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Nordhavn 86

  • By Mary South
  • Updated: December 2, 2010

This is a love story of sorts, and one with a happy ending, but as Shakespeare said, the course of true love never did run smooth.

Bob Conconi was 32 when he got his first boat, a 28-foot lapstrake mahogany runabout with twin gas Chryslers. His second boat was a 42-foot aluminum trawler. But 10 years ago, Conconi’s third boat was his first Nordhavn , a 62.

He loved his 62 but eventually wanted to move up to a larger boat. So, Conconi’s fourth boat was also a Nordhavn, this time a 76.

The terms of his deal with PAE, Nordhavn’s parent company, included delivery of his new 76 from Dana Point, California, to Vancouver, British Columbia, where Conconi lived with his wife and kids. Nordhavn subbed out the delivery of the 76 to a very experienced former employee, and somewhere, somehow, in the middle of Bodega Bay, California — the exact details are fuzzy, or perhaps Conconi is just too nice to dwell on them — his brand spankin’ new Nordhavn 76 collided with the bow of a freighter. The damage was extensive.

It gets worse. PAE’s insurance didn’t cover the collision damage. Conconi rushed to Bodega Bay, and had his new boat brought in for repairs. And that might have been the sad end of the romance. “Sorry. Not our boat, not our problem.” But Nordhavn wanted to make it right. They worked out a deal in which the 76 was made better than new for another buyer and Conconi moved up to a Nordhavn 86.

It’s a good story, right?

It’s not over yet.

Last year, after the world economic crisis had caused all kinds of deals to collapse, the original agreement on Nordhavn’s first 120, which represented a huge step up and a serious investment for the company, fell to pieces. The buyer backed out and Nordhavn was left all dressed up with no place to go.

Enter Bob Conconi.

“We were at the Ft. Lauderdale show with him,” said Trever Smith, the 120’s project manager, “and trying to it work out.” Conconi had expressed some interest in eventually moving up to a 120, and Nordhavn knew he was a creative guy who was always open to a good deal, so they were trying to talk him into hull number one. “But we were afraid to let him out of our sight [at the show], every other big builder was working hard to sign him, too.”

However, after considering plenty of other yachts, Conconi went with Nordhavn. Again.

“If they say they’ll do something, they do it,” Conconi said.

“They take the time to find out what you’re talking about — they don’t try to find loopholes.”

That had to be a big factor in why Conconi doesn’t have the all-too-common phobia of hull number one. He’s worked his way up through ever larger and more complex models with Nordhavn, learning as he went.

“Often things work perfectly,” Conconi admitted, “it’s just not well documented, but they walk you through it. They’ll send someone or explain the process and everything’s fine.”

Trever Smith commissioned Conconi’s first Nordhavn and has been the project manager on every one of his builds.

“I’d say we have a lot of confidence in each other,” Smith says of his — and Nordhavn’s — relationship with Conconi. “It’s not like a lot of other big companies and their clients.” Smith points out, though, that serial boat monogamy is a common trait amongst Nordhavn owners. Right now, there are more than 20 owners who have had at least one previous Nordhavn, and most of them have had several.

I met Don Kohlmann, Nordhavn’s Northwest sales manager, and Bob Conconi just outside of Vancouver on a crisp early spring day. As my eyes adjusted to the dim light of the boathouse, I was struck by how massive the 86 looked in comparison to other Nordhavns. A long foredeck, 24-foot beam and a displacement of 325,000 pounds make the 86 positively shippy.

Aurora glided silently out of the massive boathouse and up into the still waters of Indian Arm. It was a beautiful day and after we’d been underway for an hour, we saw only an occasional house, surrounded by miles of forest and deep, glacial waters. It was the kind of cruising ground that cries out for a ship, a stout, seaworthy vessel that equals its rugged surroundings. This 86 trawler yacht seemed to fit the bill perfectly.

Nordhavn’s 86 has a full-beam master and three en suite guest staterooms, as well as a captain’s cabin. There are crew quarters aft with head and a laundry/utility room. Aurora’s interior is luxurious, with hardwood moldings and raisedpanel wall joinery, but both Smith and Conconi enthused about the level of finish they’re planning on the 120. This will be Nordhavn’s first foray into the over-100-foot world, and the 120 will reflect that with loose furniture, electric activated doors, and LED lighting throughout.

“We went with Dee Robinson and Destry Darr Designs,” says Conconi, who indicated that his new 120 will take some interior design cues from Lady Michelle , a 161-foot Trinity, also designed by Dee Robinson.

That’s not the only influence Trinity brings to bear on this Nordhavn build. Working with Smith on the project has been Andrew Munn Design, whose owner used to work at Trinity.

“The build process has been going very smoothly,” notes Smith. The hull is finished, the engines are going in, then the tanks, then the soles. “The feeling will be similar in some ways, but this build is two and a half times the cost, twice the weight and twice the volume of the 86,” Smith remarks. “The systems will reflect that. Overhead piping. The engine room isn’t molded, it’s framed, and it has a diamond-plate sole.” Nordhavn is also going “over and above” on sound attenuation, for a whisper-quiet ride.

The 120 is being produced in Nordhavn’s Xiamen, China, yard, where they also build their 40, 42, 43, 52, 55, 60, 63, 75, and a total of seven 86 models so far. When the first 120 is finished, in April 2012, she will be ABS certified and make the 6,500 mile voyage from Xiamen to Vancouver on her own bottom. It’s not bad as shakeout cruises go.

Nordhavn is ready to go on production of the 120. They’ve invested over $2 million in tooling alone and expect future builds to take between 28 to 30 months from start to finish and cost $19 million.

“The N120’s 28-foot beam is close to those of many yachts in the 150- to 160-foot range,” Smith notes, with a similar stateroom layout, albeit smaller in scale. There’s a greater emphasis on outdoor living spaces here then there has been on the smaller Nordhavn builds, as well.

Part of the deal Nordhavn reached with Conconi on the 120 is that this will be a turn-key vessel. When Conconi and his wife Diane take delivery, their yacht will be furnished, decorated and equipped right down to linens on the berths and silverware in the drawers.

It will also include some special modifications. The “Christmas tree” supporting the radar and other equipment will be hydraulically operated to fold down, reducing Conconi’s bridge clearance from 56 feet to 41 feet, so he can continue to use his boathouse, which is something of a hard-to-find treasure in the Vancouver area.

“I’ll be spending most of my time thinking about the electronics outfitting,” Conconi notes, who is choosing all of his bridge gear. “But one call will fix it all,” with Nordhavn providing service for anything he needs. Conconi thinks it’s likely Nordhavn will move to a standardized electronics package on future 120 builds, much the way Westport and some other turn-key builders do.

Conconi jokes that he and Diane have used their 86 for mostly local cruising, “if you call local 2,000 miles of coast from Seattle to Alaska.” Their most memorable trip, he says, was a six-week trip around Vancouver Island. The outside of the island is largely deserted, with about seven out of 10 houses empty now that logging and mining have died out there. “It was absolutely beautiful, though. A whole different part of Canada, and we could have easily spent another month there.”

The Conconi’s new 120 will hold 17,500 gallons of fuel, 2,500 gallons of water and will cruise at 10 knots. Twin MTU Series 2000 M72 engines, with 965 horsepower each at 2,250 rpm, will enable a cruising range of 3,000 nm at reduced speeds.

Looks like the Conconis might have to extend their cruising grounds, but they’re certain to go on enjoying the stunning waters of the Canadian southwest, where they have served as the Swiftsure Race Committee boat for the last three years.

As we came back down the evergreen coast of Indian Arm and past the shoreside residential neighborhood of Deep Cove, I asked Conconi what he liked best about his Nordhavn.

“Piloting it,” he said without hesitation. “I can put it in neutral and coast into the slip just using the bow thruster. Aurora tracks straight and is just a wonderful boat to steer.”

That’s something Smith had mentioned, too. “Bob and Diane love how strong the Nordhavn is. She’s just got a wonderfully heavy, solid feeling when you’re at the helm, unlike some other builds that size.”

“I like Nordhavn because they’re proud, they’re committed to what they do,” Conconi nodded. And he is clearly committed to Nordhavn, too. I’m tempted to say this romance has a happy ending, but I suspect there’s more to come. As long as Nordhavn is making boats, my guess is Conconi will buy them.

LOA: 87’2″ LWL: 77’11” Beam: 24’0″ Draft: 7’4″ Displ.: 299,436 lb. (half load) Fuel: 7,000 gal. Water: 900 gal. Holding: Gray 190 gal., Black 185 gal. Construction: Fiberglass Design: Jeff Leishman Interior: Dee Robinson Naval Architecture: Jeff Leishman Generators: Onan 40 kW, 27.5 kW Stabilizers: Trac 370 Bow Thruster: Hydraulic 50 -hp Watermaker: Village Marine 2,000 gpd Engines: 2 x 600-hp MTU Series 60 model Speed: 12 kts Range: 4,000 nm @ 9 kts Price: $6,750,000

Nordhavn, 949-496-4933; www.nordhavn.com

Click here to read more about Nordhavn yachts.

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Beware When Buying a Boat (or Anything Else)

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OPINION – For many, buying a luxury boat represents the pinnacle of achievement and enjoyment.

Just imagine it. In a nice yacht, you can set out to sea on a beautiful day, kick back, and just drift as you watch the sun playing off of the ocean with nothing around you for miles – and do so in style.

It’s a wonderful daydream. However, for Canadian philanthropist Robert Conconi, it was a dream that turned into a nightmare.

Conconi advanced the company Pacific Asian Enterprises (PAE) the jaw-dropping sum of $16 million in cash and trade-in to construct his dream boat named the Aurora.

After years of work, Conconi hoped it would shine like the northern lights. Instead, the results were simply dark and dirty and appalling. And PAE refused to fix the boat’s many problems.

Multiple inspectors agreed with him, so he took PAE to court in California. Even PAE’s own expert Steve D’Antonio found that the Aurora had 179 deficiencies including important safety items that could blow up, electrocute, burn, or otherwise injure passengers.

The 18-month trial ultimately turned on the question of the seaworthiness of Aurora. Since the boat wouldn’t immediately sink, the court didn’t find for Conconi.

Conconi took his lumps, paid court and other costs, and then spent three years having repairs done to Aurora to make into the vessel that he had actually ordered. Then he found that he couldn’t really enjoy it because of all the bad memories and sold it off instead.

There’s an old Latin warning: caveat emptor. “Let the buyer beware.”

The warning shouldn’t simply be for those who want to buy boats but buyers of every possible good or service. Before you give someone your money, it’s useful to ask some questions and do due diligence. Do a little thinking and a little digging.

Ask yourself, “Why should I trust this seller?” And in different words, ask the seller to make the case for that trust. Then go looking. Did what was said to you check out? What did other customers who’ve done business with this firm have to say? Are there any court cases that should raise red flags?

A lot of this information can be got at with a simple Google search. Deeper digging isn’t much harder and more expensive, with the massive databases and background checks currently available. Or you can do something really radical and talk to people you know and get information that has never been captured digitally.

This warning is even truer when you advance a lot of money to a business or contractor to deliver something to you. The more that you have to lay out up front, the more of your money they can take for granted.

If businesses expect you to lay out most of the capital up front, without any product to show for it, that should make you extra suspicious. What’s the risk of flight or embezzlement or simply shoddy work and then shrugs when you ask for this to be made right?

It’s not fun to think about such things. But if more people thought about it, fewer would get taken. The law can be a remedy sometimes, but only in some. And even then, few people truly end up being made whole.

They lose time, sleep, money, and the sense that the world is as it should be. Don’t let that happen to you.

Alexander Martinez is a former journalist and commentator

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Sunrise Yachts Sponsor 2011 Moscow International Boat Show (MIBS)

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Written by Mike Smith

Sunrise Yachts, a luxury yacht building company which is based in Turkey, has been made a main sponsor of next year’s 2011 Moscow International Boat Show (MIBS). The four-day Russian yacht show event is currently scheduled to run from April 14-17 at the Moscow’s Crocus exhibition centre.

robert conconi yacht

moscow boat show

MIBS is organised by the ITE Group and it is one of Russia’s leading boat shows and is an internationally recognised superyacht event. The show covering everything from small parts and accessories to large superyacht with over 9,000 people and 178 exhibitors attended the last year show.

The Paolo Scanu-designed Sunrise 45 yacht is an ocean-going cruising yacht that was released in 2009 to much acclaim at this was the group’s first-ever model.

Sunrise Yachts was founded in 2007 by the German entrepreneur Herbert P Baum along with the French-British yacht builder Guillaume Roché. The luxury yacht group is based in Antalya, Turkey and utilises a 10,000sq m shipyard facility. Sunrise has two sheds measuring 100m (328ft) x 16m (53ft), as well as a 70m (230ft) x 16m (53ft) fully acclimatized paint shed that can accommodate new-build and refit projects up to 65m (213ft) in length and 1,200 tonnes displacement.

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The sunrise 45m superyacht by Sunrise Yachts

Along each side of the yacht-building facility, space is available for long-term sub-contractors with the latest equipment and logistics capabilities, along with air-conditioned storage, ventilation and extraction plants. The shipyard is organized as an “assembler,” based loosely on the car industry’s model, with a small, yet powerful project management team charged with running all the in-house long-term sub-contractors.

Please contact CharterWorld - the luxury yacht charter specialist - for more on superyacht news item "Sunrise Yachts Sponsor 2011 Moscow International Boat Show (MIBS)".

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Mega yacht IRIMARI cruising along the Turkish coastline

Recently delivered 63m Sunrise Super Yacht IRIMARI to make world premiere at MYS 2015

New Savings and Benefits for Russian Yacht Owners in 2014 announced by Karpaz Gate Marina

New Savings and Benefits for Russian Yacht Owners in 2014 announced by Karpaz Gate Marina

5th Moscow Boat Show, March 20-25, 2012

5th Moscow Boat Show, March 20-25, 2012

5th International exhibition of boats and yachts Moscow Boat Show a Huge Success

5th International exhibition of boats and yachts Moscow Boat Show a Huge Success

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Ground-breaking 52m sportfisher motor yacht PROJECT 406 prepares for launch

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42m luxury explorer yacht KASIF showcases her Hot Lab designed interiors

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32m superyacht BURN RATE available for charter in the Caribbean

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31m luxury yacht MIA ZOI offering 10% discount on charters in Greece

38m superyacht GLORY offering charters around Florida and the glorious Bahamas

38m superyacht GLORY offering charters around Florida and the glorious Bahamas

33m motor yacht O’RIANA is launched by Golden Yachts

33m motor yacht O’RIANA is launched by Golden Yachts

31m luxury yacht MIA ZOI offering 10% discount on charters in Greece

24m motor yacht ANASTASIA V offering fabulous charters in select locations around the Mediterranean

55m superyacht IRIS BLUE - a Heesen 55 Steel - is seen on sea trials in the North Sea

55m superyacht IRIS BLUE – a Heesen 55 Steel – is seen on sea trials in the North Sea

Luxury 47m sailing catamaran ARTEXPLORER is launched as a unique travelling art gallery

Luxury 47m sailing catamaran ARTEXPLORER is launched as a unique travelling art gallery

77m explorer yacht LA DATCHA ready for guests looking for an adventure-filled charter vacation around the world

77m explorer yacht LA DATCHA ready for guests looking for an adventure-filled charter vacation around the world

Five beautiful yachts with on board spa facilities for an ultimate luxury superyacht charter experience

Five beautiful yachts with on board spa facilities for an ultimate luxury superyacht charter experience

Beautiful 32m motor yacht ALMOST THERE available for charter in California and the Pacific Northwest

Beautiful 32m motor yacht ALMOST THERE available for charter in California and the Pacific Northwest

The International SeaKeepers Society, sailing yacht MAIDEN and Seabed 2030 collaborate during the 2023/24 Ocean Globe Race

The International SeaKeepers Society, sailing yacht MAIDEN and Seabed 2030 collaborate during the 2023/24 Ocean Globe Race

Performance sailing yacht L’HIPPOCAMPE available for charter on both sides of the Atlantic

Performance sailing yacht L’HIPPOCAMPE available for charter on both sides of the Atlantic

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First refuelling for Russia’s Akademik Lomonosov floating NPP

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The FNPP includes two KLT-40S reactor units. In such reactors, nuclear fuel is not replaced in the same way as in standard NPPs – partial replacement of fuel once every 12-18 months. Instead, once every few years the entire reactor core is replaced with and a full load of fresh fuel.

The KLT-40S reactor cores have a number of advantages compared with standard NPPs. For the first time, a cassette core was used, which made it possible to increase the fuel cycle to 3-3.5 years before refuelling, and also reduce by one and a half times the fuel component in the cost of the electricity produced. The operating experience of the FNPP provided the basis for the design of the new series of nuclear icebreaker reactors (series 22220). Currently, three such icebreakers have been launched.

The Akademik Lomonosov was connected to the power grid in December 2019, and put into commercial operation in May 2020.

Electricity generation from the FNPP at the end of 2023 amounted to 194 GWh. The population of Pevek is just over 4,000 people. However, the plant can potentially provide electricity to a city with a population of up to 100,000. The FNPP solved two problems. Firstly, it replaced the retiring capacities of the Bilibino Nuclear Power Plant, which has been operating since 1974, as well as the Chaunskaya Thermal Power Plant, which is more than 70 years old. It also supplies power to the main mining enterprises located in western Chukotka. In September, a 490 km 110 kilovolt power transmission line was put into operation connecting Pevek and Bilibino.

Image courtesy of TVEL

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As U. of Arizona Confronts Budget Cuts, Workers and Students Brace for the Worst

The public university, the largest employer in the Tucson area, says it’s facing a $177 million shortfall. Critics worry that lower-tier workers and Arizona students will be hit hardest by efforts to cut back.

People walk around red buildings in sunny weather, with palm trees in the background.

By Jack Healy

Reporting from Tucson, Ariz.

Like thousands of people in southern Arizona, Josh Ramos’s fate is intertwined with the University of Arizona. His mother’s job as a university accountant supports the family, and Mr. Ramos’s education, by qualifying him for a discount that cuts his tuition by 75 percent.

“This job has brought us a lot of stability,” said Mr. Ramos, 18, a college freshman.

But the University of Arizona stunned the state late last year by revealing a $177 million shortfall in its more than $2 billion annual budget. Now, as the 40,000-student campus braces for layoffs, Mr. Ramos is worried. About his mother’s job. About having to drop out. About his family’s future.

And the whole state is worried that southern Arizona will suffer if the region’s largest, most dependable employer loses credibility and trust.

The turmoil has shaken the heavily Democratic city of Tucson, where many residents and university employees blame mismanagement at the top.

They say university leaders bumbled into catastrophe by spending millions of dollars on top-end salaries, athletics, risky expansion efforts and tuition subsidies for out-of-state students. Now they worry that middle-class workers and Arizona students will be hit hardest by efforts to cut budgets.

“It’s going to strike at the heart of Tucson,” said Leila Hudson, an associate professor and chair of the faculty.

Other flagship public schools including Penn State and West Virginia University have grappled with budget cuts recently because of inflation and sagging enrollment. But the problems at Arizona galled many people there because the school appeared to be booming. Student numbers and revenues are rising, and the university is earning more money from research grants and state funding.

The university’s administrators say that inflation, the pandemic and widespread overspending have contributed to its financial problems, and that they are trying to fix the budget without hurting the university’s academics or research. They say that despite the deficit, the university is not in danger of running out of cash.

“The university has lost some credibility in the community, and a little trust we need to regain,” John Arnold, the interim chief financial officer, said in an interview. Mr. Arnold is also the executive director of the Arizona Board of Regents, which oversees Arizona’s public universities.

The university’s response has failed to satisfy its critics, or Gov. Katie Hobbs, a Democrat. In a letter to university leaders last month, she said there was “no coherent vision” for a way forward, and criticized the school for a lack of accountability and transparency and threatened to change its leadership.

To some, the financial mess highlights a widening class divide in higher education, where top administrators and coaches can make $1 million a year while lower-tier instructors and part-time faculty say they scrape by on less than $50,000.

Faculty members say they already endured furloughs during the pandemic, and that teaching slots and staff jobs have sat empty in recent years. While they struggled to keep up, they said, the university acquired a troubled for-profit online college and spent more than $60 million to prop up the athletic department.

The university’s president, Robert C. Robbins, struck an optimistic tone in a Feb. 9 update that described the school’s financial plans, saying, “I am confident that, together, we will emerge from this challenge stronger.”

But that has not assuaged the anxiety and anger on campus, which grew after The Arizona Daily Star reported that Lisa Rulney, the university’s chief financial officer who resigned amid the mess, had stayed on as an adviser and was still being paid a $500,000 salary. Ms. Rulney did not respond to requests for comment.

“We’re all on the same stormy seas, but they’re in yachts, and we’re in rafts,” said Gary Rhoades, an education professor who has spent months delving into the university’s spending to understand the roots of the problems.

The university has now frozen hiring and pay raises, and faculty members who have been tracking the budget discussions said they were bracing for as many as 1,000 job cuts. Earlier this month, the administration asked individual schools and departments to sketch out budget cuts from 5 to 15 percent.

A union representing campus workers says about a handful of people on year-to-year contracts have already been laid off.

Students and campus workers have responded by holding protests outside the administration building, urging leaders to “chop from the top.”

They urged the university to start with its dozens of vice presidents instead of targeting rank-and-file workers. Mr. Arnold, the interim head of finance, said the university would be scrutinizing “every one” of its vice presidents. Expanding bureaucracies have also plagued other universities and colleges, and led to higher administrative costs and tuition.

The chasm between the university’s five- and six-figure workers is particularly acute in a city like Tucson, population 540,000, where an influx of buyers during the pandemic helped push median house prices to $ 385,000 from about $ 250,000 .

Even the university’s food pantry is straining : It announced this winter that rising prices and more users had forced it to stop offering hygiene products and cut back on some of its food options.

“I’m so excited to work here, and I feel like the school is not excited to have me,” said Spencer Gantt, who works in information technology and is a member of United Campus Workers Arizona, the local union that has organized most of the demonstrations against layoffs.

Jobs like Mr. Gantt’s may be some of the most vulnerable. A financial plan released this month showed that the university would start cutting costs in administrative areas such as human resources, marketing, communications and, to Mr. Gantt’s dismay, information technology.

“I’m very scared,” he said. He worried about not having a job a month from now, and said he didn’t even know whether he was at risk of being laid off. He is putting off getting an oil change on his Toyota Corolla until he has some certainty.

Some students and staff members say they have started to notice the effects of the money problems. Samantha Gonsalves Wetherell, 21, said she was saddened that the university delayed releasing a climate-action plan that she had spent much of her undergraduate years helping to create.

“We’re all looking for answers, but nobody knows,” said Maria Sohn Hasman, a program coordinator working at the university. “I wake up every single day wondering if today’s the day I’m going to be laid off.”

The university has yet to detail all of the cuts, but says it plans to save $27 million by permanently eliminating vacant jobs. It also said it would hire outside consultants to scrutinize the finances of the athletic department and a polarizing new online venture, the University of Arizona Global Campus.

The university started the program by paying $1 to acquire a for-profit, online-only school called Ashford University in 2020. The deal added tens of thousands of new online students to the university’s rolls.

But critics say it also saddles the university with more than $200 million in new costs, and yokes the university to a school that state and federal officials say cheated students by misleading them about costs and the value of their degrees, leaving them with little to show but debt.

On Tuesday the Arizona Board of Regents released a report detailing how and why it had acquired Ashford, in response to Arizona’s governor demanding more information about the deal. The board said it had not “brushed aside” concerns about Ashford’s business practices, and said Ashford had assured the university that those “practices had been corrected.”

Lawyers who have represented Ashford’s parent company did not respond to requests for comment.

The university said its global campus had been “cash positive” for the university so far, largely because the university received an infusion of money with the acquisition. The global campus is expected to run a $2.5 million deficit in the current fiscal year but make money next year, according to the university’s budget projections.

Pam Scott, a university spokeswoman, said the new campus lets the university “provide thousands of more students access to a high quality, world-class education — students who otherwise might not have the opportunity.” Since taking over, the university says it has shifted focus away from recruiting students and toward keeping them in school and on a path to success.

With nearly 17,000 workers , the university is the largest employer in the Tucson area, and it says it pumps about $4 billion into the economy each year.

Even amid the turmoil, the sunny red brick campus pulses with energy and academic feats.

Enormous mirrors built in a university lab beneath the football bleachers are used to peer into the deepest corners of space. Students inside a campus building made to resemble a desert canyon are busy learning about sustainable desert agriculture. Scientists who have pioneered the science of studying tree rings are using them to decipher climate change and ancient disasters.

One afternoon last week, Hadi Alim, 22, breezed past all of it as he contemplated whether his family would have a future on campus. His father, who works maintaining the university’s computer networks, has started driving for Uber in case he loses his job.

Mr. Alim, a college junior studying sustainably built environments, pays his own tuition, which he said he could afford only because of the discount he gets as the son of an employee. He said he had started looking at finishing college abroad, somewhere cheaper, as a fallback.

“I just try and take it one day at a time,” he said, “and graduate as soon as possible.”

Jack Healy is a Phoenix-based national correspondent who focuses on the fast-changing politics and climate of the Southwest. He has worked in Iraq and Afghanistan and is a graduate of the University of Missouri’s journalism school. More about Jack Healy

IMAGES

  1. MY AURORA Yacht • Robert Conconi $13M Superyacht

    robert conconi yacht

  2. MY AURORA Yacht • Robert Conconi $13M Superyacht

    robert conconi yacht

  3. Inside AURORA Yacht • Nordhavn • 2013 • Value $13M • Owner Robert

    robert conconi yacht

  4. MY AURORA Yacht • Robert Conconi $13M Superyacht

    robert conconi yacht

  5. MY AURORA Yacht • Robert Conconi $13M Superyacht

    robert conconi yacht

  6. SuperYachtFan Inside MY AURORA Yacht • Nordhavn • 2013 • Value $13M

    robert conconi yacht

COMMENTS

  1. MY AURORA Yacht • Robert Conconi $13M Superyacht

    MY AURORA Yacht • Robert Conconi $13M Superyacht Yacht » MY Aurora Exploring the Intriguing Journey of MY Aurora: A Nordhavn Yacht Legacy Yacht Owner Photos Location For Sale & Charter News Motor Yacht Aurora Previous Next 1 2 3 4 5 6 The MY Aurora yacht, a marvelous symbol of nautical engineering, was brought to life by Nordhavn in 2013.

  2. BOB CONCONI • Net Worth $200 Million • House • Yacht

    BOB CONCONI • Net Worth $200 Million • House • Yacht • Private Jet • CSRS Yacht Owner Photos Location For Sale & Charter News Who is Bob Conconi? Bob Conconi, the driving force behind the successful Conconi Group, is a well-known figure in the real estate and private equity spheres.

  3. Nordhavn Facts

    Mr. Conconi no longer owns the Aurora, however, he spent 3 years repairing, at great expense, most all the problems that existed when she arrived at his home. Mr. Conconi's only motivation and dispute with PAE was over the yacht's state upon arrival and PAE's failure to uphold the company's obligation to complete her construction as contracted.

  4. Megayacht=Mega Lawsuit (BLOG) (Video)

    Bob Conconi, a wealthy Canadian businessman and philanthropist, was overjoyed with his new Nordhavn 120 when he wrote: "You have to experience the majesty of Aurora, her stature and magnitude to get a starting point as to your feelings. She is impressive beyond my or Diane's expectations.

  5. Boat Review: Nordhavn 86

    Bob Conconi was 32 when he got his first boat, a 28-foot lapstrake mahogany runabout with twin gas Chryslers. His second boat was a 42-foot aluminum trawler. But 10 years ago, Conconi's third boat was his first Nordhavn, a 62. He loved his 62 but eventually wanted to move up to a larger boat.

  6. Nordhavn 120 delivery

    Would Mr and/or Mrs Conconi be willing to post to the forum their impressions and feelings of the yacht, the build process and now the experience of crossing the Pacific to Vancouver? Bob Conconi in Vancouver, BC, responds: Doug, You have to experience the majesty of Aurora, her stature and magnitude to get a starting point as to your feelings.

  7. Nordhavn 120 Aurora

    The Conconis, who progressed from a Nordhavn 86 (26.2 meters) to the 120 (36.5 meters), were seeking more space to entertain their four children and numerous friends. "But beyond that," Bob Conconi says, "some things can't be explained. Maybe you want a new yacht because it's possible.". He is convinced Aurora 's quality is due to ...

  8. The Real Nordhavn

    Last year, PassageMaker wrote an article about a vessel that Robert Conconi purchased and named the Aurora. While reading the piece, Mr. Conconi was not only surprised that the article was...

  9. Statements

    The Nordhavn Fact is that Mr. Conconi's situation was made worse every turn by PAE. The company did not contribute or compensate for the work Mr. Conconi had to perform on his own vessel. ... - Robert Conconi. During the trial, Dan Streech, Jim Leishman, Jeff Leishman and Trevor Smith all stated that Mike Tellaria demonstrated all systems ...

  10. Pac. Asian Enters., Inc. v. Conconi

    Robert Conconi and Diane Conconi (the Conconis) bought a custom built yacht for $16 million from Pacific Asian Enterprises, Inc. (PAE). A dispute arose as to the final amount owed to PAE by the Conconis for the yacht. A jury awarded PAE $722,161 in damages on its breach of contract claim against the Conconis.

  11. Superyachtfan

    Canadian millionaire Bob Conconi was the owner of the Nordhavn yacht Aurora. He sold her earlier 2017 after a legal batle with the yacht's builder. Conconi is the co-founder of Canadian Securities Registration Systems or CSRS. CSRS was active in the outsourced registration and search industry.

  12. BOB CONCONI • Net Worth $200 Million • House • Yacht • Private Jet

    Bob Conconi is the founder of the Canadian Securities Registration Systems or CSRS. His Net Worth is $200 million. He was owner of the yacht Aurora.

  13. PDF Offshore Interiors Survey (1)

    of the yacht Robert Conconi and access to the vessel was facilitated by Captain Mark Vanderbyl. The on board walk through was completed by Robert Ruzzi and Steve Davis over two days on April 7 and 16, 2014. This report was then assembled in the weeks after the walk through was completed. Interior survey scope

  14. PDF Yachting Dec 2010-cover

    Bob Conconi was 32 when he got his first boat, a 28-foot lapstrake mahogany runabout with twin gas Chryslers. His second boat was a 42-foot aluminum trawler. But 10 years ago, Conconi's third boat was his first Nordhavn, a 62. He loved his 62 but eventually wanted to move up to a larger boat. So, Conconi's fourth boat Was also a Nordhavn.

  15. Ripoff Report

    *Author of original report: Robert Conconi Response *REBUTTAL Owner of company: PAE/Nordhavn response Print this Report Email this Report share Tweet Business Rating: Rate this business Tell us has your experience with this business or person been good? They're awesome! (0) Super Helpful (0) They're not great but not a Ripoff (0) Total Ripoff (0)

  16. Beware When Buying a Boat (or Anything Else)

    In a nice yacht, you can set out to sea on a beautiful day, kick back, and just drift as you watch the sun playing off of the ocean with nothing around you for miles - and do so in style. ... However, for Canadian philanthropist Robert Conconi, it was a dream that turned into a nightmare. Conconi advanced the company Pacific Asian Enterprises ...

  17. Bob Conconi: A Business Tycoon's Journey from CSRS to Philanthropy

    The article provides an in-depth look into the life of Bob Conconi, founder of the Conconi Group and CSRS, and his journey to philanthropy. ... BOB CONCONI • Net Worth $200 Million • House • Yacht • Частный реактивный самолет • CSRS. Robert L Conconi.

  18. Luxury Yacht Legend MOSCOW INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW 2018 ...

    The houseboatzania launching an innovative high-end luxury yacht houseboat home design potentially as a display of exhibition of the Luxury Yacht Legend MOSC...

  19. Sunrise Yachts Sponsor 2011 Moscow International Boat Show (MIBS)

    The Paolo Scanu-designed Sunrise 45 yacht is an ocean-going cruising yacht that was released in 2009 to much acclaim at this was the group's first-ever model. Sunrise Yachts was founded in 2007 by the German entrepreneur Herbert P Baum along with the French-British yacht builder Guillaume Roché.

  20. Contacts MindYachts

    New yachts; Charter; News; Contacts; EN RU. Home; Contacts; Contacts. Central office MindYachts . 125212, Moscow, Leningradskoye Highway, 39 p. 6 Royal Yacht Club ; Miami +1 786 233 7721. London +44 203 807 94 54. Moscow +7 495 215 19 11. [email protected]; Miami +1 786 233 7721.

  21. BOB CONCONI • Valeur nette $200 millions • Maison • Yacht

    Yacht Robert Conconi. Il était propriétaire du Yacht de Nordhavn Aurore. Bob et Diane Conconi ont possédé plusieurs yachts, tous nommés Aurora. Leur dernier yacht était un Nordhavn de 120 pieds. Alors qu'ils possédaient auparavant des versions 86 pieds et 62 pieds.

  22. First refuelling for Russia's Akademik Lomonosov floating NPP

    Rosatom's fuel company TVEL has supplied nuclear fuel for reactor 1 of the world's only floating NPP (FNPP), the Akademik Lomonosov, moored at the city of Pevek, in Russia's Chukotka Autonomous Okrug. The supply of fuel was transported along the Northern Sea Route. The first ever refuelling of the FNPP is planned to begin before the end of ...

  23. University of Arizona's $177 Million Shortfall Rattles the State

    But the University of Arizona stunned the state late last year by revealing a $177 million shortfall in its more than $2 billion annual budget. Now, as the 40,000-student campus braces for layoffs ...

  24. BOB CONCONI • Vermögen $200 Millionen • Haus • Yacht

    Robert Conconi Yacht. Er war der Besitzer des Nordhavn-Yacht Aurora. Bob und Diane Conconi besaßen mehrere Yachten, alle mit dem Namen Aurora. Ihre letzte Yacht war eine 120 Fuß lange Nordhavn. Während sie zuvor 86-Fuß- und 62-Fuß-Versionen besaßen.