• THE PRINCESS PASSPORT
  • Email Newsletter
  • Yacht Walkthroughs
  • Destinations
  • Electronics
  • Boating Safety

Yachting Magazine logo

Sum of Its Parts: Fleming 55

  • By George Sass Sr.
  • Updated: September 9, 2011

fleming yachts 55 review

In my lifetime, a small handful of production boats have become true classics, if not legends. The Bertram 31, Grand Banks 42, Hinckley Bermuda 40 and Hatteras 53 come to mind and are examples of designs that enjoyed lengthy, successful production runs. Long after they were discontinued, they have remained popular on the brokerage market, sometimes commanding premium prices.

Among these recent classics, one model remains in production today. Hull No. 212 of the Fleming 55 was delivered in April 2011, and a number of new 55s are in production at Fleming ‘s yard in Taiwan ( see the gallery with detail photos here ). First launched in 1985, the Fleming 55 owes its longevity not only to its successful design, but also to the company’s commitment to making improvements to each hull it builds.

Duncan Cowie and Adi Shard, the talented Brits who have taken over the management of the company from its founder, Tony Fleming, say each new Fleming 55 incorporates eight to 10 improvements over the previous hull. Based on building an average of 10 55s per year, the math equates to 400 to 500 changes over just a five-year period.

fleming yachts 55 review

Keeping this classic up to date is largely the result of the relationship among the factory, Fleming’s dealers and its owners. Chuck Hovey Yachts on the West Coast and Burr Yacht Sales on the East Coast have been Fleming’s only dealers in the United States since the brand’s earliest days. Along with Fleming’s select dealers in Canada and Europe, they have a valuable, historical understanding of the product. “I can’t remember how many times a customer has asked ‘What if we did this?’” comments Ray Currey of Burr Yacht Sales. “Some of these suggestions make very good sense, and we pass them along to the factory to be considered for future production.”

While Fleming embraces new ideas and technology, the company is quick to point out that it makes changes only after thorough research and sea trials, as opposed to catering to whims and fancies. For example, the 55’s centerline hallway leading to three staterooms and two heads all on one level is a hallmark of Fleming’s design. This arrangement eliminates steep, hard-to-negotiate stairways needed to accommodate a midships master stateroom — a feature that may seem attractive but which creates unintended design consequences. Also sacred to Fleming’s design is its dedicated pilothouse, which is three steps up from the ship’s living area. Because one does not pass through the pilothouse to the staterooms or heads below, the ship’s operation is undisturbed while guests freely enjoy the yacht’s living and sleeping areas.

Likewise, the Fleming’s semidisplacement hull design, with its sharp entry, rounded bilge sections forward, hard chines aft and moderate deadrise, has proven itself to be comfortable, seaworthy and efficient throughout its cruising-speed range of 8 to 18 knots. With so many Fleming 55s safely cruising throughout the world, the company knows it has a winner and has not changed its basic hull design Likewise, most of Fleming’s owners use their yachts the way Tony Fleming originally intended — for coastal and offshore cruising. The company keeps an open line of communication with its owners, who are only too happy to share their personal tips and tricks, the best of which have been incorporated into production. And last but not least, Tony Fleming continues to cruise the world’s oceans on his personal Fleming, vigorously testing new ideas and equipment. ( See more of these adventures here .)

fleming yachts 55 review

The complexity of today’s Fleming 55 is a far cry from when Tony Fleming launched his first hull. To ensure that its boats comply with all current safety and construction standards, as well as federal regulations, Fleming has taken a major step forward in having its new boats certified by the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA).

The NMMA certification process was no casual undertaking; it required rigorous inspections of the company’s facility in Taiwan as well as finished boats located in Maryland and Vancouver, British Columbia. In addition, all Fleming models will now be inspected on an annual basis. NMMA-certified boats must also meet the stringent standards of ABYC (American Boat & Yacht Council), as well as comply with Environmental Protection Agency requirements for emissions and wastewater systems.

While all boats sold in the United States must meet U.S. Coast Guard minimum regulations, NMMA-certified boats, like the Fleming 55, benefit from this vigorous, third-party inspection program. Tony Fleming must have known from the beginning that he had a winner in his Fleming 55. But only through a consistent program of upgrading, improving and refining the original has it reached its current status of a thoroughly modern living legend.

Fleming Yachts, 949-645-1024; www.flemingyachts.com

_ Read more about Fleming’s yachts._

  • More: Fleming Yachts , Motoryachts , Yachts
  • More Yachts

Wooden Boats LimoTender BLU 8.3m

Next-Level Limo Tender

Heesen 164-foot MY

Heesen Delivers the 164-foot MY “ALP”

Patrone 45

Tommaso Spadolini, Patrone Moreno Collaborate on Patrone 45

Sunseeker 100

Sunseeker 100 Yacht Reviewed

ThirdHome option

New Elevated Charter Experiences

Patrone 45

For Sale: 2002 Sunseeker 64 Manhattan

Sunseeker 100

  • Digital Edition
  • Customer Service
  • Privacy Policy
  • Email Newsletters
  • Cruising World
  • Sailing World
  • Salt Water Sportsman
  • Sport Fishing
  • Wakeboarding

an image, when javascript is unavailable

  • 672 Wine Club
  • Motorcycles
  • Car of the Month
  • Destinations
  • Men’s Fashion
  • Watch Collector
  • Art & Collectibles
  • Vacation Homes
  • Celebrity Homes
  • New Construction
  • Home Design
  • Electronics
  • Fine Dining
  • Gateway Bronco
  • On Location – Olympic Games Paris 2024
  • One&Only
  • The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua
  • Saratoga Spring Water
  • Wynn Las Vegas
  • Sports & Leisure
  • Health & Wellness
  • Best of the Best
  • The Ultimate Gift Guide

How Fleming’s 55-Foot Cruiser Became One of the Boating World’s Most Successful Designs

The fleming 55 is in a category of one among offshore cruisers, sporting the same exterior and hull as its 1986 debut., howard walker, howard walker's most recent stories.

  • Meet the Bugatti Tourbillon, the 1,800 HP Hybrid Hypercar Replacing the Chiron
  • This 112-Foot Superyacht Has an Interior That’ll Make Your Manhattan Condo Jealous
  • This 1967 Shelby GT500 Has Been Reimagined to Perfection. Now It’s up for Grabs.
  • Share This Article

The Fleming 55 motoryacht is still going strong after 36 years.

Related Stories

  • Ferrari’s First EV Will Debut Next Year—and a Second One Is Already in the Works
  • Lexus’s Next Supercar Is Coming in 2026

Of course, there have been some modifications. While the hull, superstructure and structural layout of the interior have changed little since the original design, the interior design has constantly evolved to reflect the wish lists of the 55’s intrepid band of owners to stay in sync with contemporary fashion trends.

The Fleming 55 motoryacht is still going strong after 36 years.

“It’s a lot like Porsche’s 911. The silhouette is the same but pretty much everything else has changed,” says Kevin Althoff, brand specialist with Fleming East Coast dealer Burr Yacht Sales, the world’s top Fleming seller.

Except for the interior-exterior comparison, the Fleming 55 is nothing like the Porsche 911. It was designed as a no-nonsense, long-distance cruiser that two people, typically a couple, could handle alone, without crew, with an offshore hull that could take on big seas, while also voyaging for thousands of miles on a single tank of diesel. It fueled the dreams of hundreds of intrepid cruisers who wanted to see the world on their terms.

Adding to the appeal, the 55’s semi-displacement hull from American naval architect Larry Drake has also passed the test of time. That distinctive, flared bow keeps the decks dry even in gnarly seas, while the long, deep keel not only protects the props in skinny water and helps the yacht track straight, especially in following seas.

fleming yachts 55 review

And harking back to the Porsche 911 analogy, it’s the mechanical improvements that have helped the 55 stay modern and relevant in today’s crowded cruiser market. The latest 55s come with Cummins QSC 500-hp common-rail turbo diesels that can punch the 68,000-pound Fleming to a very un-trawler-like 21 mph.

Throttle back to a typical 11-mph cruising speed, and the efficiency of the Cummins delivers a miserly fuel burn of just 10 gallons per hour, or a gallon per mile. Ease down to 9 mph and the 55 will run for over 2,000 miles on a tank.

“It’s this duality our owners love. The ability to cruise near silently and economically at low speeds, yet if the weather takes a turn for the worst, there’s the speed to get you home fast,” says Althoff.

Inside, it’s all old-world elegance and craftsmanship, with lovely satin-varnished cabinetry and teak-and-holly floors mixed with contemporary fabrics and upholstery.

The rather narrow main salon opens out onto the roughly 250-square-foot rear deck, which is big enough for a party. At the forward end is the well-equipped U-shaped galley in the favored “galley-up” location.

The salon also comes with one of our favorite features, a dumb waiter that shuttles food and beverages to the flybridge, avoiding the need to carry everything up steps. That’s probably a one-of-a-kind feature for a 55-footer.

Below-decks, the layout is essentially unchanged from the original design. That means a long, central corridor with twin-berth cabins on either side. The rather cramped master cabin pushed up into the bow is one of the yacht’s few drawbacks.

Fleming responded to criticisms of that tight master by introducing the Fleming 58 in 2012, which could be specified with a spacious master cabin amidships across the full beam. Despite that, the 55 continues to be the brand’s best-seller.

Which proves that bigger isn’t always better. Even after 36 years of production, and a price that starts at just over $3 million, there’s still a three-year waiting list for the iconic 55.

Read More On:

  • Fleming Yachts

More Marine

Holterman Shipyard X-95 Yacht

This New 95-Foot Yacht Pairs the Agility of a Runaboat With the Luxury of a Superyacht

Palm Beach 85 Skyl

Palm Beach Motor Yachts Just Unveiled a Sleek New 90-Foot Flagship

Lürssen Superyacht Haven

Lürssen’s Newest Superyacht Is a 269-Foot Tri-Deck Behemoth

Superyacht Ice Bear

This 170-Foot Sportfishing Superyacht Is One of the World’s First—Here’s a Look Inside

magazine cover

The Grand UK Debut

JULY 17 - 19, 2024 Head to the British countryside to test and evaluate the top luxury and performance vehicles of 2024.

Give the Gift of Luxury

Latest Galleries in Marine

Holterman Shipyard X-95 Yacht

Holterman X-95 Yacht in Photos

Le Ponant

Meet ‘Le Ponant,’ a 288-Foot Cruise Ship With Big Superyacht Energy

More from our brands, china’s 618 online shopping festival promoted steep discounts, birmingham goes big to honor mays and enshrine baseball history, studiocanal tv appoints margaret conway as head of physical production, at basel’s first digital art fair, collectors and artists debate whether the traditional art world matters, the best yoga mats for any practice, according to instructors.

Quantcast

fleming yachts 55 review

Fleming 55: An Updated Classic Cruising Boat

' src=

The quintessential serious cruising boat, the Fleming 55 has become a classic since it was first launched in 1986. Some 235 Fleming 55s have been built since then, reflecting hundreds of refinements and tweaks to reflect changing technologies and lessons learned on the water. Most of these refinements, of course, come from Tony Fleming himself, the founder of the company who cruises around the world on his Fleming 65 Venture, which he uses as a test bed to make sure the boats are constantly updated.

A pilothouse motoryacht, the Fleming 55 has three staterooms and two heads, a large, 130-square-feet cockpit, a flying bridge that can seat 11 plus an aft boat deck. The comfortable salon, with galley forward, and the pilothouse, with an L-shaped settee and interior access to the flybridge, all are filled with rich teak; fit and finish are exquisite throughout the boat.

The 55 has a moderate deadrise semi-displacement hull, with a deep keel to protect the running gear. Powered by twin 500-hp Cummins diesels, the 55 tops out at about 18 knots, but if you dial back to 8 knots the boat has a range of 2,000 nm. And Flemings are safe at any speed. I rode out a night of 60-knot winds off California’s Channel Islands on Venture three years ago with Tony Fleming, and the boat was solid as a rock.

Specs.: LOA: 55’9”; Beam: 16’0”; Draft: 5’0”; Disp,: 67,801 lbs.; Fuel: 1,000 gals., Water: 300 gals.; Power: 2×500-hp Cummins diesels.

http://flemingyachts.com

About Author

' src=

Related Posts

fleming yachts 55 review

New Bluephire 34 with All-Glass Roof

fleming yachts 55 review

Sunreef Launches 100 Power 2.0

fleming yachts 55 review

Palm Beach Unveils New 85 Flagship

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Boats for sale

Sell your Boat

News & Reviews

Help & FAQs

Fleming 55

2012 Boat Review: Fleming 55

I love my job and end most days with a sense of satisfaction in my toil. However, driving to the hotel at the conclusion of our day on the Fleming 55 in the emerald waters of Moreton Island, a cosy glow of genuine contentment was accompanied by a beam the Cheshire Cat would be proud of. Like a drug, the Fleming 55 seems to irresistibly mood altering. Repeatedly described as the benchmark of pilothouse cruisers the Fleming came with a reputation I found somewhat intimidating. What if I didn't like it, or worse still found serious flaws in its construction. Would it be me at fault or would it be the boat. Fortunately that situation did not arise.

The 55 hull was first launched in 1986 and is claimed by its promoters to have been judged one of the 10 best looking boats of all time by an influential boating magazine. It wasn't Trade-a-Boat, but it's not a bad idea for a future story.

This boat, appropriately named Friday, is certainly a looker. It's one of those times when the class isn't intangible; you can see it in the depth of the paintwork and the quality of the fittings. Take one step aboard, through the wide gate in the side bulwark and you're hooked forever - much like sliding into the back seat of a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost. "Home James, if you please."

One of the more interesting aspects of the Fleming 55 is its mixed heritage. She looks like a born-and-bred eastern United States blue-blood complete with a lifetime's supply of Long Island Ice Tea, but she's actually nothing of the sort.

Company founder and global roaming talisman Tony Fleming is an ex-pat Brit who resides in the US. If the Fleming brand has a rival then it would have to be Grand Banks; the company Tony Fleming spent 22 years working for. The company itself is based in Costa Mesa, California, while the vessels are constructed at the Tung Hwa factory in Taiwan. For those that are not aware Taiwan is home to some of the highest quality boatbuilding yards in the world, including the Tung Hwa yard. This mixed input of vision and genetics ensures the Fleming range doesn't suffer from any of the tunnel vision or staid philosophies sometimes found in similar stables. Indeed the company is not scared to try a new idea or two. Take a look at the depth of finish in those timber railings. Only they are not timber at all, it's an imitation product with a gelcoat finish that De Beers couldn't pick from the real thing.

This is the sort of radical approach that gets traditionalists nervously shuffling and muttering "it's just not cricket" behind the closed doors of the gentlemen's clubs, but for me it speaks volumes of a decisive team who understands their customers are time-poor. Surely they can pay someone to re-sand the varnish two to three times yearly? Why would you if the imitation product looks better, lasts exponentially longer, and costs less. BUILT FOR THE SEA In an interview with Tony Fleming (worthwhile reading and available online), Tony states his objective from the onset was to build the best vessels available for coastal and offshore cruising. He says he took a fresh and objective look at every system and every piece of equipment on offer and selected only those best suited to serious bluewater cruising. From there he put the experience of lifetime building the best and set to work.

Every vessel I have stepped onboard that is truly built to go to sea has a common denominator - weight. At more than 30 tonnes dry the Fleming 55 is around 8000kg heavier than the bulk of vessels in the 55ft range. Most modern vessels use a cored construction technique, where the hull is composed of light core material sandwiched between two relatively thin layers of glass. These boats are lighter and faster than those constructed of solid glass, but this performance comes at a compromise in terms of seakeeping and hull longevity. 

Tony Fleming has always preferred solid glass and is often accused of overbuilding the Fleming range. His response is that of the true bluewater sailor. "Ninety-five per cent of the time a boat will never be in seas or in circumstances that test its limits," says Fleming, "but on that rare occasion, perhaps a collision with a container in the middle of the night, it is reassuring to know that boats identical to yours have survived fully intact, and that your builder designed the boat for just such an eventuality."

He also persists with full-length keels in all his hulls. Full-length keels improve stability by lowering the centre of gravity and providing increased resistance to rocking effects. They also protect the running gear from potentially crippling damage. Personally, I am not convinced that a full-length keel is always a good thing on a high-speed vessel running in a significant sea. I have had some interesting and quite scary experiences when the keel has tried to force its way to the surface due to the effect of planing forces. No such issue would arise on a Fleming 55 though. High speed is never a priority on a Fleming although, apparently, they will exceed 20kts if enough horsepower is made available. SPACE TO MOVE Anyone who has spent time clambering around the sides of working vessels like a spider monkey will be delighted to find themselves on a vessel where a trip to the anchor locker is no more hazardous than a stroll to the letterbox. There is no shortage of grabrails, but in most conditions these will be surplus to requirements. High coamings and 22in-wide sidedecks ensure the comfort and safety of all crewmembers at all times.

The Portuguese bridge deck is stylish and it performs at least two important functions. In a heavy seaway it prevents any significant volumes of water from flooding down the sidedecks, and it acts as an extra barrier to prevent the youngsters using the bow section as their own personal play pen. "Do not open this gate - or else!"

Two things I was slightly surprised to note was the lack of  scuppers in those sidedecks (perhaps it doesn't need them), and it was interesting to see that the main entry gate opens inwards rather than outwards, which is more the norm for vessels engaging in regular passagemaking. This is probably because outwards-opening gates can be difficult to work with at the dock so fair enough on that one. ENTER THE PALACE Step through the rear saloon door and you will find yourself in a world of refinement accentuated by rich and sumptuous furnishings and warmly toned teak. Invest some time researching previous editorial written on the Fleming 55 from around the world and you will find the full thesaurus of generous adjectives and clichés. "Classic", "timeless", "home away from home" - they all fit and are difficult to add to in a meaningful way. Slide that door shut behind you and the space is transformed into one that could be 100 miles from the sea - accept for the view of course.

Clearly Tony Fleming understands how important it is to be capable of providing this level of isolation from the throb and vibration of the engine. He has achieved that goal as well as I have ever observed. It is a delight to experience in flesh but the real payback for passengers is in the restfulness of the effect. Much like noise-cancelling headphones on a long-haul flight, the beautiful acoustics play a much larger role in the pleasure of the journey than most are aware.

PRIVACY FOR ALL The internal configuration, which divides the three primary living spaces into distinctly separate zones, is highly practical and allows guests to make the best use of the various options without disturbing others. An expansive and impressively outfitted galley sits amidships in the same space as the luxurious saloon described in brief above. As any experienced sailor would expect all the benchtops, in fact all the flat surfaces - side-shelves and tabletops included - featured raised sidings. It is pleasing to see this as all too often designers remove these and other simple but essential practicalities, like stovetop fiddles, in a misguided attempt to build boats that feel more like apartments. Move forward and down the beautifully timber-trimmed staircase and you arrive in the main accommodation areas. Again the Fleming organisation have stayed with the classic and well proven layout of a generous master cabin with adjoining en suite in the forepeak, a VIP cabin aft and to port, with a crew cabin featuring twin singles to starboard. Naturally these two cabins are serviced by a separate bathroom that double-duties as a dayhead.

Without making unnecessary statements of the obvious these sleeping quarters are all we could ask in classic styling and anyone who appreciates the pure pleasure of sleeping on a quiet sea in total comfort will love the Fleming 55. It should be mentioned that there are enough alternative berthing options on offer to ensure your Fleming 55 can be tailored to suit your precise requirements.

The wardrobes and other amenities in the master cabin, and indeed everywhere we look on Friday, are quite frankly beautifully appointed. It's good to see the storage under the mattress hydraulically accessed as that takes the effort out of utilising that space but it was the dedicated escape hatch that really caught my eye. Enclosed seamlessly into the roof it lowers to reveal a wooden staircase built to the same standard of excellence as the rest of the vessel. It seems trivial to mention but on lesser vessels these are the features that often look rushed in the finishing.

ON TOP OF THE WORLD In balmy Queensland conditions like we enjoyed there could be no better place to appreciate the passage than the expansive flying bridge. A second helm station, which houses all the electronic essentials found in the pilothouse, takes pride of space. But with seating for 11, plenty of refrigeration and a dumbwaiter on hand to keep all and sundry refreshed in total convenience it is unlikely the skipper will find him or herself wanting for company.

Also on Friday's roof is her tender. With so much space on offer it does not encroach in any way. Those wishing to access the cockpit without trekking through the vessel's interior can make use of the trapdoor aft.

DEDICATED PILOTHOUSE For me, this pilothouse is a highlight. As any skipper with a few serious sea miles under their belt can attest there are times, such as in poor weather, limited visibility, or when navigating congested waterways in the dark, when total isolation is required to navigate safely without distraction. The Fleming 55 provides for this necessity with a totally dedicated helm. With doors closed and with a plethora of navigation instruments at the skipper's disposal, making way, under even extreme conditions, can be conducted in a seamanlike manner. If needed, a coffee or an extra set of eyes can be summoned at the touch of a button. BEHIND CLOSED DOORS It is clear to me that Tony Fleming wanted to make a statement in the engineroom. Much of the engineering that supports the twin 500hp Cummins QSC 8.3 powerplants would be considered "old school" by the new generation of boatbuilders. But there is reason born of experience behind items like the traditional stuffing box shaft seals and the manual fuel management system. In simple terms true passagemakers cannot afford total failures of any sort and these relatively simplistic systems will keep working long after an untimely saltwater spray destroys a fly-by-wire system or fatigue causes the catastrophic failure of a shaft seal spring.

Needless to say much of the equipment is considerably heavier than required although I can think of bigger problems to have than an over-engineered engineroom.  Any ships mechanic would be delighted to see the quality of the plumbing and wiring, and the huge amount of servicing space will be music to an aching back.

ON THE WATER With so much weight, and with technology on-hand like ABT? Trac digital stabilisers, Friday's ride was always going to be fabulous. She isn't the quickest but for my money her semi-displacement hull provides the best of both worlds. A top speed of 18kts is achieved a good margin short of wide-open-throttle and pushing her any harder only results in an increased fuel burn. To me, she is completely in her element at 10kts and as such is a vessel clearly designed to be as much about the journey as the destination. In today's world so focused on immediate goals, this philosophy is a breath of fresh air. Cruising on Friday reminded me of the simple pleasure of just being at sea, just for the sake of it.

To say that I was impressed with the Fleming 55 could well be the understatement of my tenure at the helm of <I>Trade-a-Boat</I> magazine. This boat is built to a level that goes a long way towards defining its class.

As others have said in many ways the Fleming 55 is the quintessential bluewater cruising boat. Presented as is she speaks of an age of grace and beauty, and yet is not scared to push the envelope by developing technologies to improve the product without detracting from its mission. As stated above engineering is quite simply first class and answers all the questions I could ask in terms of practicality, longevity and redundancy.

As for lifestyle her utterly unhurried approach is perfectly complemented by the extensive list of features on hand. If the smile I carried for days after the test is anything to go by, and unless your personal requirements are at the extreme end of any spectrum, you will be hard pressed to find better.

Facts & Figures: FLEMING 55

PRICED AS TESTED

OPTIONS FITTED ABT-TRAC stabilisers, Side-Power sternthruster (bowthruster standard), second generator, custom stainless steel fridge-freezer on aft deck, Raymarine electronics, sound systems, flatscreen TVs, hardtop, extended flybridge deck over aft deck/cockpit, extended swimplatform, Wi-Fi, Yacht Sentinel security alarm system, tender, canvas covers, and more

PRICED FROM $1,700,000 (dependent on USD exchange rate)

GENERAL HULL: Solid fibreglass TYPE: Semi-displacement monohull HULL LENGTH: 16.99m LOA: 18.5m BEAM: 4.88m DRAFT: 1.52m WEIGHT: 36,368kg (loaded); 30,754kg (light ship)

CAPACITIES FUEL: 3785lt (four tanks) WATER: 1135lt (four tanks) BLACKWATER: 378lt

ENGINES MAKE/MODEL: 2 x Cummins QSC 8.3 TYPE: Turbo-diesel RATED HP: 500 GEARBOX/RATIO: Twin Disc MG5075A / 2.53:1

SUPPLIED BY Fleming Yachts Australia, Unit 9, 1 Bradly Avenue, Kirribilli, NSW, 2061 Phone: (02) 8920 1444; Sam Nicholas 0412 864 443; Egil Paulsen 0414 233030 Email: [email protected] Website: www.flemingyachts.com

From Trade-a-Boat Issue 427, May-June 2012. Photos by Ellen Dewar. Video by Milkman Productions. 

fleming yachts 55 review

Inquire About This Yacht

Find A Dealer

The Fleming 55 is a well-proven raised pilothouse motoryacht designed for serious cruising. Her semi-displacement hull gives her great flexibility in performance. The Fleming 55 has a range of 2,000 nautical miles at 8 knots yet, with her standard Twin Cummins QSC 500 hp common rail engines, she can attain a top speed of approximately 18 knots. Maximum sustained cruising speed is around 17 knots where her moderate deadrise provides a very comfortable ride. On longer passages, Fleming owners typically cruise at a very economical speed of 10 knots, where the typical fuel burn is slightly more than 10 gph.

The Fleming's deep keel provides protection for the running gear and stability in following seas. Because noise and vibration contribute to fatigue, Fleming has paid special attention to producing a yacht which has become the standard in the industry for its whisper quiet, ultra smooth ride. Fundamental to this achievement is the use of Aquadrive anti-vibration drive systems. 

The Fleming 55 was first introduced in 1986, and since that time it has benefited from a rigorous program of evolution. There have been literally hundreds of improvements made, both big and small. While its legendary hull design remains essentially the same, today's Fleming 55 is a thoroughly modern yacht utilizing advanced technology, materials and construction methods. In 2019 construction of hull number 250 is well underway, making it one of the most successful production yachts in history.

Standard Specifications

60' 9' (18.50 m)

50' 10' (15.5 m)

16' (4.88 m)

5' (1.52 m)

Displacement Light:

67,801 lbs (30,754 kg)

Displacement Full:

80,178 lbs (36,368 kg)

1,000 US gal (3,785 l)

300 US gal (1,135 l)

View Full Specs

Fleming 55 Specifications

View Brochure

Hull 55-213

Hull 55-217

Hull 55-232

Hull 55-247

55-260 (Two-Cabin)

fleming yachts 55 review

Performance Curves

fleming yachts 55 review

Overview Continued...

Foredeck and Forepeak

Special attention has been paid to the ability to set and retrieve heavy ground tackle on the Fleming 55. The fiberglass anchor platform is equipped with twin Maxwell RC12 vertical windlasses with capstans for both rope and 3/8" (10mm) Grade-60 stainless steel chain. The windlass has a plug-in remote control as well as controls in the pilothouse and on the flybridge. Double sets of grooved rollers make it possible to self-launch and stow two 77 lb (35 Kg) Ultra anchors. Hose bibs for salt and fresh water are located next to the anchor platform, and there are deck lockers to port and stbd.

A lock-down hatch on the foredeck provides convenient access to the forepeak, which is separated from the rest of the yacht by a collision bulkhead. It has an area for storage of chain and a separate ventilated rope locker. Each features a bitter end fitting. The forepeak drains directly overboard and can be hosed down without concerns that water will contaminate the bilges.

The flared bow turns aside green water and provides a forward deck of unusually generous proportions. The oval stainless steel handrail has been brought inboard of the sloping bulwarks for convenience and security. To prevent streaking of the hull, the deck scuppers are piped down to the boot stripe, rather than being allowed to drain directly overboard.

Further protection against heavy weather is provided by the design of the Portuguese bridge. There is comfortable seating on its forward side, which is also the location for the forward shorepower inlet. There is ample storage for fenders and lines inside ventilated lockers accessed from the aft side of the Portuguese Bridge, and double doors close off the forward deck areas from the side and bridge decks creating a safe area for small children. There are sturdy, stainless steel handrails around the forward face of the pilothouse and down both side decks.

Easy stairs with handrails designed for both adults and children lead down to the wide and well-protected side-decks, which run down both sides of the boat. Here you will find cleats and chocks for forward and aft spring lines. The inward-opening bulwark doors make for easy and safe boarding.

Aft Deck and Swim Platform

With an area of approximately 250 sq ft. the Fleming 55 aft deck is unusually large. Being all at one level, it becomes an extension of the salon and provides ample space for chairs, donning scuba gear, or fishing. The fiberglass skirt around the edge of the wide teak cap rail conceals mood lighting and hides the engine-room air intakes which are well-protected from salt-laden spray.

Shower fittings for hot and cold water, located next to the inward-opening transom door, are conveniently placed for use while standing on the swim platform. Stainless steel handrails on the transom and a swim ladder, which can be deployed by a person in the water, provide safety and convenience.

Access to the upper boat deck is via a stainless steel ladder and a sliding hatch in the overhead. Access into the lazarette is through lockable hatches, with safe and stylish curved corners. Available as options are a console for cockpit engine controls and a locker, which can be equipped with a basin and faucet, insulated chest or icemaker.

Flying Bridge

The Fleming 55 low-profile flying bridge is spacious and packed with practical amenities. Its double helmseat, with folding stainless steel footrest, folds forward to access storage beneath it. The control console has full engine instrumentation and ample room for electronics. Access to and from the pilothouse is by a protected internal companionway directly from the pilothouse, avoiding the need to navigate perilous steps or ladders where a slip could result in a fall over the side. A wrap-around venturi windshield with stainless steel handrail provides protection from wind and weather.

There is seating for eight guests close to, but out of the way of, the helm station. A fiberglass table is standard and an ingenious pass-thru "dumbwaiter" eliminates the need to carry refreshments up from the galley. Aft of the seating area is the separate boat deck for the tender and a fully hydraulic davit, with remote control. From here, a ladder provides direct access to the lower aft deck.

A popular option is the aft facing boat deck control station that provides the captain with excellent visibility aft. Complete with bow thruster, and engine controls, backing into a tight slip is easier than ever.

The radar arch provides ample room for the full range of antennae required by modern electronic equipment, and an optional fibreglass hardtop is a popular choice.

Main Salon and Galley

The salon in the Fleming 55 features a comfortable L-settee with cushions upholstered over wood frames instead of the usual foam cushions on plywood. The sole is hand-laid teak and holly strips, and all built-in furniture is of superior quality joinerwork with rounded corners. There is a hi-lo table of unique design making it suitable for dining and as a coffee table. To starboard is a cabinet with powered TV lift and space for entertainment system components. To port is a bar with icemaker. The salon opens directly onto the aft deck through double sliding doors. 

The galley is conveniently located on the same level as the salon and is properly designed to be used while underway. Either Corian or granite counter tops can be ordered. There are ample storage lockers and drawers, and appliances include a 21 cu. ft. side-by-side fridge/freezer with teak-panel doors and chilled water & ice dispenser; Miele induction cooktop with practical custom stainless steel pot-holders; convection microwave; and an undermount double stainless steel sink with waste disposer. Space has been provided for an optional dishwasher. A 20-gallon water heater is conveniently located close to the sinks for instant hot water. A pass-through dumbwaiter makes it safe and easy to serve food and drinks to guests on the flying bridge.

Fleming's signature low-profile design is evident even in the interior, as just a few steps lead up to pilothouse and down to the accommodations. 

Accommodations

The perfect close to a day of cruising is to retire to a comfortable cabin. The Fleming 55 offers easy access to all the accommodations via a central passageway. A separate washer and drier are conveniently located behind a sliding door in this passage.

The master cabin is forward for maximum light and ventilation. It features a tapered queen berth with headboard. The bed lifts at the press of a button to access storage for bulky items. The bed also slides aft to make it easier to make the bed. There are two hanging lockers with shelves, teak louvered doors and space for a TV.

The master cabin has an en suite head with Corian, marble or granite countertops and a molded fiberglass shower stall. Hans-Grohe faucets are used throughout and feature a thermostatically controlled shower. 

The port guest cabin is offered with either two single or one double bed with headboards. An additional slide-out upper berth with either layout is optional. The aft bulkhead has generous bookshelves. The starboard guest cabin has one lower and one upper, slide-out, upper berth. This cabin can also be offered as an optional office with desk, lockers, bookshelves and space for a computer & printer.

The guest head features a one-piece fiberglass molding and shower stall with bi-fold stainless steel doors. The attractive ceramic basin is set in a Corian, marble or granite countertop. Faucets are Hans-Grohe with a thermostatically controlled shower.

Throughout the yacht all lighting is LED type with polished stainless steel fittings. Teak and holly soles are standard in all interior areas.

Engine Room

The Fleming 55 engine room is meticulously well thought out and provides easy accessibility to every piece of equipment.

A signature feature of the Fleming 55 is its quietness and freedom from vibration. Much of the credit for this lies with the Aquadrive system, which isolates the engine and transmission from the propeller thrust, permitting the use of much softer engine mounts. Aquadrive is fitted as standard on every Fleming 55 and their rotating couplings are concealed beneath fiberglass covers for safety.

Another reason for the quietness of the Fleming is the careful attention paid to sound insulation. Lead/foam insulation is used extensively throughout and all hatches are dogged down on rubber gaskets. There are even double hatches separated by an air space over each engine.

Fuel tanks are made of fiberglass with integrally molded sumps to allow maximum useage of fuel. Vinylester resin is used in their construction on the interior and fire-retardant resin in the outer layers. The fuel system has been designed to make the transfer of fuel foolproof. It is impossible to inadvertently overfill one tank by incorrectly switching a fuel return valve.

Access to the engine room is via two hatches in the salon sole and from the lazarette through a uniquely shaped oval door designed for easy access. Engine room intake air enters from the lazarette to ensure it is free of salt before reaching the engines and generators.

For safety and convenience each Cummins QSC 500HP engine has a start and a stop button located in the engine room, and a PTO (power take-off) on the gearbox provides hydraulic power for the stabilizers which are standard equipment on all Flemings.

Inside the large lazarette are four polyethylene water tanks totaling 300 gallons (1,135 liters), battery master switches, and a 3,500 watt inverter. Four air conditioning compressors provide heating and cooling for the entire yacht. Against the transom is the steering system with its connection point for the autopilot. The tops for the rudder stocks terminate above the waterline. Despite all this equipment there remains 95 cu. ft. of storage for fenders and other cruising gear. Access to the engine room is through the oval-shaped door.

In many modern designs it has become fashionable to eliminate the inside steering station, but the Fleming 55 features a pilothouse which closely resembles the bridge of a much larger vessel. We created a dedicated place from which the boat is piloted and controlled without any distractions from other on-board activities but which is still only three steps from the salon and galley. Four interior steps safely lead to the upper flying bridge station.

Specially designed removable consoles provide ample room for a full range of modern electronic equipment without intruding on the engine instrumentation. Overhead consoles provide additional space. There is also a proper chart area with drawers and a chart light. Electrical panels swing out to provide easy access to wiring connections and the inside of the flying bridge console is accessed through a swing-out bookcase. The watch-keeper has their own Stidd helm seat and an adjacent, raised L-shaped settee and table provide a comfortable social area with excellent visibility through the side and forward windows.

This is truly the nerve center of the boat where all the systems and crew come together in complete harmony.

CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS

All Fleming Yachts are built to comply with the appropriate marine and environmental regulations for the area in which the yacht is delivered

    USA - NMMA Certified Manufacturer fully complying with: ABYC, USCG and EPA regulations.

    European - Built to CE-RCD Category "A" Ocean Standard using the relevant ISO standards.

    Australia - Australian Standard 1799.1-2009

    Canada - Transport Canada TP1332E 04/2010

MANAGEMENT & ENVIRONMENT

Fleming Yachts Construction (HK) Ltd management and environmental systems have met and been approved by ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management Systems and ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Management Standards.

The question most manufacturers ask themselves when considering a new feature is whether it is necessary to include it in order to sell the boat. In the case of the Fleming, we ask only whether its inclusion will make the boat safer, better or more convenient. That is why we have introduced literally hundreds of refinements since we started construction in 1985 and why we continue the process today.

For that reason, Fleming Yachts reserves the right to make changes to specifications and equipment without notice. 

Specifications

  • LOA (hull): 55' 9" (16.99m)
  • LOA (including swim step and anchor platform): 60' 9" (18.50m)
  • LWL: 50' 10" (15.5m)
  • Beam: 16' (4.88m)
  • Draft: 5' (1.52m)
  • Air draft (to top of radar arch): 16' (4.88m)
  • Minimum Operating Condition: 67,801 Lbs. (30,754kg)
  • Loaded Condition: 80,178 Lbs. (36,368kg)
  • Main Engines: Twin Cummins QSC 8.3 500 hp with common rail fuel system
  • Transmission: Twin Disc MG5075A
  • Reduction Ratio: 2.53:1
  • Engine Controls: Glendinning EEC3 (with back-up system)
  • Generator: 17Kw, 60Hz Onan eQD (European model 13.5Kw, 50Hz)
  • Stabilizers: ABT TRAC 7.5 Sq. Ft fins with winglets, 220RMB model actuators
  • Fuel Tanks: 1,000 USG (3,785 Liters) in four tanks
  • Bowthruster: Sidepower SE250 15.5 hp (11.4Kw)
  • Water Tanks: 300 USG (1,135 Liters) in four tanks
  • Black Water Tank: 100 USG (378 Liters)
  • Monitoring System:  Fleming First Mate (FFM) - Boning

Specification

Virtual tour.

  • Download Brochure
  • Download Full Spec
  • Make Enquiry

Exceptional Yachting

The Fleming 55 has a range of 2,000 nautical miles at 8 knots yet, with her standard Twin Cummins QSC 500 hp common rail engines, she can attain a top speed of approximately 18 knots. Maximum sustained cruising speed is around 17 knots where her moderate deadrise provides a very comfortable ride. On longer passages, Fleming owners typically cruise at a very economical speed of 10 knots, where the typical fuel burn is slightly more than 10 gph.

The Fleming’s deep keel provides protection for the running gear and stability in following seas. Because noise and vibration contribute to fatigue, Fleming has paid special attention to producing a yacht which has become the standard in the industry for its whisper quiet, ultra smooth ride. Fundamental to this achievement is the use of Aquadrive anti-vibration drive systems.

The Fleming 55 was first introduced in 1986, and since that time it has benefited from a rigorous program of evolution. There have been literally hundreds of improvements made, both big and small. While its legendary hull design remains essentially the same, today’s Fleming 55 is a thoroughly modern yacht utilizing advanced technology, materials and construction methods. In 2019 construction of hull number 250 is well underway, making it one of the most successful production yachts in history.

Boat Enquiry

  • GDOR Tick this box if you are happy to receive marketing communications - The personal data you supply will not be passed on to third parties for commercial purposes. Data collected by us is held in accordance with the UK Data Protection Act. All reasonable precautions are taken to prevent unauthorised access to this information.
  • Name This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
  • 1  /  20

fleming yachts 55 review

  • LOA 55' 9 (16.99m)
  • LOA (w/swim and anchor platforms) 60' 9 (18.50m)
  • LWL 50' 10 (15.5m)
  • Beam 16' (4.88m)
  • Draft 5' (1.52m)
  • Air Draft (to top of arch) 16' (4.88m)
  • Displacement 67,801 Lbs. (30,754kg)
  • Fuel 1,000 US gal (3,785 litres)
  • Water 300 US gal (1,135 litres)

fleming yachts 55 review

  • Hull 55-232
  • Hull 55-217
  • Hull 55-213

Flybridge

Newsletter sign-up

Sign-up to receive updates and promotions.

  • Email address *

You can amend or withdraw consent at any time by emailing us. Further details regarding how we process your personal data can be found in our Privacy Policy .

Privacy Overview

CookieDurationDescription
cookielawinfo-checbox-analytics11 monthsThis cookie is set by GDPR Cookie Consent plugin. The cookie is used to store the user consent for the cookies in the category "Analytics".
cookielawinfo-checbox-functional11 monthsThe cookie is set by GDPR cookie consent to record the user consent for the cookies in the category "Functional".
cookielawinfo-checbox-others11 monthsThis cookie is set by GDPR Cookie Consent plugin. The cookie is used to store the user consent for the cookies in the category "Other.
cookielawinfo-checkbox-necessary11 monthsThis cookie is set by GDPR Cookie Consent plugin. The cookies is used to store the user consent for the cookies in the category "Necessary".
cookielawinfo-checkbox-performance11 monthsThis cookie is set by GDPR Cookie Consent plugin. The cookie is used to store the user consent for the cookies in the category "Performance".
viewed_cookie_policy11 monthsThe cookie is set by the GDPR Cookie Consent plugin and is used to store whether or not user has consented to the use of cookies. It does not store any personal data.

Log in or Sign up

Click for Delta

You are using an out of date browser. It may not display this or other websites correctly. You should upgrade or use an alternative browser .

fleming yachts 55 review

Fall Rush New Member

Fleming Owners; Where are you? Would love to hear of your experiences with purchasing. I am leaning toward a 55 but still considering; Grand Banks 59 (most expensive) Selene 58 (cheaper) Any other similar builder suggestions would be appreciated as well. John W

84far

84far Senior Member

John, My uncle had the Selene 58 for about 6 months, then sold it, someone offered him more money then what he paid for it… cant say no with those ones. So I can’t tell u about wear and tear. i can tell u that the metal work looked pretty good, but it could have been 304g s/s and not a better grade, and the timber work was fine also, its only when u get up and close to the timber work where u notice the joining could have been a bit better in some areas. u do hear some scary stories coming from china, but it seems to be ok with this brand. I feel that this line of boats are a bit young for any bad stories to arise though. I personally would stick with the GB, u know your going to get the boat u paid for. Good hunting far

Kafue

Kafue Senior Member

Fleming 55 alternative If you are looking at a Fleming 55 then you should also consider the Offshore 58 or 62 (same boat, just different stern arrangement). I had one, 1996 58' with MAN engines. Great all round boat, good in the ocean and very comfortable for extended cruising. Even used mine for marlin fishing. In comparison to the 55 Fleming, it is a FAR larger vessel. The salon especially. Sailed mine down most the Queensland coast and have nothing but good experiences to share. Was caught in a following sea, at least 4 to 5 meters and she tracked true all the way. Just watch out for moisture in the sides of pilothouse and check the sole here as well because many owners cruise in all weather with the pilothouse doors open, not realising how much sea water is being blown in, this then tracks into the master cabin and ensuite. Believe the Fleming is a very well built boat. The Offshore is built in Taiwan by Carmague Yard, excellent reputation IMO. Selene is different as I believe it is full displacement, so its built to survive the worst seas and you will use more for extended cruising rather than a day trip. Any of these 3 vessels are, in my opinion, the dream boat for a couple! DO IT!!!!!!!
Thanks fellas

PropBet

PropBet Senior Member

We looked at both their 55 and 65 extensively and was pretty impressed with them both. The size difference between the two was night and day. The 55 was a little snug, but very well put together and very well thought out. The jump from the 55 to the 65 is a completely different boat in both size and engineering. I'm personally not a huge fan of the MAN engines they use in the 65, but they seem do work well for them. There were a few weird however minor quirks about them on the finish. We were given a detailed tour of the boat with praise on their fit and finish all the way through from the factory rep. and then when we came across something as minor as a door latch / strike plate that was completely butchered, we were kind of left scratching our heads. Out on the water, both the 55 and 65 are very fine boats. Very predictable, stable, quiet, and comfortable. We have friends with an older 55 which we've spent a fair amount of time on the water with them on, which led up to look at their current offerings when we were looking for a smaller boat. I was impressed with everything about them other than the couple of minor quirks like I mentioned earlier. It's a displacement hull, so it's not fast, but it is stable. We ended up going with something in the same range, but would get up and cruise at 17ish kts. If cruise speed wasn't one of our major considerations, we would have probably purchased a Fleming without reservation. Very well built, very functional, well thought out for the cruiser, and safe.
PropBet, Thank you for your insight. - What do you mean "MAN" engines? - Also, Fleming is adamant that they will cruise comfortably at a true 16-17 knots when needed. - What did you end up with? - Do you know of any other resources that Fleming owners use to convene? JW
Fall Rush said: PropBet, Thank you for your insight. - What do you mean "MAN" engines? - Also, Fleming is adamant that they will cruise comfortably at a true 16-17 knots when needed. - What did you end up with? - Do you know of any other resources that Fleming owners use to convene? JW Click to expand...

'RoundTheHorn

'RoundTheHorn Senior Member

Fleming Promotional Magazine The magazine from Fleming is called Venturer and can be viewed directly from the Fleming website. http://www.flemingyachts.com/vmag.html Just click on the image of the magazine cover to view.
PropBet, Your replies are meaningfull so I hope I don't come off as argumentative but; Flemming touts itself as a semi displacement and "will cruise all day" at 16-17, refering to a real comfortable 16 knots. They say, "Anything above that is not comfortable and therefore not practical for more than a couple hours." Does that mean the bow is pointing toward the moon between 11 and 17 knots? Since I have yet to take a ride, I continue to wonder... As far as the GPH numbers; I don't see that the GB59 is much better. Lastly, the GB59 is an absolute gem and would be interested in yours but my experience is that they are about 250K more than a new FL55. Are you on the East Coast? John W
Fall Rush said: PropBet, Your replies are meaningfull so I hope I don't come off as argumentative but; Flemming touts itself as a semi displacement and "will cruise all day" at 16-17, refering to a real comfortable 16 knots. They say, "Anything above that is not comfortable and therefore not practical for more than a couple hours." Click to expand...
Fall Rush, here is the burn info on the GB 59 This is from GB, which our numbers are a little different (slightly better). RPM / KTS / GPH 900 / 8.2 / 6 1200 / 10.3 / 13 1500 / 11.7 / 32 1800 / 17.2 / 64 2100 / 22.3 / 91 2300 / 22.5 / 103 You can compare to Fleming's info on their website.

captainJJ

captainJJ New Member

Fleming Owners If you are seriously looking at an alternative to a GB try a Marlow Explorer, very good well built and good re sale:
captainJJ said: If you are seriously looking at an alternative to a GB try a Marlow Explorer, very good well built and good re sale: Click to expand...
Ocean Alexander So it goes on!!! Have you considered an Ocean Alexander? Not sure how good the quality is on the newer ones but the old ones were terriffic. Had an OA 50 Mark1, full displacement, rolled in the ocean like a barrel and was powered by twin elastic bands (Ford Lehman 120Hp), but we loved her like a baby. All character, but lots of work on the teak rails. They still fetch good prices due to their strength. Would consider a newer plus 60 footer. Good hunting.
OA is another great boat in comparison to both Fleming and Marlow. I think they're better than Marlow's, personally. I looked at the 60 Classico when it was first released, and it's quite nice. Not our preferred GA, but a nice boat indeed and well worth a look for someone in that market. It's very rare to find an OA owner who has anything bad to say about their boat. Current, or prior vintage.
PropBet said: OA is another great boat in comparison to both Fleming and Marlow. I think they're better than Marlow's, personally. I looked at the 60 Classico when it was first released, and it's quite nice. Not our preferred GA, but a nice boat indeed and well worth a look for someone in that market. It's very rare to find an OA owner who has anything bad to say about their boat. Current, or prior vintage. Click to expand...

Kapn

Kapn Member

I've spent about 10 years running Flemings, Grand Banks, Marlows, OA's, and others. The one thing I've found is that boat owners come in two types: ones who always think their boat was the best choice, and those who always complain about their boat and have issues with the builder, broker, and yard. The combination of seakeeping, efficiency, and speed are different things to different boaters. I've run Flemings all day long at 16knots, so I know that they will cruise that speed. I believe they market the boat with a semi-displacement hull, not a planing or displacement hull. Keep in mind that every boat is a trade off in terms of speed, cost, hull design, layout, etc. Weight will bring a smoother ride, but more fuel burn at speed. Less surface area under the water (rudders, keel, stabilizer sizes) will bring speed, but reduce rough seas slower speed performance. High yearly production numbers will bring lower resale values, custom one off boats will result in terrible resale.

rudolph

rudolph New Member

Do you favor any ONE of the boats you ran and if so, why? Thanks!

Burger Boy

Burger Boy New Member

I'd recommend looking at a Jefferson Pilot House 57 or 64 as well. We have a 57 and it is a great boat. Not the best of the best quality wise, but if you take care of her she stays in good condition. The boats from 4-5 years ago looked like a Selene, but were sleeker, as they're semi-disp. The salon windows are a bit different now. The difference between the 57 and 64 is a slightly larger salon and an extended cockpit.
It's a tough call. The situations (in terms of sea state, wind, etc) are always different and the boats are never exact model to model comparisons. So all I can do is generalize what I've observed. The Flemings have a lower cruise than some other boats (16-17ish kts) in good weather. But as soon as it starts to turn nasty, they don't bounce around as much. They are definitely the quietest boats I've run. The OA's were nice as well, probably not the same fit and finish in the engine room and other places you don't normally look. Wider beams meant more interior space along with a higher deck level to give it a yacht like feel. Add in less weight overall and it seemed to bob like an empty milk jug going across the gulf. On the Marlow, I was impressed with the open layout, until I spent a few hours running the boat when we were out afterdark and the lower helm was a compromise. In good weather it wasn't an issue, but the distractions from the family and televisions while navigating in the rain and fog was a bit much on the nerves. Having a pilothouse also gives you a place to sit, read, watch tv and be away from the other people in the salon. On the Marlow I also noticed a vibration that seemed to permeate the entire hull at certain speeds. I've heard it from other captains too, I guess it's part of that lightweight construction. Having the ability to run above 20 knots was nice, but we rarely used that speed as it wasn't as comfortable as in the 'teens where the boat rode a little softer. Another rambling thought: the owners of boats are difficult to stereotype in general, but some boats tend to draw less experienced owners who buy a boat based on square footage or 'floorplan' like it's a house. They don't realize that every part of the boat is designed, engineered, and built to different standards with different builders. Other owners are more experienced and don't buy a boat because it's big, but because it has the highest quality. If I ever win the lottery it will be a Fleming for me.
  • No, create an account now.
  • Yes, my password is:
  • Forgot your password?

YachtForums: We Know Big Boats!

IMAGES

  1. Fleming 55

    fleming yachts 55 review

  2. Fleming 55 Yacht For Sale

    fleming yachts 55 review

  3. Fleming Yachts 55

    fleming yachts 55 review

  4. 1998 Fleming 55 Power New and Used Boats for Sale

    fleming yachts 55 review

  5. FLEMING 55

    fleming yachts 55 review

  6. Fleming 55 Yacht For Sale

    fleming yachts 55 review

COMMENTS

  1. Fleming 55: A Yacht That's Aging Like Fine Wine

    The Bernsteins generally cruise at 8 to 10 knots. At 10 knots, the Fleming 55's twin Cummins QSC 500 diesels burn 10 gph, or a gallon per mile, a really efficient fuel burn for a 55-foot boat. Top speed is listed as 19 knots. David says the 55 does about 17.5 knots in pretty favorable seas.

  2. The Fleming 55

    The Fleming 55 is a three-stateroom boat, with wide side decks and a large covered aft cockpit. Typical of Taiwan yacht building of the era, there was lots of exterior teak, including a teak-slotted swim platform. With hull no. 39, the platform was replaced with a fiberglass structure, a step that signified a shift away from maintenance ...

  3. Boat Review: Fleming 55

    Tony Fleming must have known from the beginning that he had a winner in his Fleming 55. But only through a consistent program of upgrading, improving and refining the original has it reached its current status of a thoroughly modern living legend. Advertisement. Fleming Yachts, 949-645-1024; www.flemingyachts.com.

  4. Outer Reef vs Fleming vs Grand Banks

    The Outer Reef 58' is not standing height if you're over 6' tall either, with a very similar ER design. One just needs to check for themselves, but also talk to existing and former owners. The Fleming 55's engine room height is 5 feet or less depending on where you are in the engine room. maldwin , Dec 15, 2019.

  5. Fleming Yachts 55 (2018-)

    The Fleming 55 is designed for a cruising couple, or two couples, or even a family to make long offshore and coastal passages in comfort and safety. And that means to be able to travel to the Caribbean, or to the Pacific at trawler speeds. At 7.4 knots, we found that she has a range of 2,788 nautical miles.

  6. Fleming 55: Time-Tested Motoryacht

    In production for almost 30 years, the Fleming 55 is still being built today. "They just delivered Hull 231, and there have been eight to 10 changes with every new hull," says John Bullock with Burr Yacht Sales, which is Fleming's East Coast dealer in the United States. "If you look at a late '80s or early '90s boat, fundamentally ...

  7. Fleming Yachts 55 (2018-) Test Video

    For the full written captain's report, test and performance data, and more about the Fleming Yachts 55, go to: http://www.boattest.com/review/fleming-yachts...

  8. The Iconic Fleming 55 Cruiser is Still Going Strong After 36 Years

    Even after 36 years of production, and a price that starts at just over $3 million, there's still a three-year waiting list for the iconic 55. The Fleming 55 was introduced in 1986. It's still ...

  9. Fleming 55: An Updated Classic Cruising Boat

    A pilothouse motoryacht, the Fleming 55 has three staterooms and two heads, a large, 130-square-feet cockpit, a flying bridge that can seat 11 plus an aft boat deck. The comfortable salon, with galley forward, and the pilothouse, with an L-shaped settee and interior access to the flybridge, all are filled with rich teak; fit and finish are ...

  10. Fleming Yachts 55 (2014-)

    The Fleming 55 is now 27 years old and shows no sign of aging - that's longer than the venerable Bertram 31 was in production! Why does this vessel have so much longevity and show no signs of getting tired? The big reason is that most boaters consider her as drop-dead gorgeous today as when she was when first launched in 1986. Then, she can do most anything from sailing across the Atlantic ...

  11. Fleming 55 Pilothouse: Boat Review

    The Fleming 55 Pilothouse has a full fibreglass laminate with twin 500hp Cummins QSC 8.3-litre, six-cylinder common-rail, turbocharged and after-cooled four-stroke diesel engines. It has Twin Disc MG5075A, 2.53:1 transmissions powering the shaftdrives. All up the Fleming 55 Pilothouse weighs in at a considerable 36-tonnes wet with a huge 3785lt ...

  12. The Ultimate Fleming

    Jun 2, 2014. This review is the web extra to our 'BIG BOATS' round-up in PassageMaker's July/August 2014 Issue, on newsstands 6/24/14. During the past 25 years, Fleming motoryachts have evolved into what many experts consider "the ultimate cruising yacht.". Beautiful to look at, robustly constructed and meticulously engineered, Flemings ...

  13. 2012 Boat Review: Fleming 55

    At more than 30 tonnes dry the Fleming 55 is around 8000kg heavier than the bulk of vessels in the 55ft range. Most modern vessels use a cored construction technique, where the hull is composed of light core material sandwiched between two relatively thin layers of glass. These boats are lighter and faster than those constructed of solid glass ...

  14. Fleming Yachts 55

    The Fleming 55 has a range of 2,000 nautical miles at 8 knots with Cummins QSC 500hp common rail engines. Top speed is 16-18 knots. At 10 knots the fuel burn is just over 10 gallons per hour — impressive for a yacht this size. Over 240 Fleming 55s have been built making it one of the most successful production yachts in history.

  15. Fleming 55

    Fleming 55. John Wooldridge. Jun 12, 2023. Illustration by Jim Ewing. The first Fleming to arrive in the U.S. was offloaded from a freighter in Long Beach, California, during November 1986. It was a 50-footer, built in the same hull mold as the Fleming 55. A dam had been inserted in the mold to shorten her because at the time it was believed a ...

  16. $2.2M Fleming 55 Trawler YACHT TOUR! (Perfect Liveaboard)

    I recently had the opportunity to jump aboard this brand new Fleming 55 trawler yacht, so join me as we take a look around this stunning vessel! Become a mem...

  17. 2.2 Million Dollar Yacht Tour : Fleming 55

    The original and a class act - the Fleming 55.Sponsored by: https://www.boatsandyachtswarranty.com In association with:https://www.mdlmarinas.co.ukhttps://ww...

  18. Fleming 55 Yacht For Sale

    The Fleming 55 has a range of over 2,000 nautical miles with an incredibly comfortable ride. The Fleming 55 was first introduced in 1985 and may be the perfect 55-foot boat for cruising. ... Fleming Yachts Construction (HK) Ltd management and environmental systems have met and been approved by ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management Systems and ISO ...

  19. Fleming 55 boats for sale

    Find Fleming 55 boats for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld. Offering the best selection of Fleming boats to choose from.

  20. Fleming 55

    The Fleming 55 was first introduced in 1986, and since that time it has benefited from a rigorous program of evolution. There have been literally hundreds of improvements made, both big and small. While its legendary hull design remains essentially the same, today's Fleming 55 is a thoroughly modern yacht utilizing advanced technology ...

  21. Fleming 55: Prices, Specs, Reviews and Sales Information

    The motor yacht Fleming 55 is produced by the brand Fleming since 1986. The Fleming 55 is a 16.99 meter expedition yacht with a draft of 1.52 meters which can reach speeds of up to 18 knots. The base price of a new Fleming 55 is not currently published, please contact the itBoat team for pricing details. Length. 16.99 m / 55' 9".

  22. Fleming Owners?

    I don't know why, it's just personal preference, so take it with a grain of salt. 2. Per Fleming, of course it will "cruise" at 17 knots. Ask Tony Fleming to define 'cruise' for you (when needed is not 'cruise'). The 55 and 65 at 17kts is burning 45 and 65+ GPH respectively and taking your range from >3,000 miles to +/-500 miles.