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Jackstays and Jacklines- The options for the cruising sailor

jackstays for sailing yachts

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jackstays for sailing yachts

Upffront.com

Jacklines and jackstays - important things to know

Published date: august 11 2023.

Wichard jackline

Jacklines or jackstays are lines attached to the fore and aft of your boat, allowing your crew to clip on via their safety tether and will prevent ‘jolly jack tar’ (the old name for a sailor) from falling overboard. These lines are vital in heavy conditions, especially, when you require a crew member to go forward to the mast or bow.

Whilst the basics of these lines and clips are apparent to the majority of skippers, there are a few considerations to ensure that these safety lines operate properly. Firstly, you should ensure that the jacklines should have limited ability to stretch and should be of sufficient strength for the purpose. Many sailors and event organisers favour webbing over wire jacklines with the webbing in a contrasting colour and fabricated so that it does not roll underfoot. 

Earlier, inferior webbing jacklines were more prone to chafing and sun/UV damage than wire. However, modern webbing materials are more chafe-resistant and fabricated to avoid problems with vibration and wear.

Like, for example, Wichard jacklines are easily identifiable at night thanks to the retro-reflective strip incorporated into the webbing. Its anti-abrasion sides also prevent it from premature wear. This short video from Wichard shows the jacklines available in our shop and the installation process on your boat:

The lines should be properly secured fore and aft so that they can readily manage the force of a person falling. Wherever feasible, the lines should be placed close to the centre line of the boat, so that the safety line will prevent a sailor from falling into the water. 

jack-lines-tether-clip

Image credit - SV Ragtop

If the line were too close to the edge of the boat and the tether too long, a crew member could fall into the water still attached to the boat and they could drown in such circumstances. It is therefore essential to consider this aspect when placing your jacklines and choosing the safety lines for your crew.

Wichard jackline in use-1

Image credit - Wichard Marine

It is always preferable that crew members should use a double safety line, and where they have to unclip and clip on again, say when traversing the boat, crew members should be taught that they should always clip on the second clip prior to releasing the original one.  A crew member should be able to clip onto a jackline on leaving the safety of the cabin and unclip as they return, to ensure their safety.

Jackline near cockpit

Image credit - YouTube

Within the cockpit and other working areas of your yacht, you should also have clipping-on points for the crew members to attach their tethers to, and these should accommodate up to two-thirds of your crew without relying on the jackstays.  And always remember, even in the lightest of conditions, when you might not be clipped on, you should always have one hand for you and one hand for the boat! To see our range of safety equipment, including modern purpose-fabricated jacklines and safety tethers, please click below:

Safety range

If you have any questions regarding this article or want expert, impartial advice on any aspect of your boat’s equipment, please feel free to contact Upffront by email, at [email protected]

  Dave Proctor  

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Jackstays and Jacklines- The options for the cruising sailor

jackstays for sailing yachts

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jackstays for sailing yachts

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Jackstays (deck safety lines): Understanding their Construction and Usage

jackstays for sailing yachts

Whether you call them Guardlines, Safety Lines, Jackstays or Lifelines, these deck lines and harness tethers are essential pieces of equipment on any boat. This latest article from Jimmy Green explores construction and essential items of knowledge.

Published 2 months ago

jackstays for sailing yachts

Jackstays (Lifelines): What you Need to Know

Jackstays, also known as Lifelines, are laid along the deck,and fixed at either end so you can clip onto them with your harness tether.

The terminology around these deck lines and harness tethers, along with the guard wires that pass around the stanchions that make up your guard rails, can be a little confusing because sailors can use either or even all three to mean the same thing. To clarify what I will be writing about and hopefully to avoid any confusion, I have listed them below under what we call them here in the UK, but I have included some other popular alternative terms as well:

  • webbing, wire or rope laid along the deck for clipping to with your personal tether – also known as jacklines, lifelines or deck safety lines.

Guard Wires:

  • wire or fibre running between your stanchions to form a balustrade around the deck – also known as lifelines or guard rails.

Safety Lines:

  • the tether you use to attach yourself from your harness (which is commonly integral to your lifejacket) to the yacht – also known as safety tethers, harness lines or lifelines.

jackstays for sailing yachts

What can Jackstays be made up with?

Jackstays can be made from rope, wire, or webbing, but webbing is by far the most popular solution nowadays.  Traditionally, 1×19 stainless steel wire, either plain or PVC coated, was the most common method.  Webbing is now the go-to solution. Recently, 100% Dyneema 12 strand rope has become more popular.

The Advantages of Webbing

High Tenacity Polyester Webbing:

  • lies flat on the deck, so it does not move or roll under your feet.
  • will not mark or damage your deck.
  • is kind to the hands.
  • is ergonomic when it comes to clipping on with your safety tether hook.
  • will break your fall because it has some ‘give.’
  • can be attached with shackles, lanyards, a webbing three-bar slide (or two for peace of mind) a purpose-designed and manufactured jackstay webbing adjuster or a cow hitch (at one end only).
  • Jackstay webbing is high denier, high tenacity webbing and should have a minimum break load of 2000kg. This compares favourably with stainless steel wire.
  • lasts well in the sun if you specify high denier Polyester, and not Polyamid (nylon)
  • resists chafing exceptionally well while on deck, although you should take care to route the jackstays so that they do not rub against any potential wear points – some ‘fluffing’ of the edge fibres through natural wear and tear is normal.
  • can be visually checked for signs of UV or physical damage.

A note here on UV endurance – the strength of the webbing depends on the duration of exposure and the strength of the sun’s harmful rays.

The deterioration will be gradual, and the first indications will be fading of any dye (colour) It is good practice to stow webbing jackstays below when the yacht is not at sea to maximise their working life.

The Disadvantages of Webbing

There are only a few downsides, but webbing:

  • will not last as long in the sun as stainless steel wire, although it will fare a little better than Dyneema.
  • is more susceptible to damage or wear and tear than wire.
  • requires more frequent adjustment to maintain the correct tension.

The Alternatives to Webbing

Stainless Steel 1×19 Wire

jackstays for sailing yachts

  • Plain, uncovered 1×19 has a smooth finish, but 4mm only has a breaking strain of 1400kg which is significantly lower than a typical harness safety line, so the diameter should be a minimum 5mm.
  • Plain wire has excellent abrasion and UV resistance, although PVC will deteriorate in the sun.
  • If you prefer PVC coated stainless steel wire, this will increase the diameter from 5mm to 8 or 9mm which is then a significant roll hazard.
  • may require clunky terminations.

12 Strand 100% Dyneema

jackstays for sailing yachts

  • is extremely strong e.g. 5mm diameter Hampidjan’s DynIce Dux has a spliced break load of 4300kg.
  • is yielding underfoot (squashy )
  • lasts well in the sun and can be treated with Polyurethane to enhance UV resistance.
  •  Can be sleeved with polyester tube webbing to protect it from the sun and further reduce any chances of rolling underfoot.
  • can be spliced onboard if you trust your own handiwork.
  • offers a variety of different splicing terminations for adjustment or cow hitch at one end.

Strength Comparison for Stainless Steel Wire, High Tenacity Jackstay Webbing and 12 Strand 100% Hollowbraid Dyneema

  • 4mm 1 x 19 stainless steel wire, MBL = 1400kg
  • 5mm 1 x 19 stainless steel wire, MBL = 2190kg
  • High Tenacity Polyester Jackstay Webbing, MBL = minimum 2100kg, can be up to 3000kg
  • 5mm LIROS D Pro Static = 2450kg
  • 5mm Hampidjan DynIce Dux 4800kg (strength after professional splicing = 4300kg)

Jackstay Fitting Considerations

Safe attachment and detachment.

It is essential that your jackstays are set up so that you can clip on before you leave the cockpit and be able to venture as far forward (and aft) as possible without having to unclip, even temporarily.

The jackstays will need to run past the cockpit adjacent to the coaming so that they are within safe reach.  They also need to avoid any obstacles on deck such as opening hatches, running rigging lines and cleats, passing inside the shrouds to provide a clear pathway to the foredeck (or after deck)

Overboard Casualty Prevention

The jackstays should be fitted as near to the centre line as practicable to minimise the risk of falling over the rail while still attached, typically following the curve of the coach roof, although this may still be too near the guardrail for comfort.

Jackstays routed too close to the gunwale or toe rail may not prevent a fall into the water, especially on the lower, leeward side with the yacht heeled over.

If the jackstay line is near enough to fall over the rail while clipped on, it will be well worth considering shorter tethers to limit the distance.

There are three hook versions of the safety line tether which typically have one shorter tail. Three hooks are essential for staying clipped on when transferring from the jackstay to another fitting.

N.B. The MAIB Safety Bulletin 1/2018 states that jackstays should be routed to minimise the possibility of a safety clip hook getting trapped underneath any deck fitting, and mooring cleats in particular, see the quote below:

“SAFETY LESSON – To prevent the strength of a safety harness tether from becoming compromised in service due to lateral loading on the tether hook, the method used to anchor the end of the tether to the vessel should be arranged to ensure that the tether hook cannot become entangled with deck fittings or other equipment.”

Measuring your Jackstays

All jackstays should be fitted so that there is a degree of lift in the centre of the line before any significant load is applied. The correct amount of lift will depend on the stretch properties of the jackstay material and should be proportional to the overall length of the jackstay.

Wire does not stretch at all, so wire jackstays should be fitted with some slack to create the requisite lift. The strain on the end fittings caused by a heavy casualty falling against the middle of a bar-tight wire with their full body weight could be dangerously excessive.

Conversely, polyester webbing does stretch, so the jackstays should always be kept taut to prevent you from falling too far, which may require regular adjustment. Pulling your safety tether tight against the jackstay may add some control to your balance in wavy conditions.

Dyneema has very low stretch, a bit more than wire but not as much as Polyester webbing, so the same principles apply as wire.

A jackstay that is too taut may leave no gap underneath, rendering the clipping on of the safety hook trickier than it needs to be.

Jackstay Attachment Point Selection

Jackstay strong points should be selected according to the principles mentioned above in the sections on Fitting Considerations and Overboard Casualty Prevention If there are no suitable fixing points where they are needed, it is not advisable to make do with existing fittings that do not adhere to the principles mentioned above, it will be preferable to fit some purpose-designed U Bolts or Eye Bolts in the correct position.

jackstays for sailing yachts

Webbing Jackstay Terminations

Making do with machine stitching not designed for the purpose, or even sewing your own webbing, is not advisable if you want to feel confident about venturing out from the safety of the cockpit in rough weather.

Once you have found a reputable source for the webbing and the stitching, there are several different options for sewing loops in the ends:

  • Small Sewn Loop – for attaching to a shackle
  • Small Sewn Loop with a stainless Ring, D Ring, or Triangle included
  • Large Sewn Loop – with room for multiple turns of a lanyard
  • Twisted Sewn Loop – for creating the perfect cow hitch

Twisted loops are for creating a cow hitch attachment in one end – pass the other end around a strongpoint and back through the twisted loop – allowing the hitch to sit comfortably around the deck fitting.

Of course, you could simply take a length of webbing and add a specially designed jackstay adjuster at each end. Makefast UK and Wichard France manufacture them, to name a couple.

Webbing Jackstay Adjustment

Jackstays can be attached to strong points such as Deck U Bolts with extra-wide shackles, but they are not such a clever idea at both ends because that will make the measuring critical and obviate any adjustment.

Lanyards at one end make the initial measuring, deployment, and adjustment more straightforward.

As an absolute minimum, the lanyard will require the amount of turns to ensure a break load comparable to the sewn webbing and the spliced rope.

Six Basic Steps to Specifying Your Jackstays

  • Do your research.
  • Settle on webbing, wire, or rope.
  • Establish the best endpoints and the most practicable route on deck.
  • Choose suitable terminations.
  • Decide how you want the ends finished and attached.
  • Measure carefully.

…………………………

jackstays for sailing yachts

About the Author

Jimmy Green Marine is a family-run business founded by brothers Alistair and Mike Green, based in the coastal fishing village of Beer in East Devon. The company started as a Mail Order Chandlers in 1981 and has continually evolved from attending Boat Shows and Boat Jumbles in the early days to now trading globally online.

Four decades of exporting experience combined with an intuitive website shipping calculator means that you can have your order delivered to your home, business or direct to your yacht anywhere worldwide.

Their flagship, innovative Custom Build website system provides an instant quote for all your professionally spliced and finished wire and rope rigging, mooring and anchoring solutions.

You can access this online from wherever you can get an internet connection, however remote.

Alistair Green is an experienced sailor and rigger with over 40 years of experience in the marine industry. He is passionate about providing his customers with the best possible products and services and is always looking for new ways to improve the business.

If you are looking for a reliable and experienced marine supplier, then Jimmy Green Marine is the perfect choice.

Visit their website today to learn more about their products and services.

JimmyGreen.com

 Related Links:

  • About Jimmy Green Marine
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  • Worldwide Shipping
  • Jimmy Green Marine joins Noonsite.com as Premium Advertising Partner (April 2023)

Other Articles by Jimmy Green Marine:

  • Running Rigging – Know your Ropes (February 2024)
  • Anchors – What to Consider when Buying or Replacing an Anchor (January 2024)
  • Bridles – Extolling the Virtues of V-Shaped Bridles (December 2023)
  • Mooring Lines – Horses for Courses (November 2023)
  • When to Replace your Standing Rigging (October 2023)
  • Ten Reasons to Whip and Stitch Your Ropes (September 2023)
  • How to Choose your Next Anchor Chain (August 2023)
  • How to Choose a New Halyard (July 2023)
  • The Uses and Benefits of Rope Splicing Onboard a Yacht (May 2023)

………………………………

The opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not reflect the view of Noonsite.com or World Cruising Club.

Find out all news, reports, links and comments posted on Noonsite, plus cruising information from around the world, by subscribing to our FREE monthly newsletter. Go to https://www.noonsite.com/newsletter/ .

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Setting Jackstay Tension – Dave Porter Provides Insight

Brian Brickler and Dave Porter, Lake Beulah Yacht Club, discuss Aha! Insights on setting jackstay tension for the thicker jackstays on a C-Scow with SailZing.com.

Loose Jackstays – Watch for Mast “Pulse”

David Porter Jackstays and Mast Pulse

SailZing.com’s Rob Hudson de Tarnowsky was lucky to come across this insight being shared at the 2017 ILYA Championship Regatta hosted by the Lake Geneva Yacht Club and Inland Lake Yachting Association. Lake Geneva, WI

Share this Video: https://youtu.be/jTVm_P7IhKM

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____________________________ SHARE YOUR AHA! INSIGHT If you have an Aha! Insight, send your 2 minute or shorter video to [email protected] .

Aha! Insights capture personal moments when you finally figured something out that really improved your sailing performance. These are also intended to give thanks to those who may have enlightened you. “I finally figured out how to pick a gate mark when Bill Jones shared this with me…” ____________________________

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Offshore sailing basic equipment: Jackstay

  • November 10th, 2021
  • Sailing Accessories

With my second interview on solo sailing the Atlantic Ocean in a small boat finished (read the article with Johannes Erdmann, who crossed the big ocean in a 27 feet boat here ) I am again thankful for such a rich insight. And another hint how to improve my sailing equipment. Whilst Hinner Weiler, with whom I´ve had the first interview was pointing my interest towards sleep management – bringing me to buy a mechanical egg-timer – Johannes focused on the safety aspect in offshore sailing. And right so! As “ordinary” as it may sound for skippers, he directed my attention towards an otherwise neglected detail.

jackstays for sailing yachts

See, when I sail, I usually wear a life jacket , of course, and when I sail at night I do attach myself to a tether that in itself is connected to the boat. Mostly I fasten the belt to a stanchion or the reeling. Johannes was talking a different setup and I believe that is the one I will choose and copy for my own #atlanticloop: for light and medium weather/wave pattern I will skip wearing the heavy weight life jacket and put on a life belt instead. That takes off weight of my shoulders and will assure a much more nimble walk around on deck.

Common sense: Be safe!

Instead of attaching the life belt/tether to a stanchion or reeling, I will attach a proper jackstay on the deck of my boat. This allows for even more freedom and range of operation by skipping the annoying stop at every stanchion to switch reeling, for example when I have to go to the foredeck. I ordered a jackstay which was delivered just one day before I left for Berlin Boat Show starting this week. Being lucky that momentarily the boat market is literally sold out, we decided to have my own First 27 SE on display so I can join my professional occupation with my private project and fit the new jackstay.

jackstays for sailing yachts

The one I chose is made of a very thick and heavy quality. It has a CE and ISO-certificate and upon checking I would say I is able to easily hold my weight when going MOB. I am a very safety-focused skipper anywayand would never ever risk my life for sailing, but in this case – sailing alone – knowing that there is no First Officer, no sailing mate and in this no second brain to check for my wellbeing too, I don´t want to make savings on my safety. The jackstay I bought came with an 80 Euros price tag.

jackstays for sailing yachts

For me this is a very emotional issue: I am a father of the two best boys in the world and I would be hilariously stupid to risk seeing them growing up. Very vividly I remember the most tragic fate of Chinese pro sailor Guo Chuan who was lost at sea: I may be one of the few last people to interview this fine, enormously sympathetic skipper before he left for his Transpac record attempt in a trimaran – all that was found of him was a severed tether … Well, safety first. Always! So let´s see how to attach.

Fitting the jackstay properly

The jackstay I bought has a length of 12 metres, that is 3 metres more than my boat is long. The Jackstay comes with metal clamps and can be adjusted to the length desired. There is a heavy loop on one end which can einter be fitted throught the mooring clamp or – as I tried to mock here – through the Dyneema-loop for my removable baby-stay for the heavy jib.

jackstays for sailing yachts

The color of my jackstay is black, matching neatly the solar panels I am going to fit to the boat this winter. The safety belt can then led aft: Either to the aft mooring clamp or to a loop at the desired position. I figured that most of the time when in the cockpit I can resume attaching my safety tether to the reeling and that I will only use the jackstay when proceeding to go to the bow or at the mast, so II guess I´ll let it end right where the Gennaker sheet blocks are attached.

jackstays for sailing yachts

Next step is the reduction of the length, which can be done by myself in simply cutting the rope, melting its end with a lighter or, which I prefer, having a sailmaker doing the job and properly sewing the end instead of just melting it down. In this, the sailmaker can overlap the short end and have a properly sealed fitting.

Revisiting the safety concept of my boat

I am thankful to Johannes who brought me to this idea. With the right product found I instantly ordered the second jackstay – of course I will fit one to either side of the boat – and upon end of the boat show find a sailmaker to make the adjustments I have in mind. A proper life belt is ordered too and underway and I am happy for this new adding to my equipment list. This is a good thing!

jackstays for sailing yachts

Next up will be a complete new setup for the #atlanticloop safety equipment: The new EPIRP I bought will receive its right place (not remain in the deep of the navigation-equipment box , I am currently looking for a lightweight life raft, the fire extinguisher will also receive a fixed place and a basic leak repair set will also be purchased. I am thinking of attending a SOLAS Survival at Sea training, re-named World Sailing course, I guess. What do you think about this? Looking forward to your comments.

Also interesting to read:

The safety concept of my (first) yacht

Practicing the MOB code of conduct

Life jacket lessons for sailing kids

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  • Lifejackets Harnesses

International Sailing Federation (ISAF) Guidelines to Jacklines

jackstays for sailing yachts

The International Sailing Federation (ISAF), the world governing body for the sport of sailing, has established clear guidelines for ISAF-sanctioned events, and these are generally applied to offshore racing-ISAF-sanctioned, or not-around the world. Among the recommendations are the following:

Jackstays shall be:

1. Attached to through-bolted or welded deckplates or other suitable and strong anchor points fitted on deck, port and starboard of the boats centerline to provide secure attachments for safety harness;

2. Comprising stainless-steel 1 x 19 wire of minimum diameter 5 millimeters (3/16 inches), high-modulus polyethylene rope (such as Dyneema/Spectra), or webbing of equivalent strength; which, when made from stainless-steel wire shall be uncoated and used without any sleeving;

3. 20 kilonewton (2,040 foot-kilograms or 4,500 foot-pounds) minimum breaking strain webbing is recommended.

Clipping Points shall be provided:

1. Attached to through-bolted or welded deckplates or other suitable and strong anchorage points adjacent to stations such as the helm, sheet winches and masts, where crewmembers work for long periods; which, together with jackstays and static safety lines shall enable a crew member

a. to clip on before coming on deck and unclip after going below;

b. whilst continuously clipped on, to move readily between the working areas on deck and the cockpit(s) with the minimum of clipping and unclipping.

2. The provision of clipping points shall enable two-thirds of the crew to be simultaneously clipped on without depending on jackstays.

3. Warning: Beware of U-bolts as clipping points; see OSR 5.02.1a (This rule states that non-locking carabiners can slip off if rotated around the U-bolt.)

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Enjoying life in harness

Ken Endean

  • January 24, 2017

In a sideways look at safety, Ken Endean explores ways to wear a harness and stay safe onboard without the usual discomfort and inconvenience

Harness

Every yacht should have a clip on point or jackstay within reach of the companionway Credit: Ken Endean

The term ‘safety equipment’ is commonly applied to items that could more accurately be classed as ‘emergency equipment’, because they are for use in situations that are already unsafe. Flares, personal locator beacons , lifejackets , fire extinguishers, dan buoys and MOB recovery devices only come into their own when a hazard has turned into a full-blooded accident – in other words, when safety precautions have failed.

On the other hand, some pieces of kit do serve to maintain safety and the obvious example is the safety harness, which is intended to keep its wearer on board (or at least in close contact with the vessel) and hopefully avoid the need to use the emergency equipment. When my wife and I started cruising we wore harnesses on night passages or in rough conditions. Nowadays, even in fair weather and particularly when our boat is under autopilot, we have become much more aware of the risk of carelessness (and the nightmare of one person going below and later returning on deck to find an empty cockpit), so our standard practice is to don harnesses for the whole passage.

I used to resent the discomfort associated with a harness – because it hampers the wearer’s ability to shed or adjust any clothing underneath. When coastal cruising in warm places like southern Brittany, we often find ourselves thrashing along with flying spray and in hot sunshine, when sitting in the cockpit demands waterproof protection but anyone who goes below – to the chart table or the galley – soon becomes overheated, because the cabin is like an oven. If they are wearing a harness over their waterproofs, it must be removed before they can strip off any other clothes, and replaced before they return on deck. That’s not difficult, but it takes time and replacing it might be forgotten if they are in a hurry.

Harness below jacket

Harness

In a warm cabin, outer clothing can be discarded while the harness is still worn

I once had a similar problem when participating in a corporate team building exercise that involved short races in chartered yachts. The skipper for our boat came back from the race briefing with instructions for all crew to wear lifejackets with harnesses at all times. I expected to be a deck hand, and dressed to withstand a cold soaking. But then, as we approached the start line, the navigator’s complexion turned green and he moved close to the lee rail, handing me the race instructions with the words: ‘I think you had better do this.’ For the next frantic hour I was mainly in the cabin, darting between the chart table and the hatch, with no chance to modify my many layers of fabric, until I was practically dissolving in my own sweat.

jackstays for sailing yachts

A waterproof jacket can easily be opened for ventilation if the safety harness is worn underneath it

I prefer to enjoy sailing without such drawbacks and a few years ago we found a way of avoiding discomfort: by wearing our harnesses below our outer clothes. To anyone who has not tried it, this may sound ridiculous but it works surprisingly well. The safety lanyard simply leads out from below the hem of the waterproof jacket and down to its clip on point or jackstay.

Lifejackets to hand

If the wearer goes below and decides to shed their outer layer of clothing, they are still wearing the harness; in the event of an urgent call for ‘All hands on deck!’ or ‘Come up and look at these dolphins,’ they can re-emerge and clip on without any delay.

Even if they go overboard, this arrangement should not create difficulties. I experimented by suspending myself in a harness, with the lanyard passed over an attic roof beam, and the straps simply caused my jacket to bunch up, under my arms and in front of my face. It was relatively comfortable and may even create an extra layer of protection.

Continues below…

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There is one obvious snag: this technique cannot be used with a combined harness and lifejacket, because inflation would be restricted by the outer garments. By not wearing lifejackets with our harnesses, we are at greater risk in certain kinds of accident (eg. sudden sinking). On the other hand, if weather or sea state deteriorate quickly (a much more common crisis) it is more likely that each crew member will already be wearing a harness. To cater for most other emergencies, the lifejackets are stowed close to the main hatch.

In my view our wearing of harnesses under outer clothing strikes a reasoned balance between risks and benefits, providing a high degree of safety while not detracting from enjoyment. I imagine that some people will disagree with this policy but I like to think it illustrates a principle: that safety equipment should be easy to use.

Harness

On London Apprentice, the helmsman clips on low down in the cockpit

For safety equipment to function properly it may also be necessary to carry out some preparatory work on the yacht. With harnesses, that means ensuring that there are sufficient clip on points or jackstays, fitted in the right places.

In a knockdown , harnessed crew could find themselves attached to the boat but outboard of the lifelines. Mary and I nearly experienced this when a wave thumped London Apprentice to leeward, pitching us off the windward cockpit bench. We landed in the lee side of the cockpit but a more violent impact might have pitched us over the side, leaving us dangling from our tethers. There have been many man overboard incidents in which people have been flung or washed out of cockpits and I suspect that crew are more at risk in the cockpit than on deck – as they are less likely to be gripping a secure handhold. Therefore, harness clip on points in the cockpit should be positioned to minimise the length of safety lanyard that can extend beyond the lifelines. That means putting them low down and near the centreline, so that crew don’t have to change their clip-on points between tacks.

Harness

A clip-on point that is low and near the centreline minimises the length of safety lanyard that can overhang the lifelines. (Section through cockpit of Sabre 27)

By chance, we had adopted this kind of layout on our own boat. There is a short transverse jackstay against the bridge deck, originally installed for our children, which enables crew to clip on from the companionway before climbing into the cockpit. We also have a separate U-bolt aft of the rudder post, for the helmsman, who changes sides by stepping across the tiller. With our normal lanyards, a short part of their length would fall outside the lifelines (see above). The overhang is undesirable but is short enough to hold a wearer with their head above water and in a position to grab at lifelines etc. Shorter lanyards would keep us within the cockpit but restrict our movements when working around our central mainsheet track to handle winches and sheets.

Harness

The fore-and-aft jackstay on this Sabre 27 permits easy movement along the cockpit without requiring long safety lanyards

Corsair , another Sabre 27, has a different layout with its mainsheet clear of the cockpit well and longitudinal jackstays along each side, which facilitates fore-and-aft movement while wearing short lanyards.

Harness

This new Bavaria has a typical fit-out, with a U-bolt on the steering pedestal as clip on point for the helmsman

At a couple of recent boat shows, many of the brand new yachts seemed to have inadequate provision for clip on points in their cockpits. Typically there was one by the companionway and occasionally one by the wheel, but the sales staff told me that they expected buyers to ask for more if they required them. On the other hand, some boats did display evidence that their designers had already thought about the issue.

jackstays for sailing yachts

Simple but effective: the Cornish Pilot Cutter 30 has U-bolts at the forward end of the cockpit and below the tiller

The Cornish Pilot Cutter 30 had a traditional cockpit with a small well and a basic but entirely adequate arrangement of anchorages: one U-bolt on each side of the well, near the hatch, and a third U-bolt for the helmsman, below the tiller. I was also impressed by the Pogo 1250, which has a wide stern and twin wheels but a transverse jackstay that allows the helmsman to move across the full width while wearing a short tether.

Harness

I was impressed by this transverse jackstay between the twin wheels for the helmsman on this Pogo 1250

Older yachts may be less well equipped and during the summer I undertook an informal survey by strolling around marina pontoons in various harbours. There were many examples of well-regarded cruising designs, with sailing gear and other equipment that was apparently destined for blue water voyaging, but with no clip on points whatsoever in their cockpits. On reflection, I have the impression that books, magazine articles and website forums have been inclined to concentrate on deck jackstays while overlooking cockpit security, which may actually be more important.

Of course, there is much more to consider. To counter the risk of crew being flung across the boat, why not install additional grab handles? If they help to avoid injuries, then they act as safety equipment and should reduce reliance on emergency measures such as the first aid kit.

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Backstays to the Future

  • By Alvah Simon
  • Updated: March 28, 2013

jackstays for sailing yachts

backstay setup

A running backstay is a removable stay that provides aft support to the mast from either the masthead or the point at which an inner forestay is attached. It originated as a response to the material limits of the period. At that time, solid wooden masts, for example, were either too weak or too heavy to be made particularly tall. Therefore, to achieve an acceptable area of sail for the heavy-displacement boats of the day, either the boom had to be extended beyond the transom or a gaff had to be added to the top of the sail—or both. This precluded the use of fixed backstays because the boom and gaffs had to be free to swing across the vessel when it tacked and jibed. As a tack or jibe was initiated, the burdened backstay had to be released and, as the spars swung through, the new, now windward, stay had to be fastened quickly before the entire rig came tumbling down.

With the advent of hollow masts, first of wood and then of alloy, and stainless-steel wire, the aspect ratio of the rigs began to extend to 3-to-1 and beyond. This allowed for the development of the Bermuda or Marconi rig, which eliminated gaffs and shortened the booms considerably without the loss of sail area or performance.

Running backstays, or runners, were then generally found only on cutter-rigged vessels. But through the 1960s and 1970s, the sloop became the rig du jour, and running backstays fell from favor. With the introduction of Freedom Yachts’ freestanding mast and Hunter’s B&R rig, the trend veered toward eliminating backstays, running or not, altogether.

Where are we today? Are running backstays now simply anachronisms that add unnecessary weight, windage, and clutter? I think not, especially in the context of bluewater cruising.

Sloops are fast around the buoys, but in the open sea, they display two disadvantages. First, the sail area is shared by only two large and therefore more difficult to handle sails. Second, in storm conditions, a sloop’s headsail, no matter how much it’s furled, still leaves the center of effort too far forward and too high to produce a safe and comfortable motion.

The cutter rig distributes the sail area over an additional sail, and that inner forestay is a superior position from which to hank on a low-flown storm sail. But with any real force upon it, the inner forestay can distort the shape of the mast; this will require a countereffort. Enter the intermediate running backstay. The arguable benefit of a staysail aside, this lower triangulation of support adds strength and stability to the mast, which translates into a better chance of coming up from a knockdown with the rig intact. Think sailing in the South Atlantic Ocean —it matters.

But alas, when you’re sailing off the wind, these same runners will have to be attended to on each and every tack. In open-ocean situations, this might not happen for days at a time. In confined waters, however, it’s necessary to have a quick and efficient method for setting and stowing runners.

Ideas and hardened opinions on running backstays are diverse and plentiful enough to keep seaside barstools warm all night. See the accompanying images and diagrams to learn about some of the most common approaches to setup and stowage.

If you’re considering adding an inner forestay and running backstays, I recommend that you get professional advice addressing the minimum engineering angles required, appropriate deck hardware, proper tangs and toggles needed at the mast, and wire types and diameters.

I don’t mean to imply that running backstays are suitable for all boats and applications. But if your interests lie in bluewater passagemaking and you take a belt-and-suspenders approach to your safety, I believe that you’ll agree that the added weight, windage, cost, and inconvenience are more than justified.

Alvah Simon, a CW contributing editor, is the author of North to the Night .

Click here for more pictures of running backstay setups . Click here to read about how an inner forestay and staysail can help you beat along in a blow.

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The best way to rig a jackstay

  • Thread starter AB1707
  • Start date 13 Aug 2014
  • 13 Aug 2014

Hi I have jack stays on my boat that are the correct length. I currently have tied them on at both ends using 8mm line, this has 4 lengths and then round turn and two half hitches, which I check regularly. My question is twofold Should I replace a shackle at the bow end? What knot do others use? Thank you for your replies Adam  

PuffTheMagicDragon

PuffTheMagicDragon

Active member.

Sneaky Pete

Sneaky Pete

I have jackstays with a stitched loop at each end. Through this loop is a D shackle attached to the toe rail. Ensure the stitching on the loop end of the jackstay is stitched over a length of about 150mm.  

Sneaky Pete said: I have jackstays with a stitched loop at each end. Through this loop is a D shackle attached to the toe rail. Ensure the stitching on the loop end of the jackstay is stitched over a length of about 150mm . Click to expand...
  • 14 Aug 2014

Well-known member

Mine have sewn loops cow-hitched onto cleats at the bow, and a kind of buckle arrangement at the aft end, secured with a shackle. They're not particularly tight - they were fitted in a hurry at the start of a trip when I realised we had a rough forecast and the existing inherited jackstays were ancient and sun-bleached, hence the off-the-shelf adjustable buckles rather than being sewn to the correct length. Medium-term I plan to replace them with wires on the cabin top to make it harder to go over the side. Anyway, getting back to lashings (which are perfectly acceptable IMO), when I sailed on Stavros the rule for anything up in the rig that held people's weight (footropes, cranelines, etc) was "at least four turns, at least four half-hitches, and at least four tucks through the lay of the rope". This was with polyester three-strand, from memory probably about 8mm. Pete  

4 turns of an 8mm line will be very strong. Just keep an beye out for damage in the sun. But then the actual jackstays need to checked for sun damage too. What is more important is to place the jackstays and the harness tether such that the crew can not go over the side. This might mean jackstay down the middle of the foredeck or of using the jack stay on the opposite side to waves etc. good luck olewill  

Graham_Wright

prv said: Medium-term I plan to replace them with wires on the cabin top to make it harder to go over the side. Click to expand...

snooks

I replaced mine with wire, lashed at each end with Dyneema, and the hitches covered in self amalgamating tape. The jackstays sit nice and flush against the corner of the deck/coachroof, only on the foredeck is it possible to step on them. But my feet are big enough and the wire thin enough that if I do stand on them there is enough of my decks shoe in contact with the deck that my foot stays where it is. I now just leave them on all the time, rather than take them off when not on board. They cost about £65 to get made up.  

ghostlymoron

ghostlymoron

Graham_Wright said: I thought wires were frowned upon because they roll underfoot? Click to expand...

michael_w

I've got double webbing jackstays secured with sewn loops shackled onto different slots in the toerail. The leashes are attached via a large bow shackle. Quick and easy to rig and strike, so when not needed, ie: local fair weather sailing, they live out of the sun below. Also, they are not very tight. The potential loads on the jackstay rise quite dramatically the tighter they are. Ideally I'd lead them down the centreline, but pesky fittings, like the spray hood and mainsheet get in the way.  

Our jackstays had loops at both ends which I tied to the fore and aft cleats using a bowline to tie off .  

ghostlymoron said: They do. I wouldn't use them. If you secure the ends with a double overhand knot to a cleat base you don't need made to measure ones. Or a sewn loop/cowhitch at one end. The knot doesn't reduce strength to an unacceptable figure I've read. Click to expand...

johnalison

It partly depends on the boat. Our old Sadler 29 had wire, which caused a lot of trouble to rafters crossing in the dark, though I never achieved a broken limb. I currently have webbing with rings sewn to the ends, lashed to fixings on the toerail. More of a problem is finding the right path to allow easy access to the foredeck. I have settled for a line outside the rigging but a friend with a different model has a better line inside the cap shrouds.  

snooks said: I replaced mine with wire, lashed at each end with Dyneema, and the hitches covered in self amalgamating tape. The jackstays sit nice and flush against the corner of the deck/coachroof, only on the foredeck is it possible to step on them. But my feet are big enough and the wire thin enough that if I do stand on them there is enough of my decks shoe in contact with the deck that my foot stays where it is. I now just leave them on all the time, rather than take them off when not on board. They cost about £65 to get made up. Click to expand...

estarzinger

AB1707 said: Hi jack stays . . . . have tied them on at both ends using 8mm line, this has 4 lengths and then round turn and two half hitches. Should I replace a shackle at the bow end? Your lashings are strong enough. No reason to replace them with shackles unless you want to. What knot do others use? a bowline or a buntline hitch are most common for terminating a lashing. But your round turn and two half hitch is satisfactory. Adam Click to expand...
Sneaky Pete said: Ensure the stitching on the loop end of the jackstay is stitched over a length of about 150mm. It turns out to be quite difficult to sew a full strength (to ISAF specification) loop in webbing. The difficulty is that the stitching is not all evenly loaded - it is highly loaded away from the loop where you have a two ply to one ply webbing transition and less loaded near the loop where you have two plys of webbing sharing the load. The net is that the key is to get a lot of stitching strength within the first 50mm, NOT to have a long amount of stitching (which will just progressively peel up as the load is transferred to it). I have done a lot of testing on this, which you can see at http://www.bethandevans.com/load.htm if you are interested. Click to expand...

Phoenix of Hamble

Phoenix of Hamble

michael_w said: Also, they are not very tight. The potential loads on the jackstay rise quite dramatically the tighter they are. Click to expand...
michael_w said: The potential loads on the jackstay rise quite dramatically the tighter they are. Click to expand...
Phoenix of Hamble said: I was intrigued by this comment... intuitively, it would be snatch loads that bothered me, and hence a tight jackstay would be preferable, as a falling body would have less distance to build up momentum... but I'm basing that on nothing other than gut feel, so was keen to understand where your thinking came from? Click to expand...
Giblets said: Out of interest, Graham, did you use plastic covered wire? Click to expand...

blackbeard

On my little boat, the jackstays ran along the side deck, such that, if you slipped, you could go over the side and finish up either being towed alongside the boat, or else suspended below deck level but above the water (depending on whether you went under or over the lifelines). Neither position is ideal, as you probably wouldn't be able to regain the deck. It seems that this arrangement is fairly common. (Yes I know you are supposed to use the windward jackstay, but that doesn't guarantee you will stay on deck.) I have therefore installed a pair of jackstays which run either side of the coachroof, are thus higher up and can be used with a shorter tether, and give a sporting chance that you will still be on deck after your tumble. As for what they are made of, I care not provided they are not rotten. I'm a bit anti shackle on the grounds that a. they will keep off watch crew awake with their rattling against the deck when in use, and b. if a shackle is about to fail or come unscrewed it's less obvious than a lashing about to come undone and c. shackles are moderately pricey if they are the nice ones that come with an indication of safe working load, and if they don't I don't trust them.  

  • 15 Aug 2014

Thank you everyone for all your knowledge and expertise. Safe sailing Adam  

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Keeping safe for ocean cruising – it’s an attitude of mind, says Chris Tibbs

Yachting World

  • August 22, 2016

Chris Tibbs explains that a checklist of required equipment supplied by rallies such as the ARC is only the start for a seamanlike Atlantic passage

jackstays for sailing yachts

Safety is as much a state of mind as it is the equipment we have on board; it does not take us long to identify which is a safely-run yacht on an Atlantic crossing and which is seemingly chaotic.

We are familiar with the slogan ‘useless unless worn’ with regard to lifejackets, but a lifejacket does not make you inherently safe. It does, however, help should you fall over the side, after something else has gone wrong. Modern lifejackets and harnesses are so comfortable it is hard to argue against wearing them, but we should remember that they are a tool of last resort and it is much better not to go over the side in the first place.

It is good seamanship that makes you safe. Look at it a different way – putting a seat belt on in a car does not make you a safe driver, but it will help you survive an accident.

Sailing onboard Taistealai in Grenada and the Grenadines February 2016 Chris and Helen Tibbs Photo Rick Tomlinson

Sailing on board Taistealai in Grenada and the Grenadines February 2016 Chris and Helen Tibbs. Photo Rick Tomlinson

An Atlantic crossing is a big undertaking and, although many yachts do it, this does not make it any the less of an achievement or take away the serious nature of the voyage.

If taking part in the ARC, a race or any rally, you will be issued with a checklist of minimum safety equipment that must be carried. The lists will be similar whatever the event and have grown out of what is prescribed by ISAF special regulations for events of different lengths and distances from help and shelter. Whether you are part of an organised event, or heading off on your own, this list is a good starting point for what is considered necessary and desirable equipment.

It is not complete as new equipment keeps coming onto the market and any committee will take time to react to changes. Moreover, although some new equipment may be very good, it takes a while to become SOLAS approved and until it does it will not replace equipment that is already recognised.

Safety inspection

Bear in mind also that it is a minimum equipment list and many yachts will exceed the minimum particularly in areas of man overboard detection and personal AIS alarms, which are becoming quite common.

The ARC's pre-start safety checklist

The ARC’s pre-start safety checklist

For the past ten years I have been spending a few weeks each year working for the organisers of the ARC, mainly lecturing, but also working as one of their safety inspectors. Last year I was wearing two hats, being an organiser and a participant, which also got me thinking about safety, not only to comply with the rules, but also what additional equipment I would like on our own boat.

Doing safety checks for the ARC has been quite an eye-opener; some crews feel that a safety check is just a tick list to be passed and will try to argue black is white to avoid having the correct gear. Others will use the knowledge of the inspectors – usually people with a wide range of experience – to gain a better understanding of why certain equipment is required and the best use of it.

Liferafts are an interesting case: regulations are quite clear, but each year we still get boats arriving in the Canaries with an inshore liferaft to cross an ocean because ‘somebody’ (usually the seller) tells them it will comply. It is always a difficult job having to tell a participant that their liferaft is not up to the job and they will have to buy a new one. ( See our feature on liferafts here ).

Liferafts need to be ISO 9650 for greater than 24 hours or SOLAS, which when you think about it is sensible for ocean crossing away from land and the chance of helicopter rescue. EPIRBs, satphones and trackers have hopefully made those long liferaft survival stories a thing of the past, but it is a big ocean and should you need to take to a liferaft, rescue could well be a few days away. In the Pacific you need to be even more self-sufficient.

The right liferaft

It may come as a surprise – and it did to me – that liferafts rated for less than 24 hours may not carry any water at all and rarely have food. The safety pack is limited and most manufacturers make the safety equipment pack up to greater than 24 hours (the requirement) by adding a grab bag, which should be kept with/close to the liferaft.

greater than 24 hour pack

A SOLAS liferaft pack for more than 24 hours will carry water and food

I am not a great fan of this so when purchasing a liferaft for our crossing we specified that the full pack had to be within the liferaft; taking to a liferaft is going to be a traumatic experience, and may happen very quickly, without having to remember extra grab bags (see what to keep in your grab bag here ).

Most yachts will need at least one grab bag anyway, with EPIRB, boat papers, medicines, money, etc, so to have extra grab bags makes the chance of leaving one behind much greater. If you talk to liferaft manufacturers and suppliers, you should be able to get a liferaft with everything included. It does make them bigger and heavier, but it reduces what you need to remember in an emergency. Ours was supplied by Ocean Safety.

_40A9358

I think that many people (men particularly) have a dislike of crotch straps – the thought probably more than the reality. I was pretty much of the same opinion until a safety brief ahead of a Sydney Hobart race where we were told how much greater our chance of survival was with crotch straps. If not convinced, try a lifejacket in the water without crotch straps and see how quickly it rides up and has you falling out of the bottom.

Lifejackets and harnesses need strong points and jackstays to attach to; it is much easier to keep crew on board than to pluck them out of the water. Webbing jackstays, however, will degrade in the sunlight and it is worth checking and replacing these when necessary.

On our boat we will always take the jackstays off in harbour, putting them back on again before a passage. This reduces their exposure to UV light as well as the dirt and dust of harbours, therefore lengthening their useful life.

Safety equipment poorly sited

Although most yachts have reasonable man overboard equipment aboard – dan buoy, horseshoe lifering, etc – it is disappointing that it is often poorly sited and the relevant pieces are not connected together. The horseshoe and dan buoy need to be together – if you were in the water and they are not connected, where would you swim? To the dan buoy that the yacht can see, or to the horseshoe which will keep you afloat?

ARC_05_0698

When sailing two-handed I feel that trying to stop the boat alongside a person then helping them on board is too difficult; being able to circle the person should be possible then, by slipping the sling on, they are attached to the boat. A halyard or handy billy from the boom end can then be used to recover them. Crew numbers and how it will be used are important considerations.

5 top tips for safety equipment

Know what you need and check what you are buying complies with event regulations., read the instructions as they are not always obvious., use the knowledge of the event safety inspectors to understand better how to use the equipment and what it is for., it is not a test – what is on the list is sensible, and a safety check/inspection can be a time to get things right and hopefully most participants will see this as an opportunity to do so. it also focuses your attention on safety – even if you have all the correct equipment it is a time to make sure it is properly serviced and working correctly., at the end of the day it is you who is crossing the ocean, not the safety inspector or chandlery that sold you the equipment..

The list of what is checked on any race or rally is fairly comprehensive and the list of requirements is known by competitors well ahead of the event. To get to the Canary Islands yachts will have sailed a long distance through potentially rough conditions and it does not make any sense to leave safety requirements to the last minute and buy equipment when you get there.

There will be bits and pieces to update, but for most crews the roughest weather of the crossing is before the Canary Islands so why wait to equip your yacht?

Equipment requirement makes sense, although there has to be some flexibility between types of yachts as monohull and multihull requirements differ in some aspects – for example lanyards on washboards do not make much sense on a cat with sliding patio doors. The safety gear list is just a starting point and is not an onerous list as most things should already be on board.

Good seamanship

Once all the gear is aboard, it is worth remembering that it is not the gear that will keep you safe, it is seamanship, experience and common sense backed up with the correct tools. Have a look also at your boat as boatbuilders do not necessarily cross oceans and many yachts seem only intended for travel from marina to marina.

It makes sense to carry some water bottles

It makes sense to carry some water bottles

It is preferable to have multiple water tanks that can be isolated from each other. That way if there is a leak or contamination in one tank, the whole of your supply is not lost. During the last ARC, one yacht had a watermaker failure and salt water was pumped into their only tank. Ample spare water was carried on board in bottles for such an eventuality so it was not a big problem.

Bilge pumps are usually on the small side. There is a rally requirement for a manual outside bilge pump, which not all boats are equipped with. Racing regs usually go further and require two manual bilge pumps. Having seen the pictures from Magritte – the yacht that sank in the last ARC (see the story here ) – I think we need to review our own bilge pump capacity.

Taking on water

And on the subject of bilge pumps, we had an interesting occurrence in the ARC. We are usually a very dry boat; with a saildrive rather than a shaft our bilges usually have only a very small amount of water from spray or spillage in the galley. Rolling down the trades we found that we were taking on water.

It became apparent that the bilge pump was the culprit as the rolling forced water back into the bilge through the pump. There is a one-way valve in the strum box, but the water was leaking into the boat through the quick connectors on the pump itself. There is no seacock on the pipe where it goes through the hull as it is normally above the waterline so we need a rethink on this before taking on the Pacific.

_40A9446

One thing I always check is the cooker gimbals as one time on a North Atlantic crossing early in the season we were rolled by a large cross sea. The cooker leapt out of its gimbals and was dangling by the rubber gas pipe, which thankfully held. We got the cooker back in place, but the thought of the damage that could have been done is frightening. Most battery banks are well secured, but additional heavy items are often left free to fly around.

A huge range of yachts cross the Atlantic mostly without any major problems, however there are always stories about when things do go wrong. The sea and the weather seem to have an uncanny way of finding weaknesses that can cascade into a major problem. Carrying adequate safety equipment is your insurance policy – there if you need it, but hopefully you won’t. The greatest safety is good seamanship and shipboard practices.

While the emphasis is on the required equipment, it is easy to forget that the way you run the boat is paramount to everyone’s safety. Accidents will happen, but the way you sail and set up your yacht can help minimise these.

A successful passage is largely owing to the preparation of yacht and crew. Each year I see well prepared yachts sail through their safety inspection and have a fabulous crossing.

Extra safety gear carried on Taistealai

Although not a requirement we added a few extra items:

  • LED flares in the grab bag – although these have to be additional to the required pyrotechnics they seem a good idea, particularly if in a rubber raft.
  • AIS man overboard beacons.
  • Spare steering cables.
  • Spare rigging connections.
  • A gas solenoid was fitted so the gas can be turned off from inside when not in use. These are not universally accepted as there could be a small risk of mixing electricity and gas.

Chris Tibbs,Transatlantic Prep,Plymouth 2,9,15

Chris Tibbs is a meteorologist and weather router, as well as a professional sailor and navigator, forecasting for Olympic teams and the ARC rally. He is currently on his own circumnavigation with his wife, Helen. His series of Weather Briefings can be seen here

Chris Tibbs prepares his own boat for an Atlantic crossing

The best route for an Atlantic crossing

Taking the northerly route across the Atlantic

Offshore weather planning: options for receiving weather data at sea

as well as Chris Tibbs’s series of Weather Briefings

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How To Fit Jackstays?

jackstays for sailing yachts

  • Add to quote

jackstays for sailing yachts

When I fit jacklines on Mandolin, I run jacklines made of flat webbing down both starboard and port deck walkways. I cleat it at the forward cleat and stretch it to a cleat towards the middle or back of the cockpit. That way I can clip on while in the cockpit, climb out and walk anywhere forward without removing the tether. I would think that a centerline jackline would cause too many snags. Tod  

Gladrags1 said: When I fit jacklines on Mandolin, I run jacklines made of flat webbing down both starboard and port deck walkways. I cleat it at the forward cleat and stretch it to a cleat towards the middle or back of the cockpit. That way I can clip on while in the cockpit, climb out and walk anywhere forward without removing the tether. I would think that a centerline jackline would cause too many snags. Tod Click to expand...

Alot depends upon the setup of your individual boat. My setup works for me as if I am going forward, I would be going on the high side. If I fell, my jackline would be farther away from the leeward jacklines than one centerline. My feeling is that you want to keep the jackline as clear as possible so the tether runs freely and you want to reduce the number of places where you have to unclip and move to a different jackline to continue your movement forward. Additionally, you want to keep your personal center of gravity low to the boat so you don't want to be stretching out to clip on to a jackline far away. Unclipping to clip on to the mast to do some extended work there makes sense as well if needed. By spearguns, are you talking about windshield? I would keep the jacklines low and close to the cockpit so you can clip on easily without stretching, keeping your personal center of gravity low to the boat.  

I have recently acquired a 29 foot Sadler with a sprayhood and wire jackstays along the side decks. There are no adequate handholds when leaving the cockpit. The existing jackstays would not keep me on the boat and so I am looking at trying to construct a central jackstay. The sprayhood is an obstacle to a central jackstay. I can imagine 2 solutions. The first and cheapest would be to create a strong point just aft of the mast and to run a wire jackstay from the strong point to a floating steel ring on the backstay about 6 feet above the pushpit. As the backstay is centrally located, the jackstay would be central and would clear the sprayhood. I could then clip on in the cockpit. The drawback is potential damage to the backstay from the steel ring. The second solution requires the strong point aft of the mast and a steel gantry over the sprayhood. This gantry would take the shape of a roll bar and would be used for handholds when leaving the cockpit instead of the sprayhood! The jackstay would be connected between the strongpoint and the gantry once again permitting clipping on when leaving the cockpit. Any drawbacks or comments?  

jackstays for sailing yachts

I have always thought that jackstays would be safer if located on or close to the center line. Something I read somewhere (can’t remember where) recommended leaving a tether attached to the jackstay and run back to the cockpit. Thus you could clip onto that tether and then unclip your cockpit tether before leaving the cockpit. Of course it would depend on the layout of your boat but I thought that jackstays in a shallow V with a tether on each and clipped to something within easy reach from the cockpit would be the way to go. ‘Haven’t got round to trying it yet.  

Brion Toss discusses jacklines at length in his 'riggers apprentice' and is worth reading before drilling holes in your boat...  

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Sip n’ Sail boat cruises from Mackinac Island feature live music, special summer events

  • Published: May. 22, 2024, 7:32 a.m.

jackstays for sailing yachts

MACKINAC ISLAND, MI - Sometimes to cap off a really great vacation, you just need to take a little cruise.

Sip n’ Sail boat tours have been offering this as something special for Mackinac Island visitors for years, and this season the team is back on the water with two boats and a schedule packed full of extras.

Live music, sunset cruises, history-themed trips all rub shoulders on the summer events calendar with Michigan craft beer cruises, Bloody Mary and Mimosa sails, and the ever-popular Easy Like Sunday Morning trips that just seem to put an exclamation point on an island weekend.

Why do visitors and locals alike love these daily cruises so much? It’s the unique perspective they offer.

“It’s viewing the island from the water,” co-owner Veronica Dobrowolski told MLive in an earlier interview.

After guests step aboard one of the two Sip n’ Sail boats, they get an eyeful of landmarks like Mackinac’s famous Grand Hotel and its multi-million-dollar West Bluff homes as they motor out of the harbor.

On some excursions, the cruise boats pass freighters in the Straits of Mackinac. They see ferry boats shuttling passengers to and from the island. Some of the trips even head underneath the Mackinac Bridge for a look at the engineering marvel from below.

You can see a complete list of cruises and the 2024 special events schedule on the Sip n’ Sail website. Tickets can be purchased in advance online. Private charters can also be arranged.

Sip n' Sail Sunset Cruise from Mackinac Island

A cocktail aboard the Sip n' Sail Sunset Cruise from Mackinac Island on Tuesday, May 23, 2023 (Lori Chapman | MLive.com)

Sip n’ Sail cruises already have started for the season on the company’s main boat, the 81-foot Isle Royale Queen III . Its upper deck has comfortable chairs at the stern and high-top tables, while the middle is set up more like an outdoor patio, with area rugs, cushioned seats and low tables - a perfect space to gather and talk while staff members take drink orders and get everyone situated for the cruise.

An area is set up for live music on the upper deck. The boat has a rotating list of local musicians on the schedule, all with a good following.

The Queen III also has two indoor heated cabins on the main level, with plenty of window-side tables for relaxing and sightseeing.

Also taking out passengers this year is the 55-foot Robin E , which is a glass-bottomed boat that used to run passengers on tours near Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.

Mackinac Island Sip n’ Sail Cruise

The Isle Royale Queen III set offs from Mackinac Island during a Sip n' Sail Sunset Cruise on Tuesday, May 23, 2023. The cruise goes under the Mackinac Bridge before returning to the island. Neil Blake | MLive.com

Isle Royale Queen III was a full-circle moment for Sip n’ Sail

Guests who step aboard the Queen are sailing on a cool piece of Michigan’s maritime history.

The Isle Royale Queen III has been riding three of the Great Lakes since 1960, and started out a bit smaller than her current length - and with a slightly different name.

In the late 1950s, Ward Grosnik of Copper Harbor contracted with the T.D. Vinette Boat Company in Escanaba to build the Isle Royale Queen II. He wanted a big ferry boat that could carry passengers across Lake Superior to Isle Royale National Park, a remote island that is Michigan’s northernmost point.

The 57-foot Isle Royale Queen II went into service in 1960. It could carry 57 people, and a couple tons of cargo - usually canoes, camping gear and other provisions for adventurers set to explore the rocky island known for its wilderness hiking.

Sip n' Sail Sunset Cruise from Mackinac Island

Passengers on the Sip n' Sail Sunset Cruise from Mackinac Island on Tuesday, May 23, 2023 (Lori Chapman | MLive.com)

In 1971, the ferry business was sold to Donald Kilpela Sr. When he could not find a new passenger ship, he hired naval architect Timothy Graul, from Sturgeon Bay, Wis., to lengthen the Queen II. Vinette Boat Company was tapped again to handle the expansion. When she was finished, the 81-foot-long boat could carry 100 passengers and cut through the water at a faster, smoother clip.

In 1989, the improved ship was renamed the Isle Royale Queen III. She did trips out of Copper Harbor until 2004, when she was replaced by a larger ferry. The Queen III then was used to carry passengers on Lake Michigan between Menominee, Mi., and Wisconsin’s Door Peninsula for the next several years.

In 2010, the Queen III’s cabins and upper deck were refurbished so passengers could enjoy the scenery topside. Her home ports after that were Marquette and, most recently, Mackinac Island.

Fast-forward to the Queen’s Sip n’ Sail era: Dobrowolski is also CEO and co-owner of Arnold Freight, which ferries much of the island’s cargo and supplies over from the mainland. She was friends with Sip n’ Sail’s former owners and already was familiar with the Queen III. Dobrowolski said she’d first seen the boat on a trip to Isle Royale in 1993. She had just earned her captain’s license and, to celebrate, she and some friends had planned a camping and hiking trip to this U.P. spot known for its wolves and moose. They traveled to Isle Royale on the Queen III.

Now that it is tied up at her Arnold Freight dock, this floating piece of Michigan maritime history is a full-circle move.

“It’s the best on-water experience to see the island in a different way,” she told MLive.

Love Mackinac Island as much as we do? Here are more interesting stories:

What’s new on Mackinac Island: Stonecliffe to reopen, new nature center near Arch Rock and more

Fairy Arch, the Musical Well: Fascinating forgotten spots on Mackinac Island

How a Mackinac Island mansion’s playhouse became Grand Hotel’s fine dining showpiece

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Orcas sink sailing yacht in Strait of Gibraltar

An unknown number of orcas have sunk a sailing yacht after ramming it in Moroccan waters in the Strait of Gibraltar, Spain’s maritime rescue service said on Monday, a new attack in what has become a trend in the past four years.

The vessel Alboran Cognac, which measured 15 metres (49 feet) in length and carried two people, encountered the highly social apex predators, also known as killer whales, at 9 a.m. local time (0700 GMT) on Sunday, the service said.

The passengers reported feeling sudden blows to the hull and rudder before water started seeping into the ship. After alerting the rescue services, a nearby oil tanker took them onboard and transported them to Gibraltar.

The yacht was left adrift and eventually sank.

The incident is the latest example of  recurring orca rammings  around the Gibraltar Strait that separates Europe from Africa and off the Atlantic coast of Portugal and northwestern Spain.

Experts believe them to involve a subpopulation of about 15 individuals given the designation “Gladis.”

According to the research group GTOA, which tracks populations of the Iberian orca sub-species, there have been nearly 700 interactions since orca attacks on ships in the region were first reported in May 2020.

Researchers are unsure about the causes for the behaviour, with leading theories including it being a playful manifestation of the mammals’ curiosity, a social fad or the intentional targeting of what they perceive as competitors for their favourite prey, the local bluefin tuna.

Although known as killer whales, endangered orcas are part of the dolphin family. They can measure up to eight metres and weigh up to six tonnes as adults.

jackstays for sailing yachts

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Orcas Sink Another Boat Near Iberia, Worrying Sailors Before Summer

Two people were rescued on Sunday after orcas damaged their boat near the Strait of Gibraltar, where the animals have caused havoc in recent years.

Two orcas are visible just above the surface of a body of water, with a small boat in the background.

By Isabella Kwai

Summer is on the way, meaning that the orcas are out to play near the Strait of Gibraltar — which is bad news for sailors.

Two people were rescued on Sunday after an attack by a group of orcas caused enough damage to sink their boat, according to the Spanish maritime rescue service. It was the fifth such sinking in waters off the Iberian Peninsula and North Africa in recent years.

The Alboran Cognac, a sailing yacht about 50 feet long, was approached by the animals on Sunday morning, some 14 miles off Cape Spartel in Morocco, the rescue service said. Crew members onboard reported that the animals had slammed the hull, damaged the rudder and caused a leak.

A nearby oil tanker quickly maneuvered toward the boat and evacuated the two sailors, who were taken to Gibraltar, the rescue service said. The boat was left adrift, and the Moroccan authorities reported that it eventually sank.

It’s the first boat to sink in those waters this year after an orca-related mishap. A group of orcas that traverse the Strait of Gibraltar and nearby waters has plagued sailors and intrigued marine biologists , who are studying the population. Since 2020, orcas have disrupted dozens of sailing journeys in these high-traffic waters, in some cases slamming vessels hard enough to cause critical damage.

Last November, orcas slammed a yacht’s rudder for 45 minutes, causing its crew to abandon the vessel, which sank near the Tanger Med port.

The group is more likely to appear in the busy lanes around the Gulf of Cadiz and the Strait of Gibraltar between April and August, the Spanish government said in a news release, and sailors have spotted some of the orcas there in recent weeks.

Researchers do not know why the pod is targeting boats, but they have theorized that the behavior is a form of play for the curious apex predators. The interactions have become so frequent that they are now a multinational issue, involving scientists and officials from Spain, Portugal and Morocco. Online, anxious sailors have gathered to share advice on navigating “orca alley,” and biologists are tracking the orcas’ movements and testing methods that could deter them.

In the event of an orca encounter, the government advised in its release, boats should not stop but instead head toward shallower waters near the coast.

But the number of incidents may be declining: Researchers at the Atlantic Orca Working Group said on Monday that the number of orca interactions with boats between January and May had dropped some 40 percent, compared with that of similar periods in the past three years.

Isabella Kwai is a Times reporter based in London, covering breaking news and other trends. More about Isabella Kwai

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Killer whales attack and sink sailing yacht in the Strait of Gibraltar — again

By Emily Mae Czachor

Updated on: May 14, 2024 / 4:54 PM EDT / CBS News

A sailing yacht sunk in the Strait of Gibraltar on Sunday after an unknown number of orcas  slammed into the vessel with two people on board and caused a water leak, officials said. Both crew members were rescued by a passing oil tanker, said Spain's maritime rescue service, marking the latest killer whale attack on a boat in what has become a pattern in recent years.

The incident happened at around 9 a.m. local time in the narrow strait between Spain and Morocco that has become a notorious site of human interactions with pods of killer whales that, for reasons still not fully understood, ram into boats and at times even sink them . In this case, crew members on board the SV Alboran Cognac yacht put out an emergency call for an evacuation after they encountered orcas roughly 14 miles off the coast of Cape Spartel. 

The crew members reported feeling blows to the hull of the vessel and rudder, which was damaged by the whales, the rescue service said. The agency's coordination center in Tarifa, on the Spanish side of the Strait of Gibraltar, helped arrange for their evacuation via the tanker MT Lascaux. The tanker was able to collect the crew members from the sinking yacht within the hour, and they disembarked in Gibraltar before 10:30 a.m. They abandoned the SV Alboran Cognac, which proceeded to completely disappear into the ocean.

Anyone sailing through waters from the Gulf of Cádiz in southern Spain and the Strait of Gibraltar, either in a larger motorized vessel or a personal sailing boat, is advised to avoid certain areas that the maritime rescue service marks as potentially dangerous spots for orca interactions. The greatest threats exist between May and August, when officials say that pods of killer whales are most commonly seen in those parts of the Atlantic. 

orca-interactions-maritime-rescue.jpg

But previously recorded incidents suggest those dangers may be present at any time. Last October, a Polish boat touring company reported that a pod of orcas had managed to sink one of its yachts after repeatedly slamming into the steering fin for 45 minutes, causing it to leak. Last June, two sailing teams competing in an international race around the world reported frightening scenarios in which multiple orcas rammed into or pushed up against their boats or as they sailed west of Gibraltar. 

No one on board any of the vessels was hurt in those encounters, but the documented rise in confrontational behavior has researchers and sailors trying to determine why orcase have attempted to sink or capsize so many boats off the coasts of Spain and Portugal. 

Some sailors have even resorted to blasting thrash metal music in a bid to deter the apex predators.

Reports of orcas interacting with humans have more than tripled in the last two years or so, according to the research group GTOA, which has documented hundreds of such incidents in the region since 2020. But some of the latest data points to possible changes in the orcas' etiquette, with the group reporting only 26 interactions in the Strait of Gibraltar and Bay of Biscay areas between January and May of this year. That number is 65% lower than the number of interactions recorded in the region over the same months last year, and 40% lower than the average number of interactions recorded in the same months between 2021 and 2023, according to GTOA.

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Emily Mae Czachor is a reporter and news editor at CBSNews.com. She covers breaking news, often focusing on crime and extreme weather. Emily Mae has previously written for outlets including the Los Angeles Times, BuzzFeed and Newsweek.

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Filipino activists decide not to sail closer to disputed shoal, avoiding clash with Chinese ships

More than 100 Filipino activists on wooden boats have decided not to sail closer to a fiercely disputed shoal in the South China Sea to avoid a confrontation with dozens of Chinese coast guard and suspected militia ships guarding the area

MANILA, Philippines — About 100 Filipino activists on wooden boats have decided not to sail closer to a fiercely disputed shoal in the South China Sea on Thursday to avoid a confrontation with dozens of Chinese coast guard and suspected militia ships guarding the area.

Accompanied by journalists on four boats, the activists will distribute food packs and fuel to Filipino fishermen about 58 nautical miles (107 kilometers) southeast of Scarborough Shoal and then sail back home, Emman Hizon and other organizers said.

Chinese and Philippine coast guard and accompanying ships have had a series of increasingly hostile territorial faceoffs at Scarborough, which is surrounded by the Chinese coast guard, and at Philippine-occupied Second Thomas Shoal since last year. The Chinese ships have used powerful water cannons and employed blocking and other dangerous maneuvers that led to minor collisions, injured several Filipino navy personnel and strained diplomatic ties.

The United States has repeatedly warned that it’s obligated to defend the Philippines , its longtime treaty ally, if Filipino forces, ships or aircraft come under an armed attack in the region, including in the busy South China Sea. That has sparked fears a conflict could involve Washington if the territorial disputes escalate out of control.

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The activists and fishing community leaders, who belong to a nongovernment coalition called Atin Ito, Tagalog for This is Ours, provided aid to Filipino fishermen and floated symbolic territorial buoys on Wednesday on their way to Scarborough’s outlying waters to assert Philippine sovereign rights over the atoll. But two Chinese coast guard ships started shadowing them Wednesday night, according to Hizon and the Philippine coast guard.

A group of 10 activists managed to evade the Chinese blockade by at least 46 ships in the outlying waters on Wednesday and distributed food and fuel to Filipinos fishing closer to the atoll. That was cited by the activists in declaring that their mission was a success.

“We managed to breach their illegal blockade, reaching the vicinity of Bajo de Masinloc to support our fishers with essential supplies,” said Rafaela David, an activist leader who led the voyage to the disputed waters. “Mission accomplished.”

The Philippine coast guard deployed three patrol ships and a light plane on Wednesday to keep watch on the activists, who set off from western Zambales province. Dozens of journalists joined the three-day voyage.

In December, the group mounted an expedition to another disputed shoal but cut the trip short after being tailed by a Chinese ship.

China effectively seized Scarborough Shoal, a triangle-shaped atoll with a vast fishing lagoon ringed by mostly submerged coral outcrops, by surrounding it with its coast guard ships after a tense 2012 standoff with Philippine government ships.

Angered by China’s action, the Philippine government brought the territorial disputes to international arbitration in 2013 and largely won, with a tribunal in The Hague ruling three years later that China’s expansive claims based on historical grounds in the busy seaway were invalid under the 1982 U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea.

The ruling declared Scarborough Shoal a traditional fishing area for Chinese, Filipino and Vietnamese fishermen, but China refused to join the arbitration, rejected the ruling and continues to defy it.

Two weeks ago, Chinese coast guard and suspected militia ships used water cannons on Philippine coast guard and fisheries ships patrolling Scarborough Shoal, damaging both ships.

The Philippines condemned the Chinese coast guard’s action at the shoal, which lies in Manila’s internationally recognized exclusive economic zone. The Chinese coast guard said it took a “necessary measure” after the Philippine ships “violated China’s sovereignty.”

Aside from the Philippines and China, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan have also been involved in the long-seething territorial disputes .

Indonesia has also had skirmishes with Chinese vessels in resource-rich waters stretching from its Natuna islands to the margins of the South China Sea, which Beijing has claimed virtually in its entirety.

The Indonesian navy has fired warning shots in the past and seized Chinese fishing boats it accused of encroaching into Indonesian waters.

jackstays for sailing yachts

IMAGES

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    jackstays for sailing yachts

  2. Offshore sailing basic equipment: Jackstay

    jackstays for sailing yachts

  3. How To Install Lazy Jacks in 2020

    jackstays for sailing yachts

  4. How to stay on deck and avoid MOB

    jackstays for sailing yachts

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    jackstays for sailing yachts

  6. Wichard Lyf'Safe Jackstays 55' Jackline [16.5M]

    jackstays for sailing yachts

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COMMENTS

  1. Jackstays and Jacklines- The options for the cruising sailor

    Sail World - The world's largest sailing news network; sail and sailing, cruising, boating news ... Tips on Jackstays (or Jacklines), Clipping Points and Static Safety Lines: ... Completing the race in 20 days after a technical stopover in the Azores to repair her boat On May 19 at 20d 12h 38min, ...

  2. Custom Jackstays and Jacklines

    Jimmy Green webbing jackstays are produced in high tenacity, UK manufacture, 100% polyester webbing. MBL 2000kg, available in Blue, Red, Yellow and Black. MBL 3000kg, available in White. The 25mm webbing will fit comfortably onto the pin of our Extra Wide Stainless Steel Shackles. Dyneema Fibre Jackstay Lines are spliced to length in the Jimmy ...

  3. How to stay on deck and avoid MOB

    You must be able to clip onto the jackstay from the cockpit. The jackstay must run as close to the centreline as possible. It must run the whole length of the deck. It must be as tight as possible. The safest orientation we found was one that can be used on yachts with mainsheet arches towards the back of the cockpit.

  4. Jacklines and jackstays

    Published Date: August 11 2023. Jacklines or jackstays are lines attached to the fore and aft of your boat, allowing your crew to clip on via their safety tether and will prevent 'jolly jack tar' (the old name for a sailor) from falling overboard. These lines are vital in heavy conditions, especially, when you require a crew member to go ...

  5. Jackstays and Jacklines- The options for the cruising sailor

    Sail World - The world's largest sailing news network; sail and sailing, cruising, boating news ... Tips on Jackstays (or Jacklines), Clipping Points and Static Safety Lines: ... It seems that thefts from boats at anchor is an on-going problem in this area, and cruisers should be cautious and lock up when going ashore and at night.

  6. Skippers' Tips: Replacing jack stays & rudder checks

    At sea, especially with bad weather, heavy clothing, working on the fore deck or sailing shorthanded, most of us use weather jackstays and tethers. Only recently I was sailing with a friend of mine and he had rigged jackstays on deck, which I think was a good idea because the ride was quite bumpy and the water temperature was far below summer ...

  7. The Pros and Cons of Chest-high Jacklines

    Cons. Beware of tying into a stern or bow pulpit. The stern pulpits on many cruising boats will fail under less than 1,200 pound loads of load, less than half the minimum advised for jackline padeyes (4,500 pounds). See " USNA Lifeline Test Reveals Weak Spots," PS September 2012 for the full report. If your upper shrouds are located quite a ...

  8. Noonsite.com

    For many sailing enthusiasts, it is the dream of the long days away on the peaceful seas that they look forward to, out on the water and sail with just the elements and the company of trusted family and friends. ... It is good practice to stow webbing jackstays below when the yacht is not at sea to maximise their working life. The Disadvantages ...

  9. Setting Jackstay Tension

    If the mast gives a pulse, then the jackstays are too loose and the mast is going beyond center. This could lead to broken masts. SailZing.com's Rob Hudson de Tarnowsky was lucky to come across this insight being shared at the 2017 ILYA Championship Regatta hosted by the Lake Geneva Yacht Club and Inland Lake Yachting Association.

  10. Wichard LyfSafe Jacklines

    Lyf'Safe can be quickly adjusted and fitted to most boats. Ready-to-use (no need to buy additional shackles etc.) Universal: can be fitted on padeyes, pulpit / pushpit bases, cleats etc. Photo luminescent: can be easily identified when sailing at night; Abrasion Resistant thanks to its two anti-abrasion sides; System components:

  11. How to Use Jacklines for Sailing Safety!

    Captain John with 25+ years of experience shows you the no-nonsense cruising skills you need for safer sailing worldwide. Visit his website at https:--www.sk...

  12. Offshore sailing basic equipment: Jackstay

    The jackstay I bought has a length of 12 metres, that is 3 metres more than my boat is long. The Jackstay comes with metal clamps and can be adjusted to the length desired. There is a heavy loop on one end which can einter be fitted throught the mooring clamp or - as I tried to mock here - through the Dyneema-loop for my removable baby-stay ...

  13. Jackstay

    Jackstays are used in several maritime applications. These include: ... Can refer to a safety line for attaching a safety harness to arrest or prevent a fall, commonly used on sailing yachts, and a requirement on racing yachts, where they are used to reduce the risk of going overboard while working on deck. This line should be properly called a ...

  14. How to Install a Dyneema Sailboat Jackline

    We will show you what a Dyneema jack line is, how it is constructed, and how to install one on your sailboat.

  15. Jackstay and Lifeline Accessories

    Marine Safety Equipment. Jackstays and Jacklines. Jackstay and Lifeline Accessories. Jimmy Green Marine can supply a range of fittings to aid the efficient installation of your jackstay lifelines on deck. e.g. Stainless Steel Rings, Triangles, Extra Wide Shackles, U bolts, Folding Pad Eyes, 3 Bar Slides, Cockpit Safety Anchorage Points. Read More.

  16. International Sailing Federation (ISAF) Guidelines to Jacklines

    Jackstays shall be: 1. Attached to through-bolted or welded deckplates or other suitable and strong anchor points fitted on deck, port and starboard of the boats centerline to provide secure attachments for safety harness; 2. Comprising stainless-steel 1 x 19 wire of minimum diameter 5 millimeters (3/16 inches), high-modulus polyethylene rope ...

  17. Enjoying life in harness

    Enjoying life in harness. The term 'safety equipment' is commonly applied to items that could more accurately be classed as 'emergency equipment', because they are for use in situations that are already unsafe. Flares, personal locator beacons, lifejackets, fire extinguishers, dan buoys and MOB recovery devices only come into their own ...

  18. How to set up running backstays on your sailboat

    Therefore, to achieve an acceptable area of sail for the heavy-displacement boats of the day, either the boom had to be extended beyond the transom or a gaff had to be added to the top of the sail—or both. This precluded the use of fixed backstays because the boom and gaffs had to be free to swing across the vessel when it tacked and jibed.

  19. The best way to rig a jackstay

    Mine have sewn loops cow-hitched onto cleats at the bow, and a kind of buckle arrangement at the aft end, secured with a shackle. They're not particularly tight - they were fitted in a hurry at the start of a trip when I realised we had a rough forecast and the existing inherited jackstays were ancient and sun-bleached, hence the off-the-shelf adjustable buckles rather than being sewn to the ...

  20. Safety Jackstays (Pair)

    Product Description. These jacklines, sometimes called jackstays, will help keep you securely on board without hindering your freedom of movement. Made of 25mm durable, UV-resistant Polyester strap, the 'Life-link' Jacklines feature two loops to attach it to the boat. You are then able to connect safety lines (sold separately) to you and ...

  21. Keep safe for an Atlantic crossing

    On our boat we will always take the jackstays off in harbour, putting them back on again before a passage. ... Accidents will happen, but the way you sail and set up your yacht can help minimise ...

  22. How To Fit Jackstays?

    I have recently acquired a 29 foot Sadler with a sprayhood and wire jackstays along the side decks. There are no adequate handholds when leaving the cockpit. The existing jackstays would not keep me on the boat and so I am looking at trying to construct a central jackstay. The sprayhood is an obstacle to a central jackstay. I can imagine 2 ...

  23. Dyneema for Jacklines / Jackstays?

    One of the big question marks for Dyneema is the very limited energy absorption capacity. No stretch means the forces are higher, and I have published test results that demonstrate that a Dyneema jackline needs to be about 50% stronger than webbing to provide equivalent safety. World Sailing has not investigated this, most likely because there has not been a failure of a Dyneema or webbing ...

  24. Orcas sink sailing yacht in Strait of Gibraltar

    Reuters —. An unknown number of orcas have sunk a sailing yacht after ramming it in Moroccan waters in the Strait of Gibraltar, Spain's maritime rescue service said on Monday, a new attack in ...

  25. Sip n' Sail boat cruises from Mackinac Island feature live music

    Sip n' Sail cruises already have started for the season on the company's main boat, the 81-foot Isle Royale Queen III.Its upper deck has comfortable chairs at the stern and high-top tables ...

  26. Orcas sink sailing yacht in Strait of Gibraltar

    By Reuters. An unknown number of orcas have sunk a sailing yacht after ramming it in Moroccan waters in the Strait of Gibraltar, Spain's maritime rescue service said on Monday, a new attack in ...

  27. Orcas Sink Another Boat Near Iberia, Worrying Sailors Before Summer

    Since 2020, orcas have disrupted dozens of sailing journeys in these high-traffic waters, in some cases slamming vessels hard enough to cause critical damage. Last November, orcas slammed a yacht ...

  28. Killer whales attack and sink sailing yacht in the Strait of Gibraltar

    Updated on: May 14, 2024 / 4:54 PM EDT / CBS News. A sailing yacht sunk in the Strait of Gibraltar on Sunday after an unknown number of orcas slammed into the vessel with two people on board and ...

  29. Orcas sink sailing yacht in Strait of Gibraltar

    An unknown number of orcas have sunk a sailing yacht after ramming it in Moroccan waters in the Strait of Gibraltar, Spain's maritime rescue service said on Monday, a new attack in what has become ...

  30. Filipino activists decide not to sail closer to disputed shoal

    About 100 Filipino activists on wooden boats have decided not to sail closer to a fiercely disputed shoal in the South China Sea on Thursday to avoid a confrontation with dozens of Chinese coast ...