouse is but minutes away from the hectic pace set by the city. .

  • Docks and Dry Sail for over 450 boats
  • Marine Chandlery and Maintenance Services
  • Complete Marine Repair and Servicing
  • 4 Tennis Courts
  • Lawn Bowling
  • 25 Metre Outdoor Swimming Pool
  • Private Parking and Launch Service
  • 2 Dry Sail Cranes
  • 2 Boat Launch Ramps
  • Bicycle, canoe, kayak and paddle board rentals available
  • Day lockers available

CITY STATION (RCYC LAUNCH)

Launch Accessibility Wheelchairs are no longer permitted on either of our launches.  Water taxis will be used by RCYC for Members and guests in wheelchairs. Please inform Member Services at [email protected]   or 416.967.7245 ext. 271 in advance to reserve a taxi.  Advance notice is required as water taxis can be very busy on weekends and holidays. 

​ $25 Daily Rate (24 Hours)

$10 Day Rate (8:00 am to 4:00 pm)

$10 Evening Rate (4:00 pm to 12:00 am)

$10 Overnight Rate (12:00 am to 8:00 am)

30 minutes grace period *Plus applicable taxes

royal canadian yacht club toronto

Royal Canadian Yacht Club

Royal Canadian Yacht Club

Stay more than one night and receive one night complimentary.

The RCYC is pleased to offer your Members Reciprocal Yachting when docks are available. We are currently accepting visiting yachts only with limited availability and by reservation only .  To request anchorage please email [email protected]  or telephone 416-967-7245 ext. 521.

Reservation must be made up to 4-days in advance. All visiting boats must contact the RCYC dockmaster at 416-967-7245 ext. 521 a minimum of two days prior to visit to confirm availability.

The Royal Canadian Yacht Club is a sailing club with a tradition that dates back to 1852. The Club provides yachting activities for racers and cruisers alike from our Island facilities.  Fine dining is available in a formal setting as well as casual eating areas for Members, Yachtsmen, and children of all ages.

RCYC is located on the beautiful Toronto Islands. It is one of the premier private clubs in the world. Our welcoming community consists of active sailors and like-minded individuals who share an interest in yachting, sport, and tradition. RCYC accepts VISA and MasterCard credit cards in the dining spaces, the Sailing Office and Chandlery.

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Royal Canadian Yacht Club

law order toronto review

I watched the new 'Law & Order Toronto: Criminal Intent' premiere so you don't have to

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I will admit that I grew up on Jerry Orbach-era Law & Order , with my love for the crime drama series probably peaking in the early 2000s with the Vincent D'Onofrio-led Criminal Intent spinoff.

Despite being far removed from the Law & Order goings on in an era of TV's fading relevance and ample true crime content options, I was pretty damn excited to learn that Toronto was getting its own instalment in the venerable crime drama universe — dubbed Law & Order Toronto: Criminal Intent .

My excitement only grew when a trailer dropped in January, hinting at a crack mayor plotline and living up to the franchise's tagline of stories "ripped from local headlines" with a nod to the late Mayor Rob Ford's career-defining drug scandal.

So, with managed expectations based on recent trends in a dying network television landscape, I got some snacks ready and settled in front of the TV for the debut of Citytv's Law & Order Toronto: Criminal Intent , eagerly anticipating that initial "dun dun" to kick off the universe's first foray north of the border.

Right off the bat, the franchise-defining spoken intro lost major points for me for the grievous injustice of shamefully pronouncing the second T in Toronto, like some kind of tourist.

The opening shots of the series lay on the local references quickly, with ample views of the city skyline from a party held at the Royal Canadian Yacht Club Island Club, and a reference to a cottage in Muskoka.

Now, here's where I need to give you a spoiler warning: Turn back now if you actually want to watch and (try to) enjoy the episode.

After a heartfelt, and frankly a bit cheesy private conversation with a loved one, one of the party attendees appears to suffer a medical episode before plunging from a party boat into the depths of Toronto Harbour — or so it seems.

At this point, we're about five minutes into the episode, and I don't really know what to think yet. None of the lead cast has been introduced yet, and aside from some marginally convincing drama, my first impression was that of a typically bland Canadian TV production.

Still, the local landmarks and references were enough to keep me in it through the first commercial break (remember commercials?) and see where this was going.

We finally meet the main cast after the first commercial break, with some more location name drops like Marie Curtis Park and Lake Ontario, but more importantly, we get our second "dun dun" of the series — and yes, I will be keeping count.

It's at about this point I begin to notice more stylistic details like a cold colour palette, giving the city a stark impersonal aesthetic. Also, more specific local references, like when Kathleen Munroe's Det. Sgt. Frankie mentions the Island Airport and Aden Young's Det. Harry Graff names the Scarborough Bluffs, Cherry Beach and Woodbine Beach in rapid fire.

If you're wondering why that's the first time I am referencing any of these characters by name, that could have something to do with the complete lack of character exposition in the first 15 minutes of the show.

We do get our first corpse at around this point though. A momentous milestone for the fledgling series. The victim? Some rich dude who was drugged and pushed off a boat. The motive? Probably typical rich dude stuff: but I guess I will need to stick around for another half hour or so to find out.

My interest was briefly rekindled when Karen Robinson's character, Inspector Vivienne Holness, referred to the victim as a nerd.

However, at this stage of the game, I was struggling to see which local headline this story was ripped from, and the Toronto-specific geographical reference and casual insults were the only things keeping my attention.

The third "dun dun" of the episode cuts to Toronto's Little India area on Gerrard Street East, where police question a textile shop owner.

Our fourth "dun dun" brought me back into things when the infamous adult entertainment club Filmore's Hotel was name-dropped, where the murder victim appeared to have been having a secret liaison despite being wealthy enough to book a room at literally anywhere other than Filmore's.

At this point in the episode, the murder victim's wife and primary suspect in his death, is herself seriously injured in a hit and run — throwing the police's theory off the rails and raising interest in a new suspect.

Fifth "dun dun" and we are now in a private home on Millbank Avenue near Bathurst and St. Clair for a melodramatic exchange between the investigators and their new suspect.

After a few too many glimpses of Toronto's one-per-cent lifestyle via lavish mansions, the episode finally takes the investigators to a basketball court in the Moss Park neighbourhood to follow their latest lead and give viewers a taste of how most locals live.

We are two-thirds of the way through this hour-long premiere, and I feel like I have voluntarily subjected myself to something with the character depth equivalent of the much-maligned Madame Web,  but none of the ironic humour.

But this appears to be a turning point in the episode. The investigators are building a solid motive for a crime for a Crown attorney, and this optimism is reflected with a warmer colour palette as the team walks through Nathan Phillips Square towards Old City Hall, loudly discussing a murder case — which I'm going to have to assume is not standard Toronto Police operating procedure.

Then the Columbo "gotcha" moment finally happens, and it's pretty anticlimactic. A rather unconvincing web of cryptocurrency and love. I'd spoil it but there isn't much to spoil.

The credits roll, and I get the sinking realization that I will never get that hour of my life back.

But just as I was formulating my final rating, the trailer for next week's episode dropped — promising a story that appears based on the condo board shooting in Vaughan that made headlines across the nation in 2022.

Will I tune in for that episode next Thursday? Maybe. Will I tune in for the season's fourth episode featuring a Rob Ford crack scandal storyline? Absolutely.

Do I recommend you make Law & Order Toronto: Criminal Intent part of your Thursday evening ritual? That's going to be a hard no.

My overall rating is 4.6 subway station beef patties out of 10.

Join the conversation Load comments

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The show's writing staff dig into the many Torontos the city contains, from glass-walled mansions on the Bridle Path to unhoused people lying in sleeping bags under the seedy marquee of Filmores strip club on Dundas Street East. Steve Wilkie/Citytv

Law & Order Toronto: Criminal Intent, Episode 7 shoot

Police headquarters set, etobicoke. friday, nov. 10, 5 p.m..

The set is sprawling: terrazzo floors, Deco ironwork, a dozen desks (currently empty, because this scene is just the leads). There’s an interrogation room and a conference room. There’s a hallway lined with portraits of police dogs. There are fully dressed sets for a jail cell, hospital room and forensics lab (glass-front fridge full of vials, stainless steel morgue drawers), plus a swing set done up as a victim’s hippie-chic apartment (vinyl record player, macrame).

Dozens of crew members adjust lights and blackout screens around a whiteboard, a.k.a. the Murder Board, marked up with a timeline. The episode’s director, Winnifred Jong, calls “Action, please” (the “please” proving that we are in Canada), and the scene begins.

Two detective sergeants, a man and a woman – the A-team of the Specialized Criminal Investigations Unit – stare down the board, thinking aloud. In moments of significance, their eyes flick to one another. He is Henry Graff (Aden Young) – face like Pedro Pascal, voice like a subway rumbling under a sidewalk. She is Frankie Bateman (Kathleen Munroe) – palpable intelligence, magnetic blue eyes. Their dialogue is dizzy with victims, suspects, clues, investigative jargon: “I don’t think Roman was the one recording Clara. Ten days ago, Mark found a video on Rachel’s tablet.”

So far, so very Dick Wolf. The dominant producer in U.S. television, Wolf Entertainment oversees three hit franchises ( Law & Order , Chicago and FBI ), which own three entire nights of television (the 8, 9 and 10 p.m. slots) on two U.S. and Canadian networks (NBC and CBS, City and Global).

But in this police station, the wall map is of Toronto, and the name drops are unabashedly 416: Cherry Beach, Bay Street, the Rosedale ravine, the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Episode 1 begins with a beauty shot of the skyline from Lake Ontario; a scene card reads SINGH FABRICS, GERRARD STREET EAST; an outdoor walk-and-talk moves from new to Old City Hall.

Wolf Entertainment has licensed its shows to other countries before – for example, there are French and Russian adaptations of Law & Order: Criminal Intent – but those took existing U.S. scripts and made local adjustments.

royal canadian yacht club toronto

The Toronto iteration of the show is the biggest investment Rogers has made in original Canadian programming. Amanda Matlovich/Citytv

This Toronto iteration (a co-production of Wolf Entertainment, Universal Television, Rogers Television, Lark Productions and Cameron Pictures Inc.) is the first international franchise to create its own plots and scripts. The showrunner is Tassie Cameron ( Pretty Hard Cases , Rookie Blue ). The stories are ripped from Canadian headlines. The cast and crew are homegrown. It’s also the biggest investment Rogers has made in original Canadian programming.

When Cameron first got the invitation to write a trial episode – she had to compete for the gig against other (unnamed) writers – she immediately thought about … the CN Tower. “It sounds silly, but I pictured the Toronto skyline with the Law & Order font,” she says. “I want to highlight the city I love, that I feel patriotic about. I understand how it might seem weird to celebrate a city in a show about murder, but making a world-class franchise here will be really exciting if we pull it off.”

They hope to export it around the world, including the United States. The cliffhanger question is, will Canadians watch?

Crown attorney office set

While the crew repositions cameras in the police station, Munroe and Young take a break in this otherwise-unoccupied set (wood panelling, black quilted leather chairs, fireplace). In their Holmes-Watson dynamic – all partners across the Law & Order franchise have a Holmes-Watson dynamic – she’s the Watson, fact-driven, empathic. He’s the Holmes, a font of esoteric knowledge, a seeker of motivation, a pusher of psychic buttons to provoke an unguarded response.

“Bateman traps them in her tractor beam, while I wander around and examine for clues,” says Young, who’s 52 and Canadian-Australian. In his 30-year career, he’s worked with Bruce Beresford ( Black Robe ), co-starred on stage with Cate Blanchett ( Hedda Gabler ), and won awards for his lead role in the Sundance series Rectify .

We’re in Episode 7 (out of 10), and the actors have begun to banter like their characters. Young was offered his part without an audition; Munroe, 41, born in Hamilton, had to read for hers, even though she’s been in series from AppleTV+ ( City on Fire ), Prime ( Patriot ) and HBO Canada ( Call Me Fitz ). She’s also appeared in five – five! – other Wolf Entertainment shows: Law & Order: Organized Crime , Law & Order: Special Victims Unit , Chicago P.D. , Chicago Med and FBI .

royal canadian yacht club toronto

Cast members (left to right) Karen Robinson, Aden Young, Kathleen Munroe, and K.C. Collins pose for a photo at a press junket as they promote the television series "Law & Order Toronto: Criminal Intent" in Toronto on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024. Chris Young/The Canadian Press

Munroe: “We had to do a chemistry read.”

Young: “I had jet lag, so she had the chemistry for us both.”

Munroe: “I was the chemistry and, frankly, the read.”

Becoming headliners in the Wolfiverse was “gobsmacking,” both admit. As a child home sick from school, Munroe watched the OG Jill Hennessy-Jerry Orbach Law & Order “from morning to night,” she says. “It formed my impression of what New York City was, what TV crime drama was. It had a feeling of grit, and more normal-looking people than most TV.”

“It was the inspiration for what’s now podcast territory – true crime, case files,” Young says. “I’ve always been intrigued by crime in that regard: how detectives are almost explorers, going into these worlds they know very little of, whatever the murder drags them into. And they have to investigate that world, as an actor does, be it seamen, or strip clubs, or corrupt politicians. Graff looks at a situation almost like an X-ray, trying to imagine: What, of everything on Earth, led to this moment now? He goes backward and looks not just at the visible but also the invisible.”

The difference between a Wolf show and everything else, Munroe says, is “stamina. The first couple weeks, I felt like I’d been thrown into a marathon after lying on the couch for a year. The amount of work we get to do, the amount of writing for these two characters who are operating at the top of their game, the extraordinary guest actors who come in – it’s a thrill.”

And because this is Law & Order Toronto , they depict cops differently than most U.S. series. “So far, we haven’t had to use this,” Young says, gesturing to the prop gun in his costume holster. “It’s rubber, by the way. When we were doing our press photos and footage, the express rule was: No guns. Our weapon is this.” He pulls a fountain pen out of his pocket and mimes writing in a notebook.

Munroe: “We’re not brutes. We don’t use force. We haven’t said, ‘Get down on the ground!’ yet. We use tactics to gently pull confessions.”

As well, she continues, “The writers have incorporated a social conscience that’s central to our feeling of national identity. We try to vilify the right things and celebrate the right things. We’re looking at the systemic issues that impact the lives of the criminals we deal with. That feels like a Canadian conversation.”

In an episode about recent immigrants, for example, “We communicate with them,” Young says. “We’re compassionate about the plight that got them here. We feel for the horror they find themselves in, in a way that I truly believe reflects what it means to be Canadian.”

Munroe: “There’s been a real effort to not be exploitative. To not take these real people’s stories and make them sensational. We’re still Law & Order. ”

Young: “We’re still gonna bully some suspects.”

Munroe: “We’re still gonna get the bad guy. But we’re careful about how we show the victims, the bodies. At the centre of this show is life and death, and that’s never far from our minds.”

Young: “The tragic reality is, if Graff and Bateman come into your life, it’s a bad day.”

Production offices

The usual rabbit warren of tiny offices, mismatched swivel chairs and kitchenettes with dirty mugs in the sink you find behind the scenes of any production. Cameron and producer Erin Haskett sit in an unclaimed office crowded with spare desks, talking about their bible. In television, a bible is the backbone of a series, a document that usually runs 50 to a few hundred pages, describing the characters and their backstories, the milieu and tone of the show, and multiple season arcs. The Law & Order bible is 1,000 pages long.

“It answers every question,” Haskett says. “How do they look at cases, handle story elements, set up postproduction?”

The basic format is not to be tinkered with. “Each episode stands alone, so you can drop in,” Cameron says. “They take on primal subjects. They’re a little familiar but always have a twist. They’re plotted cleverly, so the audience can play along. And they play fair with the audience, not cheating with the clues, assuming viewers are intelligent.”

Linear (non-streaming) television may be waning, but the Wolfiverse remains strong, and Rogers’s senior vice-president of television, Hayden Mindell, believes a Toronto-based Law & Order is “a natural fit” for his audience. And though Jimmy Fallon cracked a joke in his monologue when the series was announced – “How do you plead, sorry or not sorry?” – murder, unfortunately, is not a stretch here. “I’ve been writing Canadian crime stories for 20 years,” Cameron says. “I haven’t felt hemmed in by our goodness.”

She does tuck in a few Easter eggs. Bateman’s mother is a journalist, for example, and Bateman remarks on how poorly they’re paid. Cameron’s mother is the renowned journalist Stevie Cameron. “We haven’t written a cameo for Drake,” Cameron says, grinning. “But if he calls, we’ll figure something out.”

As well, she and her diverse writing staff dig into the many Torontos the city contains, from glass-walled mansions on the Bridle Path to unhoused people lying in sleeping bags under the seedy marquee of Filmores strip club on Dundas Street East, “so we’re not just showing my authentic Toronto, but lots of people’s.”

The Criminal Intent format, with its focus on motive, is particularly well-suited to the Canadian character, Haskett believes: “It’s about persistence, doggedness, a quest for justice. It’s more about curiosity than judgment. These stories are as much why-done-it as whodunit, so it’s really important to understand the characters.” And, she says laughing, “our detectives do sometimes say they’re sorry.”

As for the differences between Canadian and American law, Cameron is trying not to overexplain. The detectives work with a deputy Crown attorney, Theo Forrester (K.C. Collins), not a district attorney. Crowns are not referred to as “counsellor.” (In Canadian courts, opposing lawyers call each other, “My friend.”) Robes are worn. Miranda Rights are not read (we have Charter Rights). Amusingly, so accustomed were the writers to American procedurals, even they were shocked to discover that, in Canada, a suspect in an interrogation does not have the right to demand a lawyer.

The one thing Cameron and Co. have never done with LOT:CI , as they call it, is take their responsibility to the franchise lightly. They’ve experienced first-hand how beloved it is. “Every Uber driver who asks what I do is like, ‘Whoa, that’s cool!’ ” she says. “The owner of the food store I go to hugged me when I told her. I have to keep my head down, type the words, rely on the muscle memory that I’ve made television before. Because if I let myself think about the hugeness too much, I’ll be paralyzed.

“You try to forget that you’re making Law & Order , and then when it matters, you try to remember that you’re making Law & Order .” Dun-dun.

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